SED- the next technology for HD displays?

Posted:
in Future Apple Hardware edited January 2014
from a Canon web site:

Large flat-screen televisions for digital broadcasting are currently the focus of much attention. Heralded as the new generation of high-quality large flat-screen display, the SED (Surface-conduction Electron-emitter Display), jointly developed by Canon and Toshiba Corporation, is almost ready for practical application. Its greatest feature is the ability to produce vivid color images that surpass conventional types of display. Also, the SED delivers exceptional overall image quality?fast video-response performance, high contrast, high gradation levels?and low power consumption.



more at http://www.canon.com/technology/display/



these things are supposed to start appearing in 2006, gamers (in particular) may drool all over these them (the brightness and fps of CRTs but the snazzy appearance of flat panels)
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 44
    Quote:

    Originally posted by halse

    from a Canon web site:

    Large flat-screen televisions for digital broadcasting are currently the focus of much attention. Heralded as the new generation of high-quality large flat-screen display, the SED (Surface-conduction Electron-emitter Display), jointly developed by Canon and Toshiba Corporation, is almost ready for practical application. Its greatest feature is the ability to produce vivid color images that surpass conventional types of display. Also, the SED delivers exceptional overall image quality?fast video-response performance, high contrast, high gradation levels?and low power consumption.



    more at http://www.canon.com/technology/display/



    these things are supposed to start appearing in 2006, gamers (in particular) may drool all over these them (the brightness and fps of CRTs but the snazzy appearance of flat panels)




    I was reading about these the other week. I was all ready to buy a big-arse plasma for my apartment, but now I think I better wait. They sound great.



    I did however read that outside of limited release in Japan we won't see any on the market until 2007...
  • Reply 2 of 44
    Quote:

    Originally posted by halse

    from a Canon web site:

    Large flat-screen televisions for digital broadcasting are currently the focus of much attention. Heralded as the new generation of high-quality large flat-screen display, the SED (Surface-conduction Electron-emitter Display), jointly developed by Canon and Toshiba Corporation, is almost ready for practical application.




    Yeah, read about these to!



    CRT without the tube and without the flickering. Read somewhere else about Samsung (?) developing the same kind of display, but then using nanotubes as the electron-emitter. Here they are using a more conventional technique:



    "The key to the electron emitters, at the heart of the SED, is an extremely narrow slit several nanometers wide between two electric poles. Electrons are emitted from one side of the slit when approximately 10V of electricity are applied. Some of these electrons are scattered at the other side of the slit and accelerated by the voltage (approximately 10 kV) applied between the glass substrates"



    Curious who will bring these to market first.
  • Reply 3 of 44
    mellomello Posts: 555member
    How much though? If it costs 8 grand I'll just gonna pick up Samsung's 1080p

    dlp for 4 grand.
  • Reply 4 of 44
    Quote:

    Originally posted by mello

    How much though? If it costs 8 grand I'll just gonna pick up Samsung's 1080p

    dlp for 4 grand.




    There will always be some great new technology off on the horizon. Buy the proven technology now, rather than waiting a year or two and then being the early adopter.



    Plasma screens have dropped 50% in price over the last year, and they are 8th generation - so you know that they will be more reliable than this new stuff that you can't even buy yet.



    I am going to buy a 50" panasonic plasma in Janruary.
  • Reply 5 of 44
    Quote:

    There will always be some great new technology off on the horizon. Buy the proven technology now, rather than waiting a year or two and then being the early adopter.



    Plasma screens have dropped 50% in price over the last year, and they are 8th generation - so you know that they will be more reliable than this new stuff that you can't even buy yet.



    I am going to buy a 50" panasonic plasma in Janruary. [/B]



    The two main reasons that I'm going to be choosing a DLP over a Plasma are:



    1) Burn in.

    2) The finite life of the plasma itself. The longer you watch the darker the

    picture will be.



    Now I heard that screen burn-in is less of an issue with the new plasmas but I

    normally have my tv on for 5+ hours a day. I'd prefer to replace the bulb on a

    dlp for $250 then having to replace a plasma after 3-4 years.
  • Reply 6 of 44
    Quote:

    Originally posted by mello

    The two main reasons that I'm going to be choosing a DLP over a Plasma are:



    1) Burn in.

    2) The finite life of the plasma itself. The longer you watch the darker the

    picture will be.



    Now I heard that screen burn-in is less of an issue with the new plasmas but I

    normally have my tv on for 5+ hours a day. I'd prefer to replace the bulb on a

    dlp for $250 then having to replace a plasma after 3-4 years.




    Half life on the new Plasmas is 60,000 hours (in your case 32 years). They have fixed the burn in with pixel shifting, so that plasmas are used all the time for static commercial displays.



    Also, Front projection DLP (like all front projection) is no good in rooms with any light, and rear-projection DLP is lousy pictures and a big cabinet. I would rather have one of the Sony 40" CRTs than a DLP rear projection cabinet, if you can still find a new one.
  • Reply 7 of 44
    mellomello Posts: 555member
    Quote:

    Half life on the new Plasmas is 60,000 hours (in your case 32 years).



    This is interesting info that I haven't heard before. Are there any 1080p

    plasmas out now or do you think those will show up when the PS3 comes out?
  • Reply 8 of 44
    e1618978e1618978 Posts: 6,073member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by mello

    This is interesting info that I haven't heard before. Are there any 1080p

    plasmas out now or do you think those will show up when the PS3 comes out?




    The plasma that I am thinking of getting is 1366x768 (Panasonic 50"). There are 1080p plasmas - mainly in the 65" size I think.



    I don't know that much about 1080p on DLP - but a google search indicates that it only launched on Sept 8th -



    http://www.projectorcentral.com/news_story_839.htm



    I found a bunch of DLP rear projectors for sale that state 1080p, and is seems a little early (2 weeks after launch) for so many products to be available. You probably want to look at the spec sheet pretty carefully (they may mean "virtual 1080p" or something). I think Samsung made a DLP chip that was 960 mirrors wide, and interlaced it so that each mirror displayed two pixels, so they called it 1080p, but it was really just a wierd kind of 1080i.



    Viewing angle, and lack of light reflection is better on Plasma. One guy was saying that you need to put a UPS on DLP TVs, so that you don't have bulb failure when the fan stops blowing during a power outage.



    There is an alternative technology to DLP - D-ILA, which was better than DLP a couple of years ago (I don't know how they compare now).

  • Reply 9 of 44
    Quote:

    Originally posted by dutch pear

    Yeah, read about these to!



    CRT without the tube and without the flickering. Read somewhere else about Samsung (?) developing the same kind of display, but then using nanotubes as the electron-emitter. Here they are using a more conventional technique:




    The carbon nanotube displays are called FED and are supposed to be commercially available in 2006. There was an article recently over at news.com.com.com.com...
  • Reply 10 of 44
    Quote:

    Originally posted by curmi

    I did however read that outside of limited release in Japan we won't see any on the market until 2007...



    i heard the same... they would be awesome if they came out though
  • Reply 11 of 44
    mellomello Posts: 555member
    Anyone heard about Sharp's new 1,000,000,00 to 1 contrast LCD yet?

    Here's the link.



    There is also a new 50" Toshiba SED that's supposed to come out next year.

    Here is the link from Engadget.



    Does anyone have any other info about this Toshiba? The article says that it

    uses 1/3 the power of plasmas but not much more. I was checking online &

    found out that it has:



    1080p picture

    100,000 to 1 contrast

    Thin screen like plasma & lcd

    50" diagonal screen



    What I haven't found out:



    Price (hopefully comparable to DLP's)

    model number

    1080p HMDI input

    U.S. release date (hopefully around the PS3 release)

    If there is a chance of burn-in (like plasmas)

    How the picture looks in a well-lit room
  • Reply 12 of 44
    telomartelomar Posts: 1,804member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by mello

    How the picture looks in a well-lit room



    Similar to plasmas and CRTs. Because it uses phospors it doesn't have the issues of LCDs.
  • Reply 13 of 44
    fieldorfieldor Posts: 213member
    Posted it on General discussion, but it is actually Future hardware:

    For those who are interested in SED and understand french or use translate tools, the had a quick comparison during a Canon show or some sort.

    http://www.hardware.fr/articles/593-...-type-sed.html
  • Reply 13 of 44
    fieldorfieldor Posts: 213member
    double post
  • Reply 15 of 44
    SED technology looks a lot like how plasma TVs work (and a bit like old CRT TVs too)... a plasma TV has "plasma" i.e. ionized gas inside the gap between the surface emitting and the surface receiving (the display) an electric discharge? And what is an "electric discharge" but electrons moving along a path in a conductive medium? It appears to me that SED replaces plasma by vacuum, and electric discharges by fine-controlled electron beams. Finally, it's all about emitted electrons striking a wall and exciting (illuminating) its surface.
  • Reply 16 of 44
    kidredkidred Posts: 2,402member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by mello

    The two main reasons that I'm going to be choosing a DLP over a Plasma are:



    1) Burn in.

    2) The finite life of the plasma itself. The longer you watch the darker the

    picture will be.



    Now I heard that screen burn-in is less of an issue with the new plasmas but I

    normally have my tv on for 5+ hours a day. I'd prefer to replace the bulb on a

    dlp for $250 then having to replace a plasma after 3-4 years.






    Plasmas will last 14 years or so, long enough for you to want to place it. If they only lasted 3-4 don't you think there's be millions of pissed off people suing, petitioning, picketing that their $5k plasma died? Stop spreading fud.



    Unless of course you, your better half, kids, friends, family anyone who will watch the set see the rainbows or get headaches from archaic spinning color wheel.



    on topic- SED is years off, from being functional, available and affordable. It's cool to read about but it's vaporware.
  • Reply 17 of 44
    Vaporware? Well, if you talk about "affordable" SEDs, yes... but for functional, available (and expensive) ones, Toshiba is shifting entire parts of their TV line production units to SED technlogy now, at the Himeji factory, Hiratsuka, Japan, with the help of Canon in their $1.9 billion joint-venture "SED Inc."



    Some official information :

    - "Canon, Toshiba to create joint venture for next-generation flat-screen SED panels" at Canon.com, September 14th, 2004.

    - "TOSHIBA SELECTS HIMEJI AS CANDIDATE SITE TO MASS-PRODUCE SED PANELS" at Toshiba.com, May 31, 2005.

    - "Toshiba Selects Himeji as Candidate site to Mass Produce SEDs" at Canon.com, June 2nd, 2005.



    What is also known (web sites and talks with Toshiba and Canon representatives): SED inc. is testing production on trial lines since August 2005 and will quickly ramp it up in the end of this year at 3,000 units per month, in order to begin a commercial launch of high-end 50+ inch sets in Japan before the end of March 2006. Previsions are 15,000 units/month thereafter in January 2007 thanks to a second dedicated plant, and 70,000/month later the same year.
  • Reply 18 of 44
    kidredkidred Posts: 2,402member
    Can you buy an SED tv right now today? Then that's what I call vaporware. I can't recall how many manufacturers were doing LCoS only to pull or quit at the last minute due to various reasons.



    Until you can buy one, I'll withhold excitement.
  • Reply 19 of 44
    mellomello Posts: 555member
    Just read another article about Canon's SED tv.



    Link Here.



    Page two has some interesting demonstration photos comparing the SED to

    plasma & lcd screens.
  • Reply 20 of 44
    Quote:

    Originally posted by KidRed

    Can you buy an SED tv right now today? Then that's what I call vaporware. I can't recall how many manufacturers were doing LCoS only to pull or quit at the last minute due to various reasons.



    Until you can buy one, I'll withhold excitement.




    By your definition then the Yonah processor and PS 3 (CELL) are both vaporware as well. I think that your definition is too broad. It may happen that this technology never sees the light of day, like e-ink technologies to date have. This could be for many reasons, but as long as no specific products have been anounced using them then I wouldnt call them vaporware.



    I think that the biggest hurdle to all of the display technologies is competing with the ever decreasing price and increasing size of conventional LCD screen technology which seems to be outpacing the other technologies on the market.
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