Academic versions of software

Posted:
in Current Mac Hardware edited January 2014
I'm currently attending college at night and thinking about switching over from PC to a Mac. The Educational Apple Instant Loan has great rates so I'm considering getting a G3 to use at home and a new 12inch Powerbook to take to class.



According to the Apple rep, the Academic versions of the software (like Office X or Virtual PC) are 'supposed' to be used on only one machine, which would mean I could install it either on the G3 or the Powerbook but not both. If I wanted it on both machines, I'd have to buy two copies. Having to do that seems rather rediculous. Does anyone with Academic version software know if the software has security codes or other other functions that would prevent me from installing it on both machines? I suppose I could buy the non-Academic software at the Apple store and then install it on both machines. The price would probably come out near the same either way.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 23
    No, it doesnt prevent you from installing on two machines. I have a TiBook and a Dual 1Ghz PowerMac. I use my PM for intense video editing and Photoshop and my PB for showing stuff to clients and for bringing work to class. There is NO WAY I am paying for two copies of Final Cut or Photoshop so I just installed them on both of my machines. I am sure this isn't a problem considering I am not installing the same liscense on a lab full of computers. I would think that exclusive personal use of the software YOU purchase is your business.
  • Reply 2 of 23
    In 95% of cases, the only difference between an academic version and the consumer version of a software package is the price and the fact that you have to have a university ID to purchase the academic version. Other than that the terms of license, packaging, etc. is identical. I doubt you'll be risking much by purchasing 1 copy of Office for both computers since you typically would only be using one at a time. In terms of codes and such that would block you from installing, I have never come across any.



    Congrats on the switch.
  • Reply 3 of 23
    [quote]Originally posted by EdinLA43:

    <strong>

    Does anyone with Academic version software know if the software has security codes or other other functions that would prevent me from installing it on both machines?</strong><hr></blockquote>



    Office X polls to see if another installation activated with the same code is present. If another copy is running on the same network, then the second copy will quit.



    This happens if the two computers are on the same network, including a wireless network. Either copy will work fine when the computers are not connected.
  • Reply 4 of 23
    torifiletorifile Posts: 4,024member
    WTF happened to my post? Oh well, others have answered it just as well.



    There are ways to circumvent the copy protection on office... you'll have to find those on your own, though.



    edit: Oh! You posted the same exact thread in 2 forums. Not cool. You confused the hell outta me. Maybe this one could be locked to prevent confusion (and considering it's in the wrong forum and would have to be moved anyway... I need to be a moderator )



    [ 02-23-2003: Message edited by: torifile ]</p>
  • Reply 5 of 23
    I initially posted it here, then realized it was the wrong forum so I posted it on the software one. I tried to delete this one but I couldn't because I'm not a moderator. Sorry for the double post. I'm new to these types of forums.



    Perhaps one of the moderators can move this whole thing to the software forum where it belongs.



    [ 02-23-2003: Message edited by: EdinLA43 ]</p>
  • Reply 6 of 23
    [quote]Originally posted by Skipjack:

    <strong>



    Office X polls to see if another installation activated with the same code is present. If another copy is running on the same network, then the second copy will quit.



    This happens if the two computers are on the same network, including a wireless network. Either copy will work fine when the computers are not connected.</strong><hr></blockquote>



    That's the problem. I have a Linksys router with a network. I'd have my old Windows machine on it, and I'd have the new G3 and Powerbook on there too. I'd want to be able to send Office X files back and forth between the two. Both Macs would be turned on at the same time but I probably wouldn't have Office X open on both machines at the same time. I don't know if the Office X would know if there was another installation there if the computer was on but no Office X apps running. What a hassle.



    [ 02-23-2003: Message edited by: EdinLA43 ]</p>
  • Reply 7 of 23
    Stay away from AppleLoans, you could get a better deal from your friendly local mafia family.
  • Reply 8 of 23
    [quote]Originally posted by Stagflation Steve:

    <strong>Stay away from AppleLoans, you could get a better deal from your friendly local mafia family.</strong><hr></blockquote>



    What makes you say that? Doesn't MBNA(?) handle the financing? The interest rate is 9.99%, which isn't that bad. And with the educational loan, you only have to pay the interest for the first two years, even though I'd be paying it off much sooner, I'd still have the flexibility to only pay the minimum.
  • Reply 9 of 23
    [quote]Originally posted by EdinLA43:

    <strong>



    That's the problem. I have a Linksys router with a network. I'd have my old Windows machine on it, and I'd have the new G3 and Powerbook on there too. I'd want to be able to send Office X files back and forth between the two. Both Macs would be turned on at the same time but I probably wouldn't have Office X open on both machines at the same time. I don't know if the Office X would know if there was another installation there if the computer was on but no Office X apps running. What a hassle.



    [ 02-23-2003: Message edited by: EdinLA43 ]</strong><hr></blockquote>



    There shouldn't be a problem as long as Office X isn't active on both machines. And file-sharing will still work regardless of Office X's status.



    Anyway, I heard that this network check has be disabled with recent versions, though I may very well be wrong.



    As for installing single-license software on multiple machines, you're not supposed to do it with commercial versions on any other platforms either.
  • Reply 10 of 23
  • Reply 11 of 23
    eugeneeugene Posts: 8,254member
    A typical EULA doesn't prevent you from installing software on multiple machines. It just prevents you from using it on multiple machines at the same time.



    Typically, academic licenses are also supposed to be used only for academic purposes too, but nobody does that...
  • Reply 12 of 23
    scottscott Posts: 7,431member
    My campus has a site license for Office (for example). You can install it for free or buy the CD for $40. So ... unlimited installs. See if yours has the same thing.
  • Reply 13 of 23
    [quote]Originally posted by EdinLA43:

    <strong>



    What makes you say that? Doesn't MBNA(?) handle the financing? The interest rate is 9.99%, which isn't that bad. And with the educational loan, you only have to pay the interest for the first two years, even though I'd be paying it off much sooner, I'd still have the flexibility to only pay the minimum.</strong><hr></blockquote>



    Read the fine print dude,
  • Reply 14 of 23
    [quote]Originally posted by Stagflation Steve:

    <strong>



    Read the fine print dude,</strong><hr></blockquote>



    I agree, the fine print could be scary. Interest rate can be between 10-27% but that's the only scary thing I found. The nice thing for me is that the first two years you pay interest only and you can pay it off as fast as you want, so if I plan to pay it off within those two years, it's a great deal. I suppose you won't find out what your interest rate will be until you apply and if it's too high, you don't have to take out the loan. I guess the alternative is to open a credit card account. For a student like me, it's hard to come up with a big chunk of cash.
  • Reply 15 of 23
    [quote]Originally posted by Scott:

    <strong>My campus has a site license for Office (for example). You can install it for free or buy the CD for $40. So ... unlimited installs. See if yours has the same thing.</strong><hr></blockquote>



    Great suggestion Scott. I'll check it out next time I'm in the computer lab.
  • Reply 16 of 23
    [quote]Originally posted by EdinLA43:

    <strong>



    Great suggestion Scott. I'll check it out next time I'm in the computer lab.</strong><hr></blockquote>



    I'd look in the bookstore. Sometimes this program isn't advertized very well. My school's bookstore has a link on their website, and in the store itself, it just has a list taped to the wall right next to the academic priced versions. Many people don't notice the list and buy the boxed versions. There's a flyer with all the products, prices, and details, but it is at the customer service counter, which isn't very close to the computer/software section.
  • Reply 17 of 23
    Office v.X cost me $6.78. I just bought it three days ago. I figured for the price of McDonalds why the heck not. Right? They also have all the M$ OSes for under $8.00. I wonder now if they will have VPC I will be the first in line.



    [email protected]
  • Reply 18 of 23
    tomjtomj Posts: 120member
    the minimum intereste 9.99%, which you can't get, and if you could, you'd be able to buy the machines outright. Also, the education loans makes you pay off the interest first, which mean you will pay the maximum amount [period, full stop]. even if you get the student loan, and the next day you come up with the money that the computers would have cost and you pay it, you still have to pay the interest, it's better to just get the normal loan and pay it off as soon as you can you can avoid to interest to a point that way, and if you pay it off fast enough you can avoid some of the interest, hopefully making it cheaper overall than the student loan
  • Reply 19 of 23
    [quote]Originally posted by Estevan2737:

    <strong>In terms of codes and such that would block you from installing, I have never come across any.</strong><hr></blockquote>





    I have - Sibelius, the Music notation software. I have the full version, - at a price similar to final cut pro! This generates a code based on the hardware/software makeup of the computer. You have to register your computer's code, and you have then to go through a process of typing codes between the computer and another that you want to transfer the license to. I don't know what I'd do if my HD wiped out - I think I'd shout at the company until they gave me another code.



    Great piece of software, though - should use it more!



    David
  • Reply 20 of 23
    torifiletorifile Posts: 4,024member
    I think that Stone Studio and the makers of TIFFany (I can't remember the company's name right now) also do this. And some of the ambrosia software does something similar but I'm not sure exactly what it is. It's a good thing they don't make crap products, otherwise people wouldn't put up with it.
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