Alu blemish (pics)

Posted:
in Current Mac Hardware edited January 2014
hi, my primary machine is a AluBook 17" 1.33 G4. i picked it up when it came out last september and used it exclusively for my design and writing. i don't use an external keyboard but a 5-button mouse. several months ago, i started noticing funny black spots on the aluminum where i rest my palms, both left and right sides of the trackpad. i know the colour is anodized so it's not the paint coming off but it's starting to bother me. has anyone noticed this as well? my palms get sweaty after a while because the palm rests get hot, but i don't sweat profusely. should i do something about this with apple? it's only a cosmetic issue but i still don't like my beautiful alu to have blemishes. i attached some photos of the spots





left side



close up





right side



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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 29
    torifiletorifile Posts: 4,024member
    You've got sweaty palms. I have the same thing happening on the right palm rest of my 14 month old 12" powerbook.
  • Reply 2 of 29
    alcimedesalcimedes Posts: 5,486member
    take a cloth with rubbing alcohol. odds are those are dirty/dead skin spots. they should wipe right off. otherwise you can also scrape them off.
  • Reply 3 of 29
    eugeneeugene Posts: 8,254member
    I'm so glad I didn't inherit sweaty palmed-ness from my father. That's something I really hate. Using a communal Mac or public terminal after somebody with sweaty hands! Ugh, slimy mice!
  • Reply 4 of 29
    johnqjohnq Posts: 2,763member
    I'm sure it's just dirt/oil/skin. My old mousepad would get exactly like that (it was a slightly porous hard plastic). Any scratches would just give more places for dirt/oil/skin to collect into. But it is not some underlying material showing through - it is merely deposited on the surface and should clean off.
  • Reply 5 of 29
    ast3r3xast3r3x Posts: 5,012member
    No, I have the exact same thing and it's actual nick. I was checking them out with a pin and it's like tons of tiny pokes with a pin. It sucks, because since it's cosmetic they said that AppleCare doesn't cover it. So live with it
  • Reply 6 of 29
    alcimedesalcimedes Posts: 5,486member
    the other possibility would be that you are wearing a watch that is damaging the computer, or something along those lines.
  • Reply 7 of 29
    I would invest in an external keyboard. I hardly ever touch my powerbook. When I have to touch it or put it away, I was my hands with soap and warm watler before handling it. I wipe dust from it with a microfiber cloth a couple times a week. I also forbid anyone from touching it without my permission. If they do, they will get thoroughly lambasted by yours truly.



    :P
  • Reply 8 of 29
    It looks like what happens to any aluminum surface when salt comes in contact with it. Salty persperation causing pits in the aluminum.
  • Reply 9 of 29
    wrong robotwrong robot Posts: 3,907member
    awesome, I have a little bit of that on my alubook, glad to hear it's curable.



    now if Only my palms weren't so sweaty
  • Reply 10 of 29
    Quote:

    Originally posted by alcimedes

    the other possibility would be that you are wearing a watch that is damaging the computer, or something along those lines.



    no, i don't wear any metallic objects on my hand, it's completely bare. i don't think it's dirty/dead skin either, it looks like a permanent cosmetic damage. the chemical reaction between alu and salt does make sense. it's fine as is, but i don't want it spreading any further. i'll try rubbing it with alcohol. but what if some of the alcohol touches the screen when the lid is closed? what's a good way to clean the lcd??? thanks
  • Reply 11 of 29
    jubelumjubelum Posts: 4,490member
    I use these .



    They keep my watch, et al, from scratching my 'book. The only problem is that after a few weeks they get kinda bubbly with the heat and use, so I have to deal with the ugly bubbles or replace them with new ones. Overall, they have done a good job, IMHO.



  • Reply 12 of 29
    ast3r3xast3r3x Posts: 5,012member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Jubelum

    I use these .



    They keep my watch, et al, from scratching my 'book. The only problem is that after a few weeks they get kinda bubbly with the heat and use, so I have to deal with the ugly bubbles or replace them with new ones. Overall, they have done a good job, IMHO.







    So which is uglier...holy aluminum or disgusting (and ugly) plastic covering my wrists?
  • Reply 13 of 29
    pbpb Posts: 4,228member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by RenaissanceGirl

    I would invest in an external keyboard. I hardly ever touch my powerbook. When I have to touch it or put it away, I was my hands with soap and warm watler before handling it. I wipe dust from it with a microfiber cloth a couple times a week. I also forbid anyone from touching it without my permission. If they do, they will get thoroughly lambasted by yours truly.



    :P




    Now, these are some drastic measures .
  • Reply 14 of 29
    murbotmurbot Posts: 5,261member
    Quote:

    I hardly ever touch my powerbook. When I have to touch it or put it away, I was my hands with soap and warm water before handling it.



    Oh come now... you honestly finish up work, decide to pack up for the day, and go hit the sink to wash your hands with soap and water first? Wow. That's treading into therapist territory.



    Damn, you guys, this is kind of freaky. I know Robot hasn't had his PowerBook for too long. What the hell are these things going to look like at 4 years old?



    Maybe those Klear Advantage things are the way to go. Just drop some other stickers over the clear, so you can't see the bubbles. Think of it as a neat way to customize your PowerBook.
  • Reply 15 of 29
    torifiletorifile Posts: 4,024member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by murbot

    Oh come now... you honestly finish up work, decide to pack up for the day, and go hit the sink to wash your hands with soap and water first? Wow. That's treading into therapist territory.





    You rang?



    Quote:



    Damn, you guys, this is kind of freaky. I know Robot hasn't had his PowerBook for too long. What the hell are these things going to look like at 4 years old?



    Maybe those Klear Advantage things are the way to go. Just drop some other stickers over the clear, so you can't see the bubbles. Think of it as a neat way to customize your PowerBook.




    I'm not too worried about it, personally. My palms can get pretty sweaty, especially when they're in contact with a hot metal surface (rev. a powerbooks get pretty warm) during the summer. I've had my 'book for about 15 months now and my dots are just becoming noticeable. Nothing I can do about it now.
  • Reply 16 of 29
    buckeyebuckeye Posts: 358member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by murbot



    Damn, you guys, this is kind of freaky. I know Robot hasn't had his PowerBook for too long. What the hell are these things going to look like at 4 years old?



    Maybe those Klear Advantage things are the way to go. Just drop some other stickers over the clear, so you can't see the bubbles. Think of it as a neat way to customize your PowerBook.




    I just noticed that I have these spots developing as well and I have only had my machine for 6 months. Plus I have the overall screen brightness inconsistency problem on the new screen that I have already once had replaced!



    Cosmetic problem or not, this laptop has an excessive amount of design flaws. I should not have to put stickers on the palm rests to avoid the machine looking like crap! What the hell is that?



    I really hope Apple gets their act together on the next powerbook design or I won't be buying another.
  • Reply 17 of 29
    It's a computer, not a work of art. Wear it proudly as the sign that you do more than just admire your computer from a distance.



    -- Mark
  • Reply 18 of 29
    buckeyebuckeye Posts: 358member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by mark_wilkins

    It's a computer, not a work of art. Wear it proudly as the sign that you do more than just admire your computer from a distance.



    -- Mark






    It is not an act of vanity to be concerned about a 6 month old 15inch Powerbook, that you paid $2600 for, deterioriating before your eyes. Especially when you use an Apple laptop BECAUSE you have to rely on it for your job.



    Here is a list of everything that has been wrong with it:



    1. Broken lid lock - repaired, faulty design

    2. Poorest battery life of all Apple powerbooks- lower capacity battery from previous model?

    3. White spots on the screen - poorly designed assembly (had it replaced)

    4. Uneven backlighting (on the replacement screen) - proves that it was not a fluke, still has to be replaced again.

    5. Gap between screen and keyboard - Designed with good intentions, but also causes powerbook to wake from sleep and suck battery life while you don't know it.

    6. Deterioration in the palm rests (pictured above) - How can you not expect sweat on the palm rest? That's why it is called a palm rest.



    I sort of see your point, but I disagree. If I paid a premium for a sports car I wouldn't leave it in a garage and buff it with a diaper, I'd drive the hell out of it. But if the door wouldn't close all the way, it leaked gas, and the headlights quit working, I think I would have a right to complain.
  • Reply 19 of 29
    Unlike the other problems you listed, paint problems are not functional defects except maybe over the extreme long run, by which time your computer will have lost most of its value in any case.



    -- Mark
  • Reply 20 of 29
    buckeyebuckeye Posts: 358member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by mark_wilkins

    Unlike the other problems you listed, paint problems are not functional defects except maybe over the extreme long run, by which time your computer will have lost most of its value in any case.



    -- Mark






    First of all, these Powerbook aren't painted, so there isn't even an inexpensive option available to remedy said problem.



    Second, people buy Apple products due to their long lifespan, reliability, and high resale value. Unfortunately, a flawlessly functioning machine is often unable to draw much of its resale value with a poor appearance.



    The point that you are missing is that the aluminum case flaw is just one more example added to the list of problems with Apple's flagship laptop.
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