New Mac OS X Tiger builds reveal iChat Jabber support, parental controls

Posted:
in macOS edited January 2014
New developmental versions of Apple's Tiger operating system sport beefed up iChat security options and a refined system account management pane with parental controls.



As expected, Apple Computer this week began seeding a select group of developers with new builds of the company's next generation Mac OS X "Tiger" operating system, reliable sources told AppleInsider.



The new seeds, which include builds in the 8A2xx range, are the first developmental versions of Tiger to exit Apple's Cupertino campus since the company's World Wide Developers Conference in June. Revealed in the new builds are features such as Jabber support in iChat and family controls for account management.



Screenshots: Jabber Setup Assistant; About This Mac



In addition to supporting video conferencing with up to three people, the most recent builds of iChat 3.0 include support for Jabber's real-time communications software. The iChat implementation will let organizations host their own Jabber servers, allowing employees to use iChat privately and securely behind a local firewall. A new addition to the iChat setup assistant provides an interface for enabling Jabber support.



Screenshots: Account Family Prefs; Mac OS X Network Error Dialog; Safari Parental Control Blocking



Sources also noted changes to Tiger's account management. In the latest builds of the software, Apple has consolidated its "Security" and "Limitations" account preferences into a set of "Family Controls." Using the new controls, administrative account holders can refine a user's access privileges by application. As standard, Apple lists separate configuration options for the Finder, iChat and Safari; allowing parents and educational institutes to sensor content and restrict access to minors and students.



Screenshots: Safari RSS Prefs; Safari Security Prefs; Censored Web Page



Speaking of Safari, recent builds of the Apple-branded web browser have exposed a set of handy preferences for customizing its new RSS reader capabilities. From a series of drop-down menus, users can tell Safari 2.0 how often to check for RSS feed updates, how long to retain the saved feeds, and what color to label new article listings. Additionally, users can select a default RSS reader other than the Safari browser. Meanwhile, the browser's security preference pane includes a new option to support the aforementioned family preferences (Parental Controls).



The latest builds of Tiger included dozens of additional enhancements that are not present in the release of the system provided to developers in June. Additional reports covering these changes will follow.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 35
    Juicy!!!



    Can't wait to read about the dozens of other changes.
  • Reply 2 of 35
    Here's a quote from a press release that Apple... uh... released in June.



    "Tiger Server includes a brand new iChat server designed for organizations that need to keep internal communication private. Organizations can define their own namespace, use SSL/TSL encryption to ensure privacy and Kerberos for authentication. Tiger Server?s iChat server works with Apple?s popular iChat conferencing software in Mac OS X Tiger and is compatible with open source Jabber clients available on Windows, Linux and popular PDAs."



    The above quoted press release informs, at least hints strongly, that Tiger's version iChat will have Jabber support. I, probably a lot of us, don't remember seeing that press release, so thank you for bringing it to our attention.



    Maybe Apple will release a Jabber compliant version of iChat for Windows and Linux with the technology formerly known as Rendezvous support.



    Edit: Capitalization and Punctuation
  • Reply 3 of 35
    Quote:

    Originally posted by fahlman

    Here's a quote from a press release that Apple... uh... released in June.



    "Tiger Server includes a brand new iChat server designed for organizations that need to keep internal communication private. Organizations can define their own namespace, use SSL/TSL encryption to ensure privacy and Kerberos for authentication. Tiger Server?s iChat server works with Apple?s popular iChat conferencing software in Mac OS X Tiger and is compatible with open source Jabber clients available on Windows, Linux and popular PDAs."



    The above quoted press release informs, at least hints strongly, that Tiger's version iChat will have Jabber support. I, probably a lot of us, don't remember seeing that press release, so thank you for bringing it to our attention.



    Maybe Apple will release a Jabber compliant version of iChat for Windows and Linux with the technology formerly known as Rendezvous support.



    Edit: Capitalization and Punctuation




    what is Jabber?
  • Reply 4 of 35
    Quote:

    Originally posted by fahlman

    Here's a quote from a press release that Apple... uh... released in June.



    "Tiger Server includes a brand new iChat server designed for organizations that need to keep internal communication private. Organizations can define their own namespace, use SSL/TSL encryption to ensure privacy and Kerberos for authentication. Tiger Server?s iChat server works with Apple?s popular iChat conferencing software in Mac OS X Tiger and is compatible with open source Jabber clients available on Windows, Linux and popular PDAs."



    The above quoted press release informs, at least hints strongly, that Tiger's version iChat will have Jabber support. I, probably a lot of us, don't remember seeing that press release, so thank you for bringing it to our attention.



    Maybe Apple will release a Jabber compliant version of iChat for Windows and Linux with the technology formerly known as Rendezvous support.



    Edit: Capitalization and Punctuation




    Why? iChat will work with any Jabber client. Porting iChat to Windows would be a rather difficult task and time-consuming task. Porting any Cocoa app is near-impossible without major rewriting.



    Well...we all knew it was coming (those that read the press release) but we hadn't seen any real evidence like the screenshots (although they *could* have been faked.)
  • Reply 5 of 35
    amoryaamorya Posts: 1,103member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by kim kap sol

    Porting any Cocoa app is near-impossible without major rewriting.



    *cough*YellowBoxForWindows*/cough*



    But I agree, there's no point porting ichat.
  • Reply 6 of 35
    Quote:

    Originally posted by kim kap sol

    Why?



    Maybe so people who don't use a Mac can use iChat; possibly persuading them to purchase a yet to be released iSight for Windows. Similar to iTunes and the iPod.



    So I'm reaching
  • Reply 7 of 35
    Quote:

    Originally posted by ipodandimac

    what is Jabber?



    Jabber is a set of streaming XML protocols and technologies that enable any two entities on the Internet to exchange messages, presence, and other structured information in close to real time. The first Jabber application is an instant messaging (IM) network that offers functionality similar to legacy IM services such as AIM, ICQ, MSN, and Yahoo.



    Click the link for more information.
  • Reply 8 of 35
    There is also information on the Tiger website about Jabber support. It's just not obvious unless you read the text.



    http://www.apple.com/server/macosx/tiger/
  • Reply 9 of 35
    Give me the ability to chat with Yahoo and MSN members...then we'll talk. Until then, I'm using Fire.
  • Reply 10 of 35
    ajmasajmas Posts: 555member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by macslut

    Give me the ability to chat with Yahoo and MSN members...then we'll talk. Until then, I'm using Fire.



    For those of you not wanting to follow the links:



    Jabber, which is supported by Fire (amongst others), is yet another instant messenger (IM) solution, but with a difference. Instead of connecting to a single central IM provider, such as Yahoo, MSN or ICQ, each domain can provide their own server, in much the same way as e-mail. Imagine you have a company with an address myco.com, your address would be at myco.com, for example [email protected]. If you then want to chat with Marc at eden.net then you would type [email protected]. You local jabber server would talk to the other Jabber server to establish the communication.



    The other important difference between Jabber and the other IM solutions is that Jabber is open. This means you can use your favourite client and not fear that you will be cut off because the controlling entity has changed their protocol to lock the rest out (MSN and Yahoo have both done this). If your client does not yet support it, then the developers just need to follow the specifications of the protocol to implement it and not need to reverse-engineer it.
  • Reply 11 of 35
    tinktink Posts: 395member
    I use MSN Messenger.



    Unfortunately, most folks are using MSN messenger especially at work and Internationally.



    I hope iChat gets MSN Messenger support via Jabber, or however, so I can use it for messages (and hopefully voice), with the MSN hordes. \
  • Reply 12 of 35
    Quote:

    Originally posted by tink

    I use MSN Messenger.



    Unfortunately, most folks are using MSN messenger especially at work and Internationally.



    I hope iChat gets MSN Messenger support via Jabber, or however, so I can use it for messages (and hopefully voice), with the MSN hordes. \




    For those who dont know, jabber servers have the ability to support IM protocols other than jabber. This is something that is installed on a per server basis. So users accessing a given jabber server can communicate with other clients ( MSN, AIM, Yahoo, IRC ) transparently. They just add them to their buddy list.



    Unfortunately, these plugin services are as susceptible to provider lock out as stand alone clients, and the jabber server needs to be kept up to date with fixes.
  • Reply 13 of 35
    Quote:

    Originally posted by tink

    I use MSN Messenger.



    Unfortunately, most folks are using MSN messenger especially at work and Internationally.



    I hope iChat gets MSN Messenger support via Jabber, or however, so I can use it for messages (and hopefully voice), with the MSN hordes. \




    Personally, I don't know anyone who uses MSN Messenger.
  • Reply 14 of 35
    Quote:

    Originally posted by ajmas

    For those of you not wanting to follow the links:



    Jabber, which is supported by Fire (amongst others), is yet another instant messenger (IM) solution, but with a difference. Instead of connecting to a single central IM provider, such as Yahoo, MSN or ICQ, each domain can provide their own server, in much the same way as e-mail. Imagine you have a company with an address myco.com, your address would be at myco.com, for example [email protected]. If you then want to chat with Marc at eden.net then you would type [email protected]. You local jabber server would talk to the other Jabber server to establish the communication.



    The other important difference between Jabber and the other IM solutions is that Jabber is open. This means you can use your favourite client and not fear that you will be cut off because the controlling entity has changed their protocol to lock the rest out (MSN and Yahoo have both done this). If your client does not yet support it, then the developers just need to follow the specifications of the protocol to implement it and not need to reverse-engineer it.




    Right, and as I said before (which you chose to quote)...Give me the ability to chat with Yahoo and MSN members...then we'll talk. Until then, I'm using Fire.



    Fire is free and lets me chat with virtually anyone. There's no need to connect to a specific Jabber server that opens a gateway to another service (Yahoo, MSN, etc...)



    If all my ISPs offer free access to Jabber servers, and those servers are open to Yahoo, MSN, etc, then great, I'll start using iChat. Until then, it's Fire.
  • Reply 15 of 35
    Quote:

    Originally posted by stingerman

    Personally, I don't know anyone who uses MSN Messenger.



    I wish I could say the same. Personally, I hardly know anyone who uses iChat/AOL.
  • Reply 16 of 35
    My main beef is that video is not (yet?) available on aMSN, dMSN, Fire etc. It seems that the only Mac IMs to offer video are Yahoo or iVisit and most people I know (who regrettably are PC users) don't use those but use MSN.

    It is a shame that MS have not provided a full version of thise IM for Mac.
  • Reply 17 of 35
    I find this typo funny:

    "iChat and Safari; allowing parents and educational institutes to *sensor* content and restrict access to minors and students".



    Sensoring content, sounds exciting, sensual

    Funny what comes to people's minds when they think of censorship What do you say, Mr. Freud ?

    Does the sensor come free with Tiger?



    Seriously though, this is a whole bunch of great news. I'm curious to see what will come out of the Jabber implementation...
  • Reply 18 of 35
    Quote:

    Originally posted by macslut

    Right, and as I said before (which you chose to quote)...Give me the ability to chat with Yahoo and MSN members...then we'll talk. Until then, I'm using Fire.



    Fire is free and lets me chat with virtually anyone. There's no need to connect to a specific Jabber server that opens a gateway to another service (Yahoo, MSN, etc...)



    If all my ISPs offer free access to Jabber servers, and those servers are open to Yahoo, MSN, etc, then great, I'll start using iChat. Until then, it's Fire.




    iChat will have the same capabilities as fire in Tiger. See:



    http://forums.macrumors.com/showpost...14&postcount=7



    Cheers Daniel
  • Reply 19 of 35
    Am I the only one who thinks it shouldn't be called 'Family Controls'? It could just as easily be for a network at school or home. And those are definitely not 'family'.
  • Reply 20 of 35
    Quote:

    Originally posted by dahacouk

    iChat will have the same capabilities as fire in Tiger. See:



    http://forums.macrumors.com/showpost...14&postcount=7



    Cheers Daniel




    Whoever tychay is, he's wrong. Jabber libraries are not what Adium, Proteus and Fire use to 'talk' to AIM, MSN, Yahoo.
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