Picasa is so much better than iPhoto

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  • Reply 81 of 150
    Guys can someone tell me where can I download from this Picasa 2 or Picasa for Mac OS X?



    On the Google site only the PC version is available, and it sais that the Mac one isn't available yet.



    10q
  • Reply 82 of 150
    mikefmikef Posts: 697member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Artanis

    Guys can someone tell me where can I download from this icasa 2 or Picasa for Mac OS X?



    It does not exist, that's the whole point of this thread.
  • Reply 83 of 150
    Quote:

    Originally posted by mikef

    It does not exist, that's the whole point of this thread.



    ok, sorry.
  • Reply 84 of 150
    pyr3pyr3 Posts: 946member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Project2501

    Second thing is securing, if there is something I don't want to share with world it's in my FileVault protected home directory. Idea for password protected folders is sort of backwards thinking, you shouldn't be securing things that you don't want to share but sharing only the things you want. This is some thing Apple needs to sort out in future, how to wisely share things with others based on some simple rules, like share these pictures based on this rule to all users on this computer/all computers in LAN and so on. Apple hasn't yet figured out all the possibilities of metadata ideology, but at least they are one giant step ahead of Windows on this.



    The problem is in securing everything. FileVault kinda sucks, IMHO. Why? Because when I'm low on hard drive space and I delete a bunch of files from my home directory, I have to reboot (or log out, I guess) to allow for FileVault to resize the sparse image so that I can take advantage of the space I just freed up. While I'm not blaming Apple for this, because it is something that is inherent in the technology, we need technologies that allow us to seemlessly protect folders.



    Also I think that it's kinda stupid that if I want to 'share' photos in iPhoto with someone. under your reasoning, I would have to create a new user account for them an copy the photos over in your scenario rather than just opening up iPhoto under my user account and showing them. By being able to 'lock' certain photos in iPhoto, you can prevent accidental viewing of photos that you want to remain private.



    By your reasoning, I should put EVERYTHING in my house into one large vault. And then only take out the stuff that I want to share with others when I need to share it with them. And I shouldn't use a bank for my money either. Just one large vault for everything I own. That's overkill to me.



    I don't think people should be required to run around encrypting individual files using GnuPG or PGP with a command-line interface or anything. It's possible to use encryption in a user-friendly manner. It's just that most people creating encryption software don't know UI design principles that well.
  • Reply 85 of 150
    pyr3pyr3 Posts: 946member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Kickaha

    Agreed, but if you're *only* doing an en masse back up, you *DON'T* care where files are stored, do you? When you're backing up your mail, for example, you don't care about which mail message is stored where, you just want all your mail backed up. I don't see a Backup feature *inside* Mail, nor would I expect to.



    Well, I don't know about a backup feature within Mail.app, but there are a lot of people that would think that going into their ~/Library/ folder to backup their email is too hard.



    Quote:

    I think this way leads to the Kitchen Sink Mentality... and Windows UI design.



    So, by Apple putting that inside iPhoto, EVERY iApp / Apple App will be like that? And all developers everywhere will turn their heads and follow Apple's lead? I hardly think so. My thinking is that Photo organization apps could be the exception to the rule, not the base-standard.



    [quote][b]This is what I meant by lack of solid definitions for what people meant by backing up... to me, and to most people, backing up is a mirroring of the current state of *everything*.



    Quote:



    What I hear most people saying is "I want to move certain pictures aside for a while, but pull them back in later with preserved metadata". The term most often used for that is Archiving.




    I'm not talking about archiving. Everything that I was originally talking about was not relating to removal of the photos from the iPhoto library at all. More like incremental backup. You can backup all your stuff now, and iPhoto keeps track of what was backed up. Then when you want to backup again, it will only backup what has changed since the last back up (I was originally just thinking about 'new photos,' but this discussion has forced me to think beyond that; I realized that previously backed up photos might still be editted in the future.)



    Quote:



    Again, clashing terminology. There's no reason to have a Backup feature in iPhoto, one in iTunes, one in iMovie, one in iDVD... when you can have a dedicated tool that only needs to know only a little bit about the file structure of each app. Think plugins into a backup tool.




    I think that the plugins to a backup tool is a good idea. Something that can specifically access the libraries of iPhoto, iTunes, etc. Possibly have some way of defining a 'default backup tool' in OS X and then having a 'Backup' button in iPhoto that launches it or something? But that's beside the point.



    I haven't used iMovie, or iDVD, but I was under the impression that they weren't managers of movie/dvd libraries. So those would be about as relevent as the MS Word example.



    Quote:



    Archiving is another issue, and one that I agree needs to be addressed, and *has* to be done from within iPhoto.




    Archiving could be done with an external backup tool. It would just need a plugin allowing it to use the iPhoto library. But that only solves the 'putting it to disk and removing it' issue. There's also the issue of how iPhoto should handle the missing files? What if some of those files were in albums that still exist and have unarchived flies in them? Should the albums still be viewable in iPhoto, but with a message that says you need to 'Insert Archive Disc 2?'



    Quote:

    Ah, see, that's archiving. And it *is* a useful feature.



    I wasn't talking about archiving at that point. Archiving assumes that the files are being 'moved' off disk/offsite/etc. I was just talking about burning them to disc.



    Quote:

    Er, if you're not concerned about metadata, here's an iPhoto route to the same thing, more or less:



    Select pictures.

    Export pictures to disc.

    Tag pictures as exported.



    Not as smooth, definitely, but I think it provides the backbone for the same functionality. Perhaps a quick Applescript over the top?





    Perhaps a better interface for this in iPhoto. Like a 'tag as exported' check box in preferences or a pop-up when you export. Does export allow you to export directly to CD/DVD? That might be useful.



    One comment also is that the 'snapshots'/backups could be stored in a way that would allow them to be used for other programs. (i.e. store them so that you don't have to sort through massive amounts of edits, duplicates, etc if you want to use the backup to put them onto a PC, or another photo library on the Mac.) Because what if you decide to use that backup sometime in the future when you no longer have iPhoto or OS X? Lessening the burden on the user would be nice. I wouldn't expect Apple to do this, but another backup program could.
  • Reply 86 of 150
    I don't think Picasa is better than iPhoto. iPhoto is better than Picasa.



    Number 1, Picasa has nothing like iPhoto's integration with OS X and iLife (and increasingly third party apps). I love being able to add a photo to my iPhoto library right from within an email window in OS X Mail (or right click on a photo in Safari and save it to iPhoto). Or choosing an iPhoto library to use as my desktop background from System Preferences. Or having iTunes load some of my photo albums into my new 60 gig iPod. Or having my iPhotos available in iMovie and iDVD. Third party developers -- For example, iSale ebay listing software - you can upload photos from iPhoto to ebay real easy.



    Number 2, I love the book feature in iPhoto and use that all the time. I didn't see anything like that built into Picasa. Love the print ordering with iPhoto - no need to go to another website (that's slower)



    Number 3, I like the storage system in iPhoto. The lack of multiple libraries is a minor thing for most people. Sure, if you need it maybe you hate iPhoto for that reason but that doesn't make Picasa a better program overall. Frankly, I think the way Picasa grabs photos from all over your drive is a bad idea because what happens if some folder gets deleted. Better to have the photos in a central place (and where they can't get mucked with). Also, backing up your iPhotos is a no brainer with Backup (.Mac). Everything's automated.



    Number 4, support. I don't see any live person phone support for Picasa. When I buy a new mac, I get Applecare and can call them anytime for three years and get any issue with iPhoto resolved. Even without applecare, you can go to any apple retail store and get free help. I hate email only support - it's often useless and annoying.



    Number 5, the way you can make the thumbnails bigger and smaller in iPhoto is really slick. Picasa can't seem to do that as smoothly and elegantly (I think that's more of a Windows issue, but still).
  • Reply 87 of 150
    So you're pretty much ready to pay $400+ just to be able to organize and backup your pictures?



    Hmm. Interesting.
  • Reply 88 of 150
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Gene Clean

    So you're pretty much ready to pay $400+ just to be able to organize and backup your pictures?



    Hmm. Interesting.




    Where does the $400 come from? If it's .Mac, Applecare, iLife, you seem to be forgetting that you get more than "organizing and backing up your pictures" for the cost of those products.



    Anyways, I thought this thread was about what's better, not what's cheaper. Granted, a $299 Dell desktop with a downloaded copy of Picasa is cheaper than a Mac with Applecare support and .Mac. But I know which I'm buying.



    Oh, I forgot another reason why iPhoto is better than Picasa - Rendevous sharing of photo libraries among user accounts on the same mac and macs on your home network. This is really slick and you can even copy photos from shared libraries (unlike with iTunes).
  • Reply 89 of 150
    maccrazymaccrazy Posts: 2,658member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by curmi

    Given spotlight, iPhoto could (potentially) be able to find all your images on your hard drive, and they just appear in iphoto almost instantly. So I would think an iPhoto for Tiger could work even better in this way.



    It sounds like Picasa works better when used with a file system. Given that there is a trend away from that from Apple (and Microsoft) to this spotlight type thing, what does that mean?




    I don't want all my images in iPhoto - just my photographs. Anyway I will be switching ti Aperture soon. yay!
  • Reply 90 of 150
    Quote:

    Originally posted by mikef

    It does not exist, that's the whole point of this thread.



  • Reply 91 of 150
    maccrazymaccrazy Posts: 2,658member
    excellent - nice to see people reading the first few posts in a thread



  • Reply 92 of 150
    Quote:

    Originally posted by cesjr

    ...

    Number 3, I like the storage system in iPhoto. The lack of multiple libraries is a minor thing for most people. Sure, if you need it maybe you hate iPhoto for that reason but that doesn't make Picasa a better program overall. Frankly, I think the way Picasa grabs photos from all over your drive is a bad idea because what happens if some folder gets deleted. Better to have the photos in a central place (and where they can't get mucked with). Also, backing up your iPhotos is a no brainer with Backup (.Mac). Everything's automated.

    ...




    First, i like your post, i fully agree with almost everything. Also,

    backing up your iPhotos is a no brainer even with the Finder.

    Drag the library onto another disk, burn it, done. What is wrong

    with that?





    Quote:

    ...

    Number 5, the way you can make the thumbnails bigger and smaller in iPhoto is really slick. Picasa can't seem to do that as smoothly and elegantly (I think that's more of a Windows issue, but still).




    This feature alone is priceless, imho
  • Reply 93 of 150
    I have nothing constructive to add to the debate re: iPhoto vs. Picasa.



    However, I will say that I absolutely detest iPhoto as an application. I've never been very satisfied with it minus some of its organizational features. Having said that, it's slow (1ghz Powerbook), buggy, and did I mention slow? Doing anything in iPhoto is a painful and often counter-intuitive process; it certainly is the sore thumb in the collection of excellent iApps.



    A backup option would be quite nice considering one pays for iPhoto whereas Picasa is free.
  • Reply 94 of 150
    Quote:

    Originally posted by pyr3



    Also I think that it's kinda stupid that if I want to 'share' photos in iPhoto with someone. under your reasoning, I would have to create a new user account for them an copy the photos over in your scenario rather than just opening up iPhoto under my user account and showing them. By being able to 'lock' certain photos in iPhoto, you can prevent accidental viewing of photos that you want to remain private.




    If it's you whos showing the fotos, why the hell do show pictures you don't want people to see????? Point was give your mother own acount and give her ability to see some pictures you choose.



    Quote:

    By your reasoning, I should put EVERYTHING in my house into one large vault. And then only take out the stuff that I want to share with others when I need to share it with them. And I shouldn't use a bank for my money either. Just one large vault for everything I own. That's overkill to me.



    That vault is called your house, why leave doors open, when you can lock them. And give keys only to those peole you trust.



    Quote:

    I don't think people should be required to run around encrypting individual files using GnuPG or PGP with a command-line interface or anything. It's possible to use encryption in a user-friendly manner. It's just that most people creating encryption software don't know UI design principles that well.



    Thats why we have FileVault.
  • Reply 95 of 150
    maccrazymaccrazy Posts: 2,658member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Project2501

    Thats why we have FileVault.



    I still wouldn't recommend using this.
  • Reply 96 of 150
    Quote:

    Originally posted by cesjr

    Where does the $400 come from?



    $99 for .Mac (for backup) and around $300 for AppleCare for 3 years that you mentioned when you talked about support.



    That's $400 dollars right there. Might as well get Aperture.
  • Reply 97 of 150
    maccrazymaccrazy Posts: 2,658member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Gene Clean

    $99 for .Mac (for backup) and around $300 for AppleCare for 3 years that you mentioned when you talked about support.



    That's $400 dollars right there. Might as well get Aperture.




    Aperture doesn't give you the warranty. Incidentally AppleCare varies depending on the computer you have. Desktops being cheaper than laptops.
  • Reply 98 of 150
    Quote:

    Originally posted by MacCrazy

    Aperture doesn't give you the warranty. Incidentally AppleCare varies depending on the computer you have. Desktops being cheaper than laptops.



    And your point? It's not $400, but it's $350. So?



    When you compare applications, it is necessary to compare them on equal grounds. Extras that will run you $400 give an advantage to app A, therefore making the comparison pointless.
  • Reply 99 of 150
    gongon Posts: 2,437member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by cesjr

    Number 3, I like the storage system in iPhoto. The lack of multiple libraries is a minor thing for most people. Sure, if you need it maybe you hate iPhoto for that reason but that doesn't make Picasa a better program overall. Frankly, I think the way Picasa grabs photos from all over your drive is a bad idea because what happens if some folder gets deleted.



    What happens is I restore from backup. You know, the thing iPhoto doesn't let me do?



    Does your word processor have a library too? What's keeping you from deleting all your documents?
    Quote:

    Number 4, support. I don't see any live person phone support for Picasa. When I buy a new mac, I get Applecare and can call them anytime for three years and get any issue with iPhoto resolved. Even without applecare, you can go to any apple retail store and get free help. I hate email only support - it's often useless and annoying.



    I have good experiences of Applecare in general, but they can't fix broken software.



    edit: to clarify, I think they work reasonably hard to help, and are willing to look into things, but with how simple it is to use Macs, when I have a problem it's too hard for them too. I have contacted them three times. Once for iPhoto (restoring from backup was impossible), once for OS X keyboard shortcuts (broken in 10.3, "fixed" by removing the feature in 10.4) and once because I can't get my native characters to work right in Terminal. Not once did I get the problem fixed.
  • Reply 100 of 150
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Gon

    What happens is I restore from backup. You know, the thing iPhoto doesn't let me do?



    Does your word processor have a library too? What's keeping you from deleting all your documents?I have good experiences of Applecare in general, but they can't fix broken software.



    edit: to clarify, I think they work reasonably hard to help, and are willing to look into things, but with how simple it is to use Macs, when I have a problem it's too hard for them too. I have contacted them three times. Once for iPhoto (restoring from backup was impossible), once for OS X keyboard shortcuts (broken in 10.3, "fixed" by removing the feature in 10.4) and once because I can't get my native characters to work right in Terminal. Not once did I get the problem fixed.




    Lack of one feature some people want (restore from backup) does not a better program Picassa make. (Especially when apple in fact offers this, you just have to pay for that - in .mac)
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