Nike and Apple launch Nike+iPod product line

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Comments

  • Reply 61 of 94
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,507member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by mike12309

    what the hell is the last thing Nike innovated? Sorry that sneaker with a fancy new swish is still just a sneaker. Oh and putting more padding on it or "pumps" [stupidest thing ever] doesnt count as innovation.



    With that said, i do think the wireless dealy is an awesome idea-- i always go out of my way to go to a track so that i can monitor my distance accurately... this will eliminate that need i suppose. Kudos.




    Innovation is a good thing, but Nike is the biggest, most popular, and best known brand, and when you are co marketing, that's what matters.



    Nike wouldn't have been interested in doing this witth Creative, and Apple wouldn't have been interested in doing it with Adidas, though they are MY favorite brand.
  • Reply 62 of 94
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,507member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by DeaPeaJay

    Hey, I'm just giving my opinion on what seems logical to me. Whether I'm right or left makes no difference.



    I don't trust Moore. Period. That's my opinion take it or leave it. Gosh!




    While you are right about Nike, almost all clothing companies have most of their product made somewhere, in a sweat shop. If you can find at least one major brand in any category, and you like their product, then you can buy it. The problem is that until someone finds a factory, and reports on it, you might think that a particular company is free of that, when they aren't.



    The other problem is that these people, and even children, need jobs. I find it distasteful to comment too severely on other countries economies, when most all the people are very poor, and these companies are providing needed work. Most countries aren't industrialized yet. This is going to happen. The conditions in these factories tend to be at least as good at other natively owned factories in those countries, and are often better.



    As far as Moore goes, he has a view. Perhaps it's a bit extreme, but it's no more so that those on the other side of the issue.
  • Reply 63 of 94
    macgregormacgregor Posts: 1,434member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by wilco

    Now I get it. Since Rush Limbaugh didn't talk about, it doesn't exist.







    As for Moore, I'm pretty liberal, but I don't agree with the theatrics of some of his documentaries. Fact by fact though, he is usually accurate, whether you like him or not or his techniques.



    Growing up in Beaverton Oregon, I've seen Nike become big time from little local shoe guys selling in high school parking lots. I don't trust any big corporation that gets that successful, even Apple, but they are more of a lightning rod then others who do the same thing. For many countries, some will have to go thru the same growing pains of industrialization that the US did before the middle class and labor laws changed things. Unfortunately most don't have the resources of a conquered continent to do so ... as well. Global corporatization of small countries needs more than unrestrained free marketeering to really be good for developing countries. They need to work for themselves, not for us.



    That said, this is intriguing, but I doubt I would buy it.
  • Reply 64 of 94
    aegisdesignaegisdesign Posts: 2,914member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by frankie

    Nike is a terrible company that is known for paying nothing to it's employees in sweatshops all over the world. Watch the Michael Moore flick 'The Big One' and listen to how much of an idiot Philip Knight is. I personally will never buy a Nike product, even though my love for Apple runs very deep.





    But which sportswear company would you buy a product from?



    They almost all use the same factories and suppliers in China, Thailand, Burma and Indonesia such as the massive Yue Yuen company with over 250,000 workers.



    Michael Moore picked on the biggest company because they're an easy target and to some extent he was right as Nike have pulled the industry that way. Because the big three companies (Nike, Adidas and Reebok) use cheap labour, the rest of the companies have to in order to compete. If he was going to be totally fair though, he'd pick on the entire sportswear industry for continuing to let their sub-contractors get away with substandard working practices.



    Apple have just gone with the market leaders. The ones that have Nike stores throughout the world. Their decision has nothing to do with ethics.
  • Reply 65 of 94
    gene cleangene clean Posts: 3,481member
    Quote:

    Their decision has nothing to do with ethics.



    That's why it's an extension of unethical behaviour by way of providing continuing streams of revenue for the morally bankrupt company known as Nike.
  • Reply 66 of 94
    aegisdesignaegisdesign Posts: 2,914member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Gene Clean

    That's why it's an extension of unethical behaviour by way of providing continuing streams of revenue for the morally bankrupt company known as Nike.



    All the big sports companies are morally bankrupt though. It's a morally bankrupt industry on the whole. Even Job's favourite New Balance uses the same factories as Nike.



    Even people like Converse, who are part of the RED campaign, use the same footwear manufacturers as Nike.



    You could argue they shouldn't have tied up with ANY of the sportswear manufacturers but if that's the case then they quite possibly shouldn't also be using many of the components in any of their computers either.
  • Reply 67 of 94
    aplnubaplnub Posts: 2,585member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by filburt

    Unless the battery lasts at least a year on typical use (2-3 hours a week), spending $29 to buy both the sensor and receiver everytime the battery is depleted is going to be expensive.



    Considering runners go through 4 - 6 sets of shoes (or more) per 12 month period that isn't an issue for them. $30 is a drop in the bucket.



    That's why I bike.
  • Reply 68 of 94
    chuckerchucker Posts: 5,089member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Gene Clean

    That's why it's an extension of unethical behaviour by way of providing continuing streams of revenue for the morally bankrupt company known as Nike.



    So, tell me, what have you been doing lately to work against moral bankruptcy? Not that I disagree with the criticism, but most people that employ these arguments don't really help their alleged causes much either.
  • Reply 69 of 94
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,946member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by DeaPeaJay

    I know nothing about Nike's business practices, but I suggest you take whatever Moore says with a grain of salt



    I believe that Nike's practices were fairly well known and documented before Moore said anything about it.
  • Reply 70 of 94
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,946member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by aegisdesign

    Even people like Converse, who are part of the RED campaign, use the same footwear manufacturers as Nike.





    Nike makes shoes in the US? My New Balance shoes happen to be marked as made in the USA. I didn't buy them for social concience or conciousness. I wasn't even aware of that when I bought them.
  • Reply 71 of 94
    a_greera_greer Posts: 4,594member
    When will Nike have a cell-phone in a dress-shoe...I wanna look down the road and see 50 yuppies impersonating Maxwell Smart
  • Reply 72 of 94
    aegisdesignaegisdesign Posts: 2,914member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by JeffDM

    Nike makes shoes in the US? My New Balance shoes happen to be marked as made in the USA. I didn't buy them for social concience or conciousness. I wasn't even aware of that when I bought them.



    New Balance have some production in the USA but much of their production is farmed out to far eastern contractors or "offshore" as it's quaintly known.



    Further than that, they also part produce some shoes abroad and finish them off in the USA before slapping on 'Made in the USA'. Many of it's factory employees in the USA are temporary workers and have little rights. More than Vietnamese workers perhaps but it's certainly not exactly a workers paradise.



    There's very few big companies which are pink and fluffy.
  • Reply 73 of 94
    irelandireland Posts: 17,568member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by mike12309

    what the hell is the last thing Nike innovated? Sorry that sneaker with a fancy new swish is still just a sneaker. Oh and putting more padding on it or "pumps" [stupidest thing ever] doesnt count as innovation.



    With that said, i do think the wireless dealy is an awesome idea-- i always go out of my way to go to a track so that i can monitor my distance accurately... this will eliminate that need i suppose. Kudos.




    Nike actually happens to make some of the best Golf clubs in the world, particularly when it comes to drivers. My brother in law is a pro. golfer and he swears by them.



    People have said that the battery in the sensor is not replaceable, but i've a funny feeling the sensor is charged by kinetic enery
  • Reply 74 of 94
    irelandireland Posts: 17,568member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by a_greer

    When will Nike have a cell-phone in a dress-shoe...I wanna look down the road and see 50 yuppies impersonating Maxwell Smart



    99
  • Reply 75 of 94
    shaun, ukshaun, uk Posts: 1,050member
    I bet the Nike shoes cost more than the Nano.
  • Reply 76 of 94
    Quote:

    Originally posted by rongold

    They already have [patented it]. Here is an excerpt from the patent (US Patent Office # 20050048955):



    Quote:

    A user of a communication device may initiate a communication, i.e., a telephone call, a text message, a page, an alert and the like, silently, via a macro-manipulation of the communication device and without having to identify a particularly button or sequence of buttons on the communication device. The communication device may include housing into which is disposed a sensor that detects the macro-manipulation of the communication device by the user. An output from the sensor is associated with a particular communication context, e.g., a particularly telephone number to which a call is to be completed, a communication device to which a text message is to be sent and the contents of the text message, an email address to which an email is to be sent, a pager to which either a page number, text or numeric message is to be sent, and the like. Responsive to the output from the sensor, the communication device initiates the communication according to the define context. Thus, a user of the communication device may initiate a communication in total darkness, without removing the communication device from a purse or pocket, and without having to identify a particular key or keys on the communication device.

    To avoid the possibility of inadvertently triggering the communication, such as by simply grasping the housing too firmly or by other circumstances that may cause the sensor to provide an output signal to the processor, a protocol for initiating the communication may be implemented. To initiate the communication the user is first required to twice quickly squeeze the housing of the communication unit shown by the pulses. This action, similar to the ?double click? action taken with a mouse input device on a computer, causes the communication unit to provide the response indicated on line, which is to provide a haptic response, such as a vibratory alert. The user, during the period of the haptic response, again squeezes the housing to generate a signal from the sensor. The communication unit responsive to the sensor input ends the haptic alert, and initiates the communication.

    As described, a communication unit, such as communication device, provides an ability to silently and covertly initiate a selected communication. A user may initiate a selected communication without having to identify, select or manipulate pushbuttons or other input devices on the communication unit, which are constantly shrinking in size. That is, the user may initiate the communication with a macro-manipulation of the communication device. Additionally, in an emergency situation, the user may summon help without revealing that such a request for help has been initiated, as the microphone of the communication device will be active and capture and transmit all audio activity taking place around the calling party.

    The communication need not be a telephone call to a predefined number. The communication may be a text message, a two-way communication alert, an email, a page or other such text, data, recorded message or recorded voice communication.





    Where on earth does that say anything along the lines of "we're going to cut holes in our shoes, and that's an original idea that no one should be able to copy."
  • Reply 77 of 94
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Shaun, UK

    I bet the Nike shoes cost more than the Nano.



    The black/red shoe featured on the apple site is $129

    It comes with the iPod Sport kit



    The cheapest nike+ shoe I could find is $85 (Air Max Moto+)

    This does not include the sport kit



    I will probably attempt to mod my New Balance shoes first before paying that kind of money.



    I would love to see a similar product for cyclists.

    Another great use for iPods would be to keep track of golf scores.
  • Reply 78 of 94
    irelandireland Posts: 17,568member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Johnny Mozzarella

    I would love to see a similar product for cyclists.

    Another great use for iPods would be to keep track of golf scores.














    I don't know how the cyclist thing would work, but when it comes to golf you wouldn't believe me if I told you how many times I thought about the iPod keeping track of golf scores. You do know that Nike loves golf don't you
  • Reply 79 of 94
    gordygordy Posts: 970member
    Is the information able to be extracted from the iPod, or does it just stay there like the stopwatch information?



    The data seems like it would be good to merge and place in a database, to analyze training at a team level. Not to mention a low-cost way of doing it, considering what is used now.
  • Reply 80 of 94
    Quote:

    Originally posted by gordy

    Is the information able to be extracted from the iPod, or does it just stay there like the stopwatch information?



    The data seems like it would be good to merge and place in a database, to analyze training at a team level. Not to mention a low-cost way of doing it, considering what is used now.




    you forgot to watch the addy www.nike.com/nikeplus



    Has anyone got the info or link to how the technology fro measuring distance actually works? Is it just a pediometer, or something more sophisticated?
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