Apple developing "Automator" Web site

Posted:
in macOS edited January 2014
Apple is reportedly developing a Web site to help promote its upcoming Automator workflow application.



Apple Computer is in the process of developing a resource Web site for its forthcoming "Automator" personal automation assistant, sources close to the computer company tell AppleInsider.



The new Web site is expected to be ready for operation in early 2005, about the same time the company plans to launch its next-generation Mac OS X Tiger operating system, which features the new Automator application.



Using Automator, users can create step-by-step "Workflow" scripts that draw upon a library of actions. Workflows can accomplish tasks ranging from filtering and renaming a batch of images to creating customized Mac OS X Finder actions.



Similar to Apple's iCal Web site, sources expect the Automator site to include helpful user tips and a section where users can submit or share their Automator creations.



Although the site has yet to debut, sources say it's slated to appear at www.apple.com/automator/.



Work on the initial release of Automator continues this month, as Apple refines the application and finalize its user interface. With the most recent builds of the application, the company has removed all script actions associated with its AppleWorks office suite, but provided no explanation.



Automator 1.0, along with Mac OS X 10.4 "Tiger," is set to debut in the first half of 2005, though unconfirmed reports have recently suggested Tiger could debut much earlier than previously anticipated.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 53
    hobbeshobbes Posts: 1,252member
    Ahem. CoughAppleWorkssuccessorwillatlastarrivethisMWSFah em.
  • Reply 2 of 53
    amorphamorph Posts: 7,112member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Hobbes

    Ahem. CoughAppleWorkssuccessorwillatlastarrivethisMWSFah em.







    And what that tells me is that all the system libraries that the next AW will basically be a container for will finally be in place.



    Between Core Data, Core Text, Core Video and Core Image and Core Whatever I Forgot to Mention, it has the potential to be a lovely thing indeed.



    The RTF, DOC and PDF support built into the system probably won't hurt either...
  • Reply 3 of 53
    tednditedndi Posts: 1,921member
    BOOM!
  • Reply 4 of 53
    Hooooray! (I hope you guys are right!)
  • Reply 5 of 53
    Please, Please, Please, Please....
  • Reply 6 of 53
    Yes, I think I'm looking forward to a new office suite more than 10.4 itself.
  • Reply 7 of 53
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Hobbes

    Ahem. CoughAppleWorkssuccessorwillatlastarrivethisMWSFah em.



    This seems like a fairly reasonable guess. Apple appears to be going the direction of pushing core functionality (pardon the pun) down into "Core" libraries. Then the applications like iMovie, iPhoto, iTunes, Safari, iWorks? simply become (relatively) thin UIs on top of those Core libraries.



    That's the dream anyway.
  • Reply 8 of 53
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Hobbes

    Ahem. CoughAppleWorkssuccessorwillatlastarrivethisMWSFah em.



    I hope that Apple jumps into OpenOffice with two feet.



    Apple's open source track record is strong... OpenOffice would be the cherry on top.
  • Reply 9 of 53
    Open Office is crap. Whatever new app they develop will be magnitudes better.
  • Reply 10 of 53
    OpenDoc? Is that you?... Did that meany OLE beat you up and was Apple not nice to you?



    Seriously... with the focus on XML and all of the work that is going into making word processing and spreadsheets trivial to implement, this could be a good time for an OpenDoc revival out of Apple. I am not going to hold my breath, but one can dream....
  • Reply 11 of 53
    buonrottobuonrotto Posts: 6,368member
    Cocoa = OpenDoc for (almost) all intents and purposes. Well, the APIs and umbrella frameworks are part of this too. I think Apple was well aware of this when they purchased NeXT in '97. At this point, I think Apple is showing that the idea of OpenDoc is, in modified, less-scary-to-developers'-business-models form, in effect now with these tools. I don't think we'll see OpenDoc outright though as these tools are probably more mature at this point than OpenDoc anyway. There was some buzz in the old OpenStep community of selling not applications but objects to users -- Cocoa objects, APIS, plug-ins, frameworks, etc.





    Ah, good ol' Stepwise.
  • Reply 12 of 53
    frank777frank777 Posts: 5,770member
    I've been waiting for a solid AppleWorks upgrade since what, The Great Blackout?



    At this point, I'll only believe it when I actually see it.
  • Reply 13 of 53
    With the time it has taken to come out with a new version of AppleWorks (or what ever they will call it) I'm guessing they started this project from scratch. Wasn't keynote made from scratch?
  • Reply 14 of 53
    frank777frank777 Posts: 5,770member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by FormatC2

    I hope that Apple jumps into OpenOffice with two feet.



    Apple's open source track record is strong... OpenOffice would be the cherry on top.




    But there is no way Apple spent all this time building those Text API features into Mac OS X to go and launch an Open Office distro.



    If they actually do anything with OO, they will adopt the file format, that's it.
  • Reply 15 of 53
    buonrottobuonrotto Posts: 6,368member
    I think Apple adds software like Keynote when they're convinced developers aren't quite "getting it." Motion and Keynote are each a kind of proof of concept for their respective technologies. I'm not so sure Apple feels the same way about their text objects and APIs. There seem to be enough developers who have adopted and extended these tools. Of course, I wouldn't be shocked if some day they do make a real word processor if these efforts go nowhere in the land of third parties.
  • Reply 16 of 53
    Quote:

    Originally posted by BuonRotto

    Cocoa = OpenDoc for (almost) all intents and purposes. Well, the APIs and umbrella frameworks are part of this too.



    I think you are a bit off base on this one. OpenDoc was all about having a single document format and allowing third parties to add their own document portions and the plug-ins to read that format. There was also a set of API's to allow some standardization of common "section" formats (like text) to allow interaction and another API to allow for controls and display of that portion. Think of it sort of like turning a document into a bowl of soup where anyone can todd their ingredient in.



    You would have to quint really hard to see the Cocoa API's in that. The closest I can come is trying to make NSViews look like this idea... or NSCell... but both of those are compile-time similarities... nothing really like OpenDoc.





    The big thing that killed OpenDoc was that in order to view any document you had to have all of the components to view it, and no component ever got enough critical mass to be really valuable. Same problem that Word processors have now against Word, but generalized across all of the components.



    However, I think that things have settled down enough at this point that you could build in a basic set of components and then encourage people to sub-class those components to build better ideas, but still allow people without the newer components to view something through the base class... pie in the sky, but a neat idea. Oh... and I see no evidence of this thinking at Apple.
  • Reply 17 of 53
    Quote:

    Originally posted by BuonRotto

    I think Apple adds software like Keynote when they're convinced developers aren't quite "getting it." Motion and Keynote are each a kind of proof of concept for their respective technologies. I'm not so sure Apple feels the same way about their text objects and APIs. There seem to be enough developers who have adopted and extended these tools. Of course, I wouldn't be shocked if some day they do make a real word processor if these efforts go nowhere in the land of third parties.



    I'm not so sure I see things this way. First off, yes I think Apple makes apps when they see an opportunity or need. However, I think they make them to dominate or at least hold their own in the market-not just to kick start developers.



    Second, I think MS office is stale and really hasn't gotten better in a long time. Keynote made many inprovements over PowerPoint IMHO, I think an office suite taking after keynote would bring back elegance and simplicity that has been missing for some time. I'm hoping for something in between MS Office and InDesign. Soemthing that fits well with SOHO, teachers and such.
  • Reply 18 of 53
    buonrottobuonrotto Posts: 6,368member
    I think conceptually, Cocoa provides much of what openDoc promised, however differently they are packaged. Yeah, they've given up on any idea of a common file format or backbone. But the idea of providing a consistent set of tools that the user can apply to any document in many contexts I think is alive and thriving. At some point, it runs into the a problem of having applications of containers, so the plug-in architecture and standard UI elements, and a more powerful pasteboard is about as close as you're going to get without somehow having all developers outside of Cupertino change how they not only create their products but also market and pay for their development. For the most part, OS X is going to afford much of what the ultimate goal of openDoc was trying to provide without having to somehow strong-arm developers to turn their businesses upside down, some of whom are bigger than Apple.



    I don't mean to say that Apple develops software only as a proof of concept. But I do think they hang back in some cases to see how thing go, especially if the product doesn't fill an internal desire or need, and if the software isn't a major piece of their long-term growth strategy. I don't think a word processor is a primary concern as far their a long-term strategy, no matter if people want an Office competitor, and I don't think Keynote was either strictly a pet project for Steve nor a missing piece of many people's software arsenal.
  • Reply 19 of 53
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Thinine

    Open Office is crap. Whatever new app they develop will be magnitudes better.



    KHTML wasn't the best thing in the world either, but Apple started with it as a base, and worked hard on it and it became Safari.



    I agree with the file format angle also. If everyone but M$ used the OpenOffice format, who really cares what "frontend" you use to produce the files.
  • Reply 20 of 53
    louzerlouzer Posts: 1,054member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by FormatC2

    KHTML wasn't the best thing in the world either, but Apple started with it as a base, and worked hard on it and it became Safari.



    I agree with the file format angle also. If everyone but M$ used the OpenOffice format, who really cares what "frontend" you use to produce the files.




    Which indicates what they should really do: Dump Aqua and implement a kick-ass build of KDE for Darwin!
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