London News: Post Experiences, Discussion Here

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  • Reply 81 of 170
    powerdocpowerdoc Posts: 8,123member
    Condolences to the Londoners.

    I am happy to see that our AI members living in London are in good shape.
  • Reply 82 of 170
    naplesxnaplesx Posts: 3,743member
    Good to hear you're OK Midwinter.



    That's good news.



    Stay safe.
  • Reply 83 of 170
    jonnybjonnyb Posts: 64member
    I work at the British Medical Association where the bus bomb exploded. I was in a meeting at the front of the building. Adjacent to this room is a balcony that overlooks Woburn Place and Tavistock Square. When he heard the blast we all ran out onto the balcony and saw the bus with its roof ripped off.



    There were survivors clambering over the seats of the top deck trying to escape and I particularly noticed one woman unconcious on the road curled up in a foetal position. I don't know what happened to her. There were clearly some dead people there.



    The bus had been diverted down this street past BMA House because of the earlier bomb at Kings Cross. Because of this the many doctors in BMA house were able to provide treatment inside the building which became a triage centre. This may have saved people's lives.



    It was a surreal and dreadful sight. I walked all the way home to north London and was still shaking when I got there. I have never been so glad to arrive home in my life. I dread to think of the friends and relatives of those people who won't be coming home
  • Reply 84 of 170
    That is a chilling account jonnyb. Thanks for sharing it. Interestingly, while I was reading your post I heard a report on the radio about how the bus was in front of a building full of Drs.



    Best to all of you



    Moe
  • Reply 85 of 170
    mimacmimac Posts: 871member
    Good to hear all you guys are safe.



    Watching events on TV as they unfolded much of the day... dreadful scenes, although an eerie sense of calm seems to pervade the people on the streets.

    The emergency services seem to have done an excellent job in responding quickly and effectively.



    My condolences to all who have been affected by this terrible act.
  • Reply 86 of 170
    alex londonalex london Posts: 613member
    jonnyb, what a horrible thing to witness, many thanks for giving us a vivid account. I had just seen new post-atrocity footage and I too saw a woman on the road in that position, as if tucked up in bed. The horror.
  • Reply 87 of 170
    audiopollutionaudiopollution Posts: 3,226member
    My brain hurts.



    I've spoken to many of my friends in London today, all of them safe and well. I trust that we can all remain as objective about this as my friends and those on AI who have reported their experiences in the thick of it.



    I don't feel any anger. I have, however, slipped back into the sadness that followed the 9/11 tragedy.



    My best to all those affected, however remotely. I hope you can sleep well tonight. My thoughts, and those of my family, are with you.



    Ian (ex-pat from Liverpool)
  • Reply 88 of 170
    dmzdmz Posts: 5,775member
    Surprised by joy--impatient as the wind

    I turned to share the transport - Oh! with whom

    But Thee, deep buried in the silent tomb,

    That spot which no vicissitude can find?

    Love, faithful love, recalled thee to my mind -

    But how could I forget thee? Through what power,

    Even for the least division of an hour,

    Have I been so beguiled as to be blind

    To my most grievous loss? - That thought's return

    Was the worst pang that sorrow ever bore

    Save one, one only, when I stood forlorn,

    Knowing my heart's best treasure was no more;

    That neither present time, nor years unborn,

    Could to my sight that heavenly face restore.



    William Wordsworth
  • Reply 89 of 170
    skatmanskatman Posts: 609member
    Quote:

    Why is anger a bad thing to feel when innocent people are slaughtered?



    Because anger doesn't make you stronger.

    It makes you blind!



    Anger will tell you to blame the terrorists.



    Logic should tell you to blame security services of England for not reventing such a massive undertaking.

    If Tony Blair was a good leader he would, first of all, start an investigation as to why security services of the country are incompetent.
  • Reply 90 of 170
    jimmacjimmac Posts: 11,898member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by powermacG6

    terrorism doesn't work if you dont allow it to terrorize you.



    This is the most sane thing I've heard about this incident. The worst thing about this would be to let it turn into something else. That would be just giving them what they ( The terrorists ) want.



    Also I know this is a bit redundant but truly a sad, dispicable, and cowardly crime. However if I know the british they won't let this get to them.
  • Reply 91 of 170
    tulkastulkas Posts: 3,754member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by skatman

    Because anger doesn't make you stronger.

    It makes you blind!



    Anger will tell you to blame the terrorists.





    As would common sense



    Quote:

    Originally posted by skatman



    Logic should tell you to blame security services of England for not reventing such a massive undertaking.

    If Tony Blair was a good leader he would, first of all, start an investigation as to why security services of the country are incompetent.




    Might you then blame the victims next?









    Condolences to any affected by this.
  • Reply 92 of 170
    johnqjohnq Posts: 2,763member
    "Righteous indignation" is an oxymoron. There is no virtuous anger...anger is defeat.



    Anger caused today's violence.



    Why do you want to give in to animalistic mob mentality? That solves nothing.



    Easy for me to say? Sure. But we all have seen people want revenge and when they get it they feel like crap all the more. There is no "closure" with revenge, it's a lie.



    Better to honor your dead and injured by keeping a cool head and letting the justice and democratic processes work, instead of resorting to lynchings and vengeful genocides.



    Be better than your enemies. What don't you get about that, NaplesX? <rhetorical, don't bother answering>
  • Reply 93 of 170
    tulkastulkas Posts: 3,754member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by johnq

    "Righteous indignation" is an oxymoron. There is no virtuous anger...anger is defeat.



    Anger caused today's violence.



    Why do you want to give in to animalistic mob mentality? That solves nothing.



    Easy for me to say? Sure. But we all have seen people want revenge and when they get it they feel like crap all the more. There is no "closure" with revenge, it's a lie.



    Better to honor your dead and injured by keeping a cool head and letting the justice and democratic processes work, instead of resorting to lynchings and vengeful genocides.



    Be better than your enemies. What don't you get about that?




    Anger is a normal a natural reaction. Anger does not mean lynching. Anger does not mean vengence. Anger means you are human.



    You are right, though, it is better let the process work. Mobs do not work. But, mobs are not representative of anger. Mobs generally represent hate. What is destructive is when anger turns to hatred.



    I am always confused by people who feel that westeners are not allowed to feel anger. All other groups are excused for feeling anger. Odd.



    Having said that, I fully understand people being too sad, stunned or numb to feel anything else, even anger.
  • Reply 94 of 170
    audiopollutionaudiopollution Posts: 3,226member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by NaplesX

    I am puzzled why there is no anger. Why is anger a bad thing to feel when innocent people are slaughtered?



    Righteous indignation is a powerful force and appropriate at this time. I am not getting this avoidance of anger.



    Am I missing something?




    Who do I get angry at?



    Yeah, I know the easy answer. The immediate emotion. Them.



    It's not that easy, though, for me. This did not occur in a vacuum. Like that chaos theory example (of a butterfly on one side of the world fluttering away and that motion setting in place the conditions on the other side of the world for a tornado), the motivations for actions such as these are complex, largely immeasurable, and partially bullshit and conjecture. I don't want to make my judgements based on the outcome when I know that there were many things that contributed to it - many things I will never know or understand to a level that I feel I could base an objective conclusion on.



    I don't get angry because blame is to be apportioned among many parties.



    I'm sad because I'm sentimental. I'm sad because the world becomes less of a shiny colourful place each day. I'm sad because, while I once had a great desire to raise children, I don't feel that way any more. I'm sad because people who may have held more hope, than me, have perished. I'm sad because, each time something happens, I come to a greater realization that the medicine that the world needs is going to taste incredibly bitter.



    I think sadness is a far deeper emotion than anger.



    I don't know what else to say about why I feel the way I do.



    I do know that I don't want to hate.
  • Reply 95 of 170
    johnqjohnq Posts: 2,763member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Tulkas

    Anger is a normal a natural reaction. Anger does not mean lynching. Anger does not mean vengence. Anger means you are human.



    I'm only talking about acting upon one's all-too-natural anger. No one makes good decisions when angry, be it a person, group or nation. Ride the emotions out and take it all in and take some time to come up with more rational responses, ones that might avoid cyclical violence.



    The world and humanity is still beautiful. This can't change that. Look at all the doctors and rescue personnel and people helping eachother. This event makes life even more precious, no? Clinging to the notion of safety or permanence - assuming everything will be fine forever, is what makes these events all the more shocking. We think "Oh, I guess world affairs can affect me afterall". We need to remember death is a possibility at any instant (from whatever cause), so treat people well at all times and don't put things off. Fight for those things you think will make a difference. Vote your conscience even if your guy/gal loses. etc.



    Pessimism and anger...throw them out. Be constructive.
  • Reply 96 of 170
    Quote:

    Originally posted by NaplesX

    Once again I am at a loss.



    I hate evil. I hate evil acts.



    Hate is not in and of itself a bad thing.



    A person can be both angry and hate the evil acts and still act in a rational way.



    How do you know what to love if you don't know what you hate - and vise versa?




    I didn't say I don't hate. I said I don't want to. I believe that hate is a waste of my energy. Although I am prone to feel it, I think that the worlds hate bucket is full enough already.



    Sadness overrides anger, in my case.



    I do know what I love and I hold those things very close.
  • Reply 97 of 170
    johnqjohnq Posts: 2,763member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by NaplesX

    Once again I am at a loss.



    I hate evil. I hate evil acts.



    Hate is not in and of itself a bad thing.



    A person can be both angry and hate the evil acts and still act in a rational way.



    How do you know what to love if you don't know what you hate - and vise versa?




    Hating "evil" is useless. If a man throws a rock at a dog, the dog will bark at the rock and not the man. The dog isn't seeing the true cause, only the superficial cause for his pain.



    We need to "fight" and"kill" the underlying causes of evil, violent acts, which are powerlessness, greed, ignorance, poverty, disease, etc. Not the people living under these conditions, but the conditions themselves.



    Hate is only a bad thing. It is a wallowing in a chemical reaction, a high from feeling abused by another. It is addictive and deceptive. It solves exactly nothing.



    A person cannot be angry and still act in a rational way. That is the drug of hate talking, conning you into thinking it's ok. Like alcoholism's innocent whisper of "go ahead, what harm will having a few drinks do?"



    You can repudiate evil acts with all your heart but it is with the wisdom of the superiority of reason and love, not with hate. Otherwise, you're the same as your enemies.
  • Reply 98 of 170
    groveratgroverat Posts: 10,872member
    Let me say it again.



    Keep all discussion in this thread to positivity and condolensces. If that's not what is in your post, expect it to be edited or deleted.
  • Reply 99 of 170
    benjamin_rbenjamin_r Posts: 265member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by johnq

    Hating "evil" is useless. If a man throws a rock at a dog, the dog will bark at the rock and not the man. The dog isn't seeing the true cause, only the superficial cause for his pain.



    We need to "fight" and"kill" the underlying causes of evil, violent acts, which are powerlessness, greed, ignorance, poverty, disease, etc. Not the people living under these conditions, but the conditions themselves.







    Never a truer word said.



    A big hug to all those Londoner's who are dealing with this tragic event.



    b.
  • Reply 100 of 170
    sunilramansunilraman Posts: 8,133member
    my brother and fiancee arrive in heathrow in 1 hour. they'll be commencing jobs, flat hunting very soon and all that stuff with their new work visas (after doing the work-travel thing)



    all the best to them and all londoners, brits, europeans and all others who have made that city a place to call their home.



    just remember that terrorism is for the most part an act of desperation. it could get more insidious, but as you can see the world is starting to see it for what it is...
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