Four Adobe InDesign CS3 features revealed

Posted:
in Mac Software edited January 2014
In a highly unorthodox moved by the traditionally tight-lipped company, Adobe Systems has followed up its official leak of details on Apollo with some gems on the next major release of InDesign.



In a private briefing with InDesignSecrets, the software company revealed four features planned for the next major release of the page layout application, which will ship in the second quarter of 2007 as part of Adobe Creative Suite 3.0.



The move comes just days after rival Quark announced a major overhaul to its own desktop publishing and page layout software, QuarkXPress 7.0. Although Quark called a last minute audible and released the software for Macs as a PowerPC native application instead of a Universal Binary, the company promised to release a patch that would deliver native Intel support by August.



Similarly, InDesign CS3 will also be a Universal Binary when it's released. The application is already up and running as a Universal Binary, Adobe revealed in demonstrations on a MacBook Pro.



One of the new features of the application, dubbed "Object Effects," will allow designers to apply Photoshop-like effects such as bevel, emboss and inner shadow, to any InDesign object including text. Meanwhile, another feature will allow transparency effects to be applied to an object?s fill, stroke, or contents on an individual basis.



InDesign CS3 will also offer designers more control over the way they select and work with multiple files.



"You will be able to select more than one graphic or text file in the Place dialog box, and when you click OK, you?ll see a small thumbnail of each image next to the Place cursor," InDesignSecrets said in its report. "You can then quickly place each image or text file into a frame with a 'click, click, click.' Even better, you can cycle through the images ?loaded? in the Place cursor with the arrow keys before clicking."



During the briefing, Adobe representatives said the adoption rate of InDesign CS2 has been extremely strong, especially in the magazine market.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 28
    fahlmanfahlman Posts: 694member
    I was talking to an Apple Specialist on the phone yesterday that I've known for a dozen years. I've always used this guy to do repairs that required an Apple Authorized Technician at the last three places I've worked. I also buy all my major equipment from him. I pay a little more but I get great service when necessary. Anyways, enough of the background. I've been talking to him about purchasing a MacBook for personal use. We also got on the subject of probably purchasing a new workstation for the office this summer when the "Mac Pro" is released and he mentioned that Adobe expects to have CS3 ready to ship as a Universal Binary when Apple ships the "MacPro". Lets hope he's right!
  • Reply 2 of 28
    kim kap solkim kap sol Posts: 2,987member
    Feature #2: Universal Binary







    Pretty insulting. Are you going to give money to a company that lists UB as a 'feature'?



    Let's get this straight...UB is not a feature...it's a fact of life. Adobe and MS belong together as entities that don't give two shits about their clients. They should watch out...they're in for surprises...you hear that Brucie?
  • Reply 3 of 28
    xanthohappyxanthohappy Posts: 102member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by kim kap sol

    Let's get this straight...UB is not a feature...it's a fact of life.



    You're right. I can't see Adobe listing that as a feature, when we all know it's a given unless they're planning on throwing away the market. I'm guessing that it was InDesignSecrets that saw it as a feature, and not Adobe. Note how the way they describe it comes off as an observation on their part, as opposed to some secret revealed to them by Adobe.
  • Reply 4 of 28
    While I welcome the feature in and of itself, and can imagine some useful applications, my first reaction was...



    Ye Gads more boilerplate Photoshop filters everywhere.



    Thanks, that's all.
  • Reply 5 of 28
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,946member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by kim kap sol

    Feature #2: Universal Binary







    Pretty insulting. Are you going to give money to a company that lists UB as a 'feature'?



    Let's get this straight...UB is not a feature...it's a fact of life. Adobe and MS belong together as entities that don't give two shits about their clients. They should watch out...they're in for surprises...you hear that Brucie?




    Then you can probably take your money to Quark. I hear they hold their customers in the highest regard.
  • Reply 6 of 28
    kim kap solkim kap sol Posts: 2,987member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by JeffDM

    Then you can probably take your money to Quark. I hear they hold their customers in the highest regard.



    Well I think I will Mister Smarty-pants!
  • Reply 7 of 28
    Oh boy ! bevels ! NOT.. Weee I can use 1980's filters on my work now.. wooo lets spend 1000 for that....
  • Reply 8 of 28
    deapeajaydeapeajay Posts: 909member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by tripdragon

    Oh boy ! bevels ! NOT.. Weee I can use 1980's filters on my work now.. wooo lets spend 1000 for that....



    ha ha ha Being a student is great! 250 baby!
  • Reply 9 of 28
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 30,731member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by JeffDM

    Then you can probably take your money to Quark. I hear they hold their customers in the highest regard.





    I'd rather stick with Adobe than Quark (and, by the way, I know you were being sarcastic... )
  • Reply 10 of 28
    splinemodelsplinemodel Posts: 7,311member
    What Adobe needs to make a bigger deal about is InCopy. There's no real equivalent for Quark, and it's easy enough to use that the people in your marketing department (etc) can use it, eliminating the hassle of MS Word (a.k.a. Satan) or handwritten notes.



    When you can turn a whole department away from MS Word, it's just such a beautiful thing.
  • Reply 11 of 28
    aplnubaplnub Posts: 2,584member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Splinemodel

    What Adobe needs to make a bigger deal about is InCopy. There's no real equivalent for Quark, and it's easy enough to use that the people in your marketing department (etc) can use it, eliminating the hassle of MS Word (a.k.a. Satan) or handwritten notes.



    When you can turn a whole department away from MS Word, it's just such a beautiful thing.




    My biggest complaint about InDesign is the fact it doesn't have a spell check / Word setup inside the text boxes.
  • Reply 12 of 28
    afalknerafalkner Posts: 73member
    I think we live in exciting times. a new Mac Pro with Adobe Creative suite 3.0 its all the machine any designer needs. Cant wait! Ill be the first to order!



    I cant wait!
  • Reply 13 of 28
    bikertwinbikertwin Posts: 564member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by fahlman

    he mentioned that Adobe expects to have CS3 ready to ship as a Universal Binary when Apple ships the "MacPro". Lets hope he's right!



    CS3 shipping before Vista's finished? Possible, but it seems unlikely.
  • Reply 14 of 28
    aplnubaplnub Posts: 2,584member
    Maybe Quarks early bird schedule has Adobe fearing for some market share loss. I hope so because they need a good kick in the pants.
  • Reply 15 of 28
    skatmanskatman Posts: 609member
    Looks like I'll have to hit Bit Torrent about 2 weeks before it's released in stores... :-)
  • Reply 16 of 28
    @homenow@homenow Posts: 998member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Splinemodel

    What Adobe needs to make a bigger deal about is InCopy. There's no real equivalent for Quark, and it's easy enough to use that the people in your marketing department (etc) can use it, eliminating the hassle of MS Word (a.k.a. Satan) or handwritten notes.



    When you can turn a whole department away from MS Word, it's just such a beautiful thing.




    Yea, but can you get them to stop putting in 2 spaces after a punctuation mark, or using spaces to get an indent (or tab alignment), or entering multiple tabs to tab over to the next line in stead of using a soft return? God, the manuscript text in "Final" files is going to get messy.
  • Reply 17 of 28
    knnethknneth Posts: 14member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by kim kap sol

    Feature #2: Universal Binary



    Pretty insulting. Are you going to give money to a company that lists UB as a 'feature'?





    Think of it from another perspective, not everyone is a computer expert. Not everyone cares what Universal Binary means, they just know Apple has hyped it to be this great 2 - 5 x faster application architecture so when your favorite desktop application comes around in a new version, which happens to be a Universal Binary — could it get any better? Besides that, why not list it? It'll get those with an Intel architecture who's built hatred for Rosetta more excited about CS3.
  • Reply 18 of 28
    @homenow@homenow Posts: 998member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by knneth

    Think of it from another perspective, not everyone is a computer expert. Not everyone cares what Universal Binary means, they just know Apple has hyped it to be this great 2 - 5 x faster application architecture so when your favorite desktop application comes around in a new version, which happens to be a Universal Binary — could it get any better? Besides that, why not list it? It'll get those with an Intel architecture who's built hatred for Rosetta more excited about CS3.



    I agree, Universal Bionary is going to be a big selling point for the next versioin of Adobe's CS line of products. This is especially true if Apple releases a standard "Mac" line, or gets the entry point for the MacPro line backdown to the $1499-1599 range. Another potential help would be the release of an iMac with a 22-23" screen. I'm specifically thinking about the "low end" graphics professional or graphics production computers here, which don't require all the horsepower for Photoshop or 3D applications, but do require a big screen (and with InDesign I personally find a 20" monitor constricting). This lower entry point, coupled with a new OS, and UB versions of the core Graphics applications might be enough to tempt the big print production houses to go out and replace the aging G4's that they have been putting off replacing due to the economy, not to mention replaceing their relatively new G5's that they have been buying to hedge against the "long" switch scheduele and uncertain release of the applications that they need for every day use.
  • Reply 19 of 28
    splinemodelsplinemodel Posts: 7,311member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by @homenow

    Yea, but can you get them to stop putting in 2 spaces after a punctuation mark, or using spaces to get an indent (or tab alignment), or entering multiple tabs to tab over to the next line in stead of using a soft return? God, the manuscript text in "Final" files is going to get messy.



    Two spaces after a period is not really a big deal to me, since I don't work for a newspaper. I prefer how two spaces spread the sentences over the new-age single space. I have paragraph presets that are used to do indenting and line spacing. The way InCopy works, it encourages users not to use tabs and the like, since it has an interface similar to the story editor in PageMaker. If you haven't been around that long, it's similar to the way a TeX program might work except without the clunky interface typical of open source apps. Plus, I did my job and provided enough teaching to make sure the job gets done right.



    At the end of the day, it's vastly superior than working with word.





    Quote:

    Originally posted by aplnub

    My biggest complaint about InDesign is the fact it doesn't have a spell check / Word setup inside the text boxes.



    It's not the best spell-checker, but there is one. Believe me, I have many complaints about InDesign, and if money were no object I'd be using Quark along with some Quark extensions, but one thing is certain: InDesign does have a spell-checker.
  • Reply 20 of 28
    @homenow@homenow Posts: 998member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Splinemodel

    Two spaces after a period is not really a big deal to me, since I don't work for a newspaper. I prefer how two spaces spread the sentences over the new-age single space. I have paragraph presets that are used to do indenting and line spacing. The way InCopy works, it encourages users not to use tabs and the like, since it has an interface similar to the story editor in PageMaker. If you haven't been around that long, it's similar to the way a TeX program might work except without the clunky interface typical of open source apps. Plus, I did my job and provided enough teaching to make sure the job gets done right.



    At the end of the day, it's vastly superior than working with word.







    I was being sarcastic, but the truth of the matter is that no matter how long the Editors have worked in the print Industry, and no matter how many times they have been told that you shouldn't do the above in manuscript for print production they still do it out of habbit, and a lot of time and effort are spent in cleaning these very common "mistakes" up for print production.



    InDesign/InCopy look like they are a very promissing solution, and I wasn't disagreeing with that. I have seen a number of demonstrations, and know that it is recieving a lot of attention. I don't know if it is really "There" yet, but I do know that it is being adopted by publishers now whether it is "There" or not.



    Oh, and not using two spaces between paragraphs is not just for newspapers, it is standard in books as well. This was something that was devised back in the days of fixed width characters on typewrighters, and is considered to be poor typography. It may be OK for you and your clients, but as far as I know it is pretty much a standard not to use two spaces in the publish industry overall. Not trying to be "snotty" here, if it works for you and your clients great.



    Quote:

    Originally posted by Splinemodel

    It's not the best spell-checker, but there is one. Believe me, I have many complaints about InDesign, and if money were no object I'd be using Quark along with some Quark extensions, but one thing is certain: InDesign does have a spell-checker.



    All OS X applications have spell check, it's built into the OS. If you have a 2 button mouse (or controll click) you can right click click on misspelled word and a list of options will come up in the contextual menue. I'm pointing this out becouse it is somthing that I find usefull that my wife taught me.
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