I'm switching to Linux/Windows

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  • Reply 21 of 157
    relicrelic Posts: 4,735member
    Hey Placebo I don\\'t blame you one bit. The only thing that keeps me from dumping Apple completely is the OS. I just recently finished my computer buying spree for the year and unfortunately it didn\\'t include a Mac. I\\'m waiting for the whole PowerPC -> Intel thing to mature a little before investing any more money. After my brother takes my PowerMac off my hands for school I\\'ll just have the 12inch brick Powerbook, which pretty much just got replaced with a much lighter, faster Dual Core IBM X61. I use Ubuntu for my Linux distribution, I do have a partition with Windows in my desktop machine but it\\'s only used for gaming. You\\'ve been around here a long time so don\\'t take crap from the \\"Ok, then bye now\\" crowd. You\\'ve been a great addition to this silly forum and we appreciate it. Good luck with your new toy.



    Sorry for the \\"\\\\\\"\\'s I\\'m posting this from a Proxy site that seems to have a bad PHP programmer. Ever heard of stripslashes() dude!
  • Reply 22 of 157
    placeboplacebo Posts: 5,767member
    I really, really, really like Mac OS X and everything about it, from Spotlight to Expose. However, I have faith that I can either get myself used to Linux, or configure Linux in a manner that will replace some of the functionality. THere is a Linux Expose utility that I think I'll be installing.
  • Reply 23 of 157
    Hey there,



    I have been around these forums for a year or so and just this week finally made the switch the other way around (AMD athlon 1400 / winXP -> iMac 20" core duo). The reason for my move is the ease and peace of the Mac after years of tinkering with my pc and becoming ever more frustrated at having to defragment, clean registry, fight with driver-issues, update spyware-removal, antivirus, firewall, re-installing windows and not forgetting: annoying noise from cheap PC-fans.

    For me, getting rid of all that is well worth the Apple-tax. And i get some pretty neat free software as well (and no, there is no equal to the integrated iLife-suite on windows, only some non-integrated apps such as picasa).

    Nevertheless I very much understand you're move as well, I guess it's all about priorities. If you're into hardware and gaming (I'm not) than a PC is a way better option and way more affordable hardware-wise.



    So best of luck to you and come around sometimes!
  • Reply 24 of 157
    Quote:

    Originally posted by a_greer

    Still too rich for my blood -- The Mac platform is a country club, and I am a bus-boy



    If I win the lotto, I will get a proper Mac, but I sort of agree, the Apple hardware sux.



    Could you imagine OSX on a dual dual core amd 4200+, with 2 Quadras in SLI, THAT would be a workstation...not this "core duo" shit




    Price that rig out for us and post back here, will ya?
  • Reply 25 of 157
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Placebo

    THere is a Linux Expose utility that I think I'll be installing.



    Just watch this and you'll see that Expose is not limited to OS X. Or good graphics, or Spotlight, or whatever.



    If I had Photoshop, I'd use Linux full-time. I have GIMP, and it's good, but I need Photoshop.



    Let us know when you get your hardware. We can help you with choosing a good distro and related things.



    Edit: And one more thing, you might want to research Linux compatibility with some of the more exotic hardware you might be getting. I don't mean processor and things like that, but maybe some type of soundcard or if you get a laptop, the WiFi card (Intel ones are the best). And, I cannot emphasize this enough: screw ATi. They have piss-poor drivers for Linux. When it comes to graphics cards, nVidia is the way to go.
  • Reply 26 of 157
    No one needs to convince you. Here's what's going to happen: you're going to try to get Linux to do what you want to do, fail, and then just give up and install windows. Then you'll end up being disappointed because Windows isn't good for anything other than playing video games that have been on the consoles for over a year. I'm serious here. Vista may fix things, but XP is just a shit-show when compared to what else is out there.



    I highly recommend that you try Suse Linux. Of all of them, it's probably the distribution that's easiest to install. But it's still hard to do without a decent knowledge of C programming, Unix shells, and the like. Mac OS X is a much easier environment to learn these things than is Linux.
  • Reply 27 of 157
    rokrok Posts: 3,519member
    i work around so many people who use windows and go out of their way to a.) insult me for the computer i use (they call it teasing) and b.) ask me why it's better, like i'm supposed to lead these horses to water AND make them drink.



    and then at LEAST once a month, someone's machine goes down and needs to be reinstalled. or norton antivirus goes haywire and takes the internet connection out with it, or the dell server goes down and needs to be brought back up from tape backup. part of it is my IT dept.'s utter incompetence, but i just sit down at my mac and get cool shit done all the time and stuff works, and it usually doesn't stop working, and if it does, i can usually fix it myself, without having to crack open terminal. (but god help me if i have to ask for help once every 4-6 months or so... then they're like "if you were on windows, this wouldn't have happened.")



    someone once said the mac os is an operating system that just gets the hell out of your way and lets you get stuff done. i agree. and i get to do way cooler stuff, too, often for way cheaper. people friggin' drop their jaws when they ask me for the impossible kiosk movie in a week, and i crack open my copy of keynote and have it churned out, with hardly any training, in time and well under budget. sure, some things like adobe apps are the same button-for-button across platform, but i tell you, right now, that's not such a great thing.



    i enjoy my computer and what i can do with it. and i have a lot of free time because what i need to do gets done faster and more reliably than anyone i've ever known doing the same thing i am doing, but on a windows machine. if people can't learn by my example, then too bad for them.
  • Reply 28 of 157
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Splinemodel

    I highly recommend that you try Suse Linux. Of all of them, it's probably the distribution that's easiest to install. But it's still hard to do without a decent knowledge of C programming, Unix shells, and the like.



    Please stop talking nonsense. Installing SuSE requires knowledge of C programming?! Since when does popping a DVD in the drive and clicking OK need Unix shells?



    Installing SuSE has got to be the easiest installation of an OS ever. You just click OK damn it. How much easier does it have to get? Read your mind?



    Here's a shot by shot installation of SuSE. Now be a good sport and tell us where do you see the requirement for Unix shells and C programming there.
  • Reply 29 of 157
    trumptmantrumptman Posts: 16,455member
    Well I don't need to do anything to try to bring you back, I'm sure the user experience and the cost of all those ridiculous gaming upgrades will change your mind over time.



    I have nothing against PC's. I have three of them in my house and all of them were home-built. My son does his computing on my Abit BH6 which had a Celeron [email protected] once upon a time. Now it has a Celeron [email protected]



    I finally gave up the ghost on the whole PC gaming thing with an AMD XP2400 and 1 gig RAM along with Nvidia 5700. As you can tell this was a while ago because such hardware is already "dated." This stuff is obsolete before you take it out of the box. When I watched Quake go from hardware to software, that helped my justify the costs of the then ridiculous Voodoo 1 and later associated cards. However I have never experienced a game that justified the insane costs of most of the current hardware.



    I got very tired of gaining nothing game experience-wise while the hardware demands, and their associated costs continued to climb. Also the console experience simply became more enjoyable. There aren't the continual upgrade costs and sitting on the sofa with the kids was more fun.



    Also I really feel Apple has it right with regard to the direction I want to go and how much space, upkeep, etc. I desire to put into my computing experience. I have a G4 tower now and assure you it will be the last tower of any nature I ever own. Laptops, iMacs or even minis are the future of computing that I envision and want in my home. I don't want big, empty fan-laden towers no matter WHO makes them.



    People look at the costs of LCD's versus CRT's and even though there are trade offs for most people it is no comparison. They want the LCD. Even with the trade-offs, it represents something better in terms of what we will enjoy.



    Macs are this way for me now. Sure I could have a fire-breathing PC tower. I could even have a fire-breathing Mac tower. I don't want either. I want a nice 15 inch laptop computer with dual-cores that can be enjoyed in more than one room of the house or even travel with me.



    If I want to game, I'll find a way to enjoy the trade-offs of my kids and I on the sofa with the gamecube, versus high resolution textures. I enjoy that multiplayer experience much more than anything I did gaming online in a room with a big box.



    But to each his own...

    Nick
  • Reply 30 of 157
    placeboplacebo Posts: 5,767member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Gene Clean

    Just watch this and you'll see that Expose is not limited to OS X. Or good graphics, or Spotlight, or whatever.



    If I had Photoshop, I'd use Linux full-time. I have GIMP, and it's good, but I need Photoshop.



    Let us know when you get your hardware. We can help you with choosing a good distro and related things.



    Edit: And one more thing, you might want to research Linux compatibility with some of the more exotic hardware you might be getting. I don't mean processor and things like that, but maybe some type of soundcard or if you get a laptop, the WiFi card (Intel ones are the best). And, I cannot emphasize this enough: screw ATi. They have piss-poor drivers for Linux. When it comes to graphics cards, nVidia is the way to go.




    Yeah, is what you posted what used to be called Project Looking Glass? Or is what you posted something different? Looks neat either way.



    The lack of Photoshop is a setback, I don't use it much anyways, but I won't be able to use Macromedia apps either.



    I'm going with Nvidia for graphics just because I like them and their cards are nice. As for compatibility, all of that is compatible I'm pretty sure, although I haven't checked the WiFi adapter.
  • Reply 31 of 157
    zengazenga Posts: 267member
    I've been a windows user for over 15 years, before that DOS user most of us were, right? anyways after many years of using windows like many of us simply got so frustrated that i wanted to throw acid @ my PC & throw it from the highest place I could find.. With the return of S.Jobs to Apple & the new G3 I just couldn't resist & after that the iMac was simply imposible not to try, with Mac OS 8 @ that time and after with Mac OS 9 installed on my PowerBook G4 500Mhz I was simply happy & relieved of not using windows all the time.. For one reason or another I ended up selling my G3, giving away my iMac to my brother & then the PowerBook to another, just because I was going to buy me "of course" a new mac.. But for some reason "work" "family" who knows I had to hold that buy for more than 3 years.. Going back to windows "full time" reminded me why I had switch to Mac for good & when I left the Macworld, Mac OS X had just come out & I was impressed by the beauty of it, although I saw that it needed much improvement I could see & feel the potential...



    So Few years later I come back with a vengance, iMac G5 20" with Tiger.. I can only say: *** I LOVE MY MAC *** .. lol .. In fact I'm just waiting fto see if they come out with the 13.3" MacBooks (iBooks) or the PRO version.. but that's not all.. what i've done in barely 3 months with my iMac I just can't remember ever doing it on any of the PC I've owned.



    Mac OS has everything, It doesn't bother me, I get my work done & enjoy using it @ the same time, what else can I say..?



    MAC OS X "ROCKS"



    P.S. Anybody switching for Mac OS to [email protected]$%^ please send me your MAC, lol.
  • Reply 32 of 157
    placeboplacebo Posts: 5,767member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Zenga



    P.S. Anybody switching for Mac OS to [email protected]$%^ please send me your MAC, lol.




    Sure, I'll include a display and some software.





    For $1500.
  • Reply 33 of 157
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Gene Clean

    Please stop talking nonsense. Installing SuSE requires knowledge of C programming?! Since when does popping a DVD in the drive and clicking OK need Unix shells?



    Installing SuSE has got to be the easiest installation of an OS ever. You just click OK damn it. How much easier does it have to get? Read your mind?



    Here's a shot by shot installation of SuSE. Now be a good sport and tell us where do you see the requirement for Unix shells and C programming there.




    It's foolish to assume that everything you'll want to do in Linux will be available from something as pleasant as YAST. Beyond that, I've installed Linux on quite a few machines, and NEVER has there been a time where it was incident free. I'm also going to pan GNU in general for cultivating a ridiculous policy in nomenclature. Sometimes, it's easy to find what you want. Other times, it's a fuckng nightmare, since the names of gnu apps are often extremely cryptic and truncated. I'll gladly type in four more characters when I want to run the damn thing if it helps me remember what it does.



    Moving on, you'll undoubtedly need to create shell scripts, config scripts, and plenty of other scripts. You will probably also need to compile some tools, hence the knowledge of C. If you aren't using these tools, I question your motive for going with Linux.
  • Reply 34 of 157
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Splinemodel

    [B]It's foolish to assume that everything you'll want to do in Linux will be available from something as pleasant as YAST.



    There are other pleasant tools. APT, Synaptic, Autopackage, etc. Find typing



    Quote:

    apt-get install app-name



    hard? Then use Synaptic, a GUI front-end to APT where you just double click on something and it installs.



    Quote:

    Beyond that, I've installed Linux on quite a few machines, and NEVER has there been a time where it was incident free.



    That also depends on the machines. That's why you need to do some research before you buy hardware to run Linux on.



    Quote:

    I'm also going to pan GNU in general for cultivating a ridiculous policy in nomenclature. Sometimes, it's easy to find what you want. Other times, it's a fuckng nightmare, since the names of gnu apps are often extremely cryptic and truncated.



    GNU applications are far and few, the most important applications are quite user-friendly; even their names. F-spot for photos, Firefox for web, OpenOffice for an office suite, Gnome Terminal for a Terminal, you get the idea.



    Quote:

    I'll gladly type in four more characters when I want to run the damn thing if it helps me remember what it does.



    You don't have to type anything, just click on its icon. Remember the icon and use it as a tool to identify the application. Kinda like Safari... the name has nothing to do with browsing webpages, but people know the icon so it's a done deal.



    Quote:

    Moving on, you'll undoubtedly need to create shell scripts, config scripts, and plenty of other scripts.



    I beg to differ. Show me some examples.



    Quote:

    You will probably also need to compile some tools, hence the knowledge of C.



    No, knowledge of C is not required at all. Compiling something, when its not available as a binary package, is as easy as typing



    Quote:

    ./configure

    make

    make install



    and as long as you have the dependencies, you are all set. No C required at all.



    Quote:

    If you aren't using these tools, I question your motive for going with Linux.



    Stability, speed, a wider array of supported hardware, free software, freedom to modify and adapt the software any way you wish and need.



    These are good enough reasons to consider and use Linux.
  • Reply 35 of 157
    Placebo,



    Can I have your old G5?



    Seriously, though... PC gaming is more or less dead, consoles are on the rise...



    What are you going to do?
  • Reply 36 of 157
    hirohiro Posts: 2,663member
    You've been bitching for years. The only reason I can see for announcing this is to get more attention. Well you got it. Now don't let the door hit you on the way out.



    Bye!
  • Reply 37 of 157
    elixirelixir Posts: 782member
    what a dumb thread.







    the 360 is sweet



    then you have a new nintendo and whatever that will bring





    and on top of it all the ps3 is set to astonish everyone or fall flat on its face.







    who cares about pc gaming?
  • Reply 38 of 157
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Gene Clean



    Stability, speed, a wider array of supported hardware, free software, freedom to modify and adapt the software any way you wish and need.



    These are good enough reasons to consider and use Linux.




    Um, if you want to adapt and modify software you need to have some knowledge of the things I brought up. In addition, all of the things you brought up, tit-for-tat, further prove my point: one way or another, there's a lot of research you have to do in order to get GNU/Linux to do what you want.



    Lastly, it's obvious you're a Linux dedicate. I also think Linux is great, but you've been drinking too much kool-aid to honestly believe that it's a less or equally demanding process to get a desktop Linux distro all together than it is to do the same for a commercial desktop OS. Granted, with Windows you don't have much say in the matter, Windows drivers tend to be more mature and the chances that you're going to be scurrying around in xserver's init and config files are nil. (Yes, I know you can't access these files).



    My message isn't a negative one, it's just one of caution. If you're installing GNU/Linux into your desktop, be prepared for some trench warfare.
  • Reply 39 of 157
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Splinemodel

    [B]Um, if you want to adapt and modify software you need to have some knowledge of the things I brought up. In addition, all of the things you brought up, tit-for-tat, further prove my point: one way or another, there's a lot of research you have to do in order to get GNU/Linux to do what you want.



    Even so, that's only if you want to change the software. There are other, more immediate positive things about trying Linux, like its stability, speed and wealth of free software. You seem to have ignored those.





    Quote:

    Lastly, it's obvious you're a Linux dedicate.



    No, it's just obvious you've no idea what you're talking about.





    Quote:

    I also think Linux is great, but you've been drinking too much kool-aid to honestly believe that it's a less or equally demanding process to get a desktop Linux distro all together than it is to do the same for a commercial desktop OS.



    There are commercial Linux distro's that are on par with, or even surpass other commercial desktops OSs. I think you've been drinking too much commercial desktop OS kool-aid to be aware of these things.





    Quote:

    Granted, with Windows you don't have much say in the matter, Windows drivers tend to be more mature and the chances that you're going to be scurrying around in xserver's init and config files are nil. (Yes, I know you can't access these files).



    Xserver drivers are both released either by nVidia or ATi. That says nothing about Linux, except that nVidia and ATi have crappy drivers if they make you 'scurr' around in Xorg config files.



    Quote:

    My message isn't a negative one, it's just one of caution. If you're installing GNU/Linux into your desktop, be prepared for some trench warfare.



    Uh-huh.
  • Reply 40 of 157
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Gene Clean



    No, it's just obvious you've no idea what you're talking about.




    I wasn't going to respond to you anymore, since there didn't seem to be a point, but now you're just being a jerk and I feel like I have to defend myself against your jerkdom.



    Of course you can believe whatever you want, but the truth is that one of the things I do is develop Linux based embedded hardware, and I do it on Linux based desktops. So imagine how foolish you sound to me. I get the feeling that you're just another kid who thinks he knows something because he uses Linux on his desktop. This is how you sound: "Linux is the best thing ever. Everyone should use for everything because it's easier to setup, use, and the apps are free, not to mention extensible and configurable."



    Clearly, if this were unequivocally true, more people would use Linux on the desktop. Guess what. . . that's not the case, and it's not because of Microsoft's evil empire.
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