Does anyone here love Classical music /

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
Me.



I love Bach, Beethoven, Mozart & Vivaldi.



But I also love to hear relatively modern composers such as Vaughan Williams..variations on Tellemann still send a shiver down my spine. Then there is Faure and Philip Glass whom I consider something close to genius.



Missed anyone ? I am sure I have.



Please fill in my ignorance gaps.



.I am willing to broaden my horizons.



Aqua
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 41
    hardheadhardhead Posts: 644member
    There are a lot of people here who appreciate classic jazz. I would expect the same of classical music.



    I just acquired the entire set of Herbert Von Karajan conducting the Berliner Philharmonic doing the complete Beethoven catalog on Deutsche Grammophone. About 70 slabs of vinyl perfection. Mmmm. I also found a now kind of hard to find CD of Einojuhani Rautavaara's "Angel Of Light" symphony. Leif Segerstam conducting the Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra. Absolutly astounding!



    Just a couple of suggestions.
  • Reply 2 of 41
    aquafireaquafire Posts: 2,758member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by hardhead





    I just acquired the entire set of Herbert Von Karajan conducting the Berliner Philharmonic doing the complete Beethoven catalog on Deutsche Grammophone.



    Yes, Old Herb sure put the "Awe back into Orchestra music.



    "
    Quote:

    I also found a now kind of hard to find CD of Einojuhani Rautavaara's "Angel Of Light" symphony. Leif Segerstam conducting the Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra. Absolutly astounding!



    "



    Never heard of it.. But it does sound fascinating though.





    Thankyou for the tip, I shall be checking it out soon.



    Aqua.
  • Reply 3 of 41
    wrong robotwrong robot Posts: 3,907member
    My favorite composer is Stravinsky
  • Reply 4 of 41
    aquafireaquafire Posts: 2,758member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Wrong Robot

    My favorite composer is Stravinsky



    Didn't old Igor shake hands with Mickey Mouskey in the opening scenes of Fantasia?
  • Reply 5 of 41
    splinemodelsplinemodel Posts: 7,311member
    I like music based on the content and the instruments. While there are different types of compositions (content) I like, I don't like music that doesn't use instruments with relatively narrow bandwidths. That is, I like instruments with bulky frequency response like organs and electric guitars that have had the crap amped out of them. The other way around this is to play a lot of instruments at once.



    So in classical there are all sorts of compositions from A-Z that fit the bill. Most notably I like Bach's organ stuff and Operas.
  • Reply 6 of 41
    ganondorfganondorf Posts: 573member
    I have always liked Richard Wagner.
  • Reply 7 of 41
    sdw2001sdw2001 Posts: 16,918member
    Hey guys:



    Well this one is my area. Maybe giant will show up to mock me and we can turn this thread into flame war



    There are so many composers, I'm not sure where to begin.



    Pre-classical/Baroque: Bach, Handel



    Classical (1750's to early 1800's): Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven



    19th Century:



    Berlioz, Wagner, Brahms (check out some of his choral pieces), Mendelssohn, Verdi, Rossini, Chopin, Tchaikovsky, Bruckner



    Post-romantic/impressionist:



    Debussy, Rachmaninoff (my favorite),



    Modern: Stravinsky, Shostakovich (I think you'd like him)



    Atonal: Webern, Berg, Schoenberg (probably not your thing...I'm no fan).



    Others: Rimsky-Korsakov, Aaron Copland, Prokofiev, Mussorgsky.



    I'm too lazy to go on. Some googling will help. Feel free to PM or e-mail with any questions or whatever.
  • Reply 8 of 41
    I like very old music and very new music. Thomas Tallis wrote 'Spem in Alium' in the mid 1500s; it's a piece for 40 voices and it makes Arvo Part look like Axl Rose. I recommend that, for a start.
  • Reply 9 of 41
    fred_ljfred_lj Posts: 607member
    Gustav Mahler.....so much more for me to discover from this incredible, visionary composer. His stuff is sort of an "acquired" taste, so it's best to start out with stuff that won't bore you to start with (heh, sorry, no other way to put it until you start listening and then can enjoy it), e.g., 5th, 1st, 2nd, 4th symphonies. He never wrote an opera despite being a revolutionary interpreter of Wagner, but his choral symphonies (e.g, 8, 2) and Lieder sind...eh, are incredible, masterful...the kind of stuff modern "big-time" film score writers strive for.



    You might also enjoy just concertos for a while...I was hooked on violin concertos for a while, like Sarah Chang on the Paganini, Heifeitz on Brahms, Tchaikovsky, other showpieces; Anna Sophie-Mutter with von Karajan on Vivaldi's 4 Seasons, Perlman on Mendelssohn and Bruch. It's all great!!



    Then, there's quartet music! About one of the best purchases you can make is on iTunes (I had it on CD before iTunes came about) -- a Deutsche Grammophon recording with Emerson Quartet on Dvorak, Tchaikovsky, and Borodin quartets (these are trademark pieces, you'll recognize them when you hear them).



    It's an exciting listening experience that I wish more people were interested in; and it turns out sometimes that more are that I just don't know about (kind of a "closeted" thing among people my age -- 20/younger). And listening to classical doesn't exclude one from any of the other genres, but if anything it lets you discern more clearly the musicianship in them.
  • Reply 10 of 41
    daverdaver Posts: 496member
    Mahler is great stuff, fred_lj.



    I've been a fan of classical music for most of my 22 years, although I don't explore new material or composers as often as I'd like to.



    I've got a thing for 20th century Russian composers right now: Prokofiev, Shostakovich, and such. I always liked Sibelius, too.
  • Reply 11 of 41
    I think my appreciation for classical music comes from years playing in bands and orchestras.



    I like pretty much anything post-baroque.



    I heard a piece a few years ago on NPR and had to order it. It is "Symphony of Sorrowful Songs" by Henryk Gorecki. Very different. Solo female over very thick stings. It is on iTMS.
  • Reply 12 of 41
    rampancyrampancy Posts: 363member
    Wow. Not only does AO have a kick-ass taste in Jazz, but they also have a kick-ass taste in Classical.



    I agree with Aquafire that Philip Glass is amazing. I picked up his 2-CD Symphony #5 and while at first it took a little getting used to, it was truly an amazing piece. When I saw "The Fog of War", I smiled when I saw that Philip Glass did the soundtrack. A beautiful effort.



    I also have to vouch for Shostakovich. His "Leningrad Symphony" is incredible, as is his Symphony #6, "The Year 1917". As you're listening to it, you can almost feel as if you're in the trenches with the Russians, fighting back the hordes of German soldiers.
  • Reply 13 of 41
    powerdocpowerdoc Posts: 8,123member
    Well i love classical music too.



    The list is incredibely long. I will limit it to great experiences



    The piano concerto by chopin (honey in hear)

    The nocturnes of Chopin ( i love the one with Anton Rubisnstein : must be heard late in the evening of course)



    The carmina burana (in live not in CD) by Karl Orf (excalibur music)



    Lizt piano music sonata by Martha Argerich



    2nd concerto of Rachmaninov by Martha Argerich (better than Horowitz) absolutely brilliant live recorded performance (philips)





    Haydn quators



    Bach (lot of stuff there : piano concertos, sonatas, viola, Brandebourgeois ..;



    Requiem of Mozart (the music who make me cry)

    concertos for clarinet





    Requieme of Faure ( a good alternative to the previous one)



    Concerto for Harp from Boieldieu



    concertino for Trombon par Ferdinand David (wonderfull performance by Christian Lindberg, the best trombonist i know)



    Grieg : Peer gynt suites



    Sibelius : the swan of Tuolala, the violin concerto (wonderful performance with Oistrach)



    Debussy piano music and symphonia : impressionist music



    Satie, fun light hearted piano music



    Gershwin : unique style (for the record Gershwin, asked one day an advice about music to Ravel, Ravel replied i have nothing to teach at you, continue your way, dont change anything)



    Ravel : Dapnis and Chloe, concerto for the left hand (the best transposer of piano music to symphonic music)



    Shubert : the eight , the trout, piano music



    Beethoven the giant : piano, symphonia, concerto, quartet ...( a gold mine like bach)



    Holst : the planets



    Vivaldi : 4 seasons



    Aranjuez concerto for guitar



    Saint saens : concerto for animals



    Tchaikowski, Moussorgski, Rachmaninov ....



    The list is long, long , long









  • Reply 14 of 41
    wrong robotwrong robot Posts: 3,907member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by SDW2001

    -snip-

    I'm too lazy to go on. Some iTunes Music Store browsing will help. Feel free to PM or e-mail with any questions or whatever.






    Great post....I just wanted to modify this one bit
  • Reply 15 of 41
    ganondorfganondorf Posts: 573member
    Ah, how could I have forgotten Erik Satie? Gymnopedie No. 1 is beautiful.



    So, to correct myself, Wagner AND Satie are my favorites.
  • Reply 16 of 41
    aquafireaquafire Posts: 2,758member
    Other than Glass.



    Any other composers of merit from the 1980's and onward. ?
  • Reply 17 of 41
    ganondorfganondorf Posts: 573member
    Successful composers of the modern era go on to compose soundtracks for movies, games, etc.
  • Reply 18 of 41
    wrong robotwrong robot Posts: 3,907member
    Though not 'classical' another one of my favorite composers is Steve Reich
  • Reply 19 of 41
    matlockmatlock Posts: 44member
    Since I studied classical piano for 8 years starting at 6 years old, i tend to prefer solo piano stuff, especially the more technical compositions. I LOVE Liszt! Hungarian Rhapsodies are so much fun to play, and listen to of course. Chopin is my second favorite, with his Mazurkas being his best IMHO. Debussy's piano work is also very good. Half of Beethoven's sonatas are pure genius, the other half I don't care as much.



    Mahler wrote the best symphonies I think, the 6th and 8th in particular. Strangely, I've never been really interested by Bach and Mozart. It might be due in part to their work being so massive that I don't know where to start. I don't like the sound of organ, so a major part of Bach is not for me . But his Cello Suites are amazing, among others.



    I do love classical music but I'm first and foremost a rock lover, therefore I don't know as much as I would like about it. Also It's not easy choosing the right CDs the buy. The same piece can be available in 20 versions from 15 different performers on 5 labels. Which of these is/are worth a listen? There are magazines, comments on amazon and other sources but still, it's easy to get lost.



    I haven't played piano in 9 years, and I really miss it... Though I'm getting a piano within the next 2 month!! The artistic section of my brain needs to wake up.
  • Reply 20 of 41
    sdw2001sdw2001 Posts: 16,918member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Ganondorf

    Successful composers of the modern era go on to compose soundtracks for movies, games, etc.



    Actually, that's not really true. Film composing is an entirely different thing from "new music" composing. Film composers often don't even do their own orchestrations. Williams doesn't, for example. I'm working on my Masters in Music and I've taken two composition classes with a successful composer. Today's composers often survive through University teaching posts and comissioned works.
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