Foxconn: iPod factories get Apple approval

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
Quote:

Originally posted by jamezog

Apple may be able to turn this into some positive PR in the long run. Let's hope they can pull it off.



It's good to see you have your priorities in order. Who cares about the people working the extra 80 hours, as long as Apple comes out smelling like a rose.



Let's cross our fingers about Apple being able to spin this in their favor! Hate to have the stock dip a couple of points, or have to pay an additional $10 for a video iPod!
«1

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 26
    eaieai Posts: 417member
    YAY... This topic has gone out of order...



    Quote:

    Originally posted by JeffDM

    Does Adobe require anyone to sleep on company grounds in Adobe housing?



    Adobe housing would be kinda cool though...



    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adobe
  • Reply 2 of 26
    kolchakkolchak Posts: 1,398member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Kickaha

    The thing that I find rather amusing, is when I saw the picture of 'military style exercise drills', I thought 'company provided calisthenics'.



    Such things were compulsory and common in Japan in the 80s... a morning exercise routine was thought to wake every one up, and get them a minimum amount of exercise in their day. I can't really argue with it - if we had such a system here where I work, I can't say I'd complain.



    Spin is everything though... tag it with 'military style', and you can guarantee a large segment of the readership will be up in arms. No pun intended. No secondary pun intended either.




    I had the same thought when I read that caption. I guess most people out there don't remember the 1986 Michael Keaton comedy, "Gung Ho!"
  • Reply 3 of 26
    gene cleangene clean Posts: 3,481member
    Yeah, like Apple would admit to using people like slaves in military-style "factories". Denial ain't just a river in Egypt. Again.
  • Reply 4 of 26
    AppleInsiderAppleInsider Posts: 39,172administrator
    Apple Computer sent a special team overseas to investigate claims of unfair work environments within the Chinese manufacturing facilities that build its iPod digital music players but has found no problems, says Foxconn, the owner of facilities.



    According to a report by China CSR, Foxconn spokesperson Li Zong said the original equipment manufacturer's (OEM) complicated salary structure has caused misunderstanding among the media.



    The spokesperson said the company has paid its workers according to the minimum salary standards of the Shenzhen local government.



    At the same time, the China CSR report -- which is unclear in some of its source attributions -- said the Taiwanese manufacturer is now admitting that its employees work about 80 extra hours each month, which would place it in violation of Chinese labor laws.



    In China, a company is considered to have broken the law if it asks employees to work more than 36 extra hours each month, the report states.



    However, Zong said Apple "sent a special team" to the site of the factories to investigate the matter, but "found no problem."



    Foxconn had previously denied any claims of wrongdoing, saying it was in full compliance with Chinese labor laws.



    Both Foxconn and Apple have come under scrutiny after Britain's The Mail on Sunday this month published an exclusive report based on a first-hand account from within Foxconn's factories.



    The report alleged that Apple's iPods are built primary by female workers who labor 15-hour work days for as little as $50 a month. Some workers were reported to live in rooms occupied by 99 other employees and where visits from the outside world were prohibited.



    Last week, Apple announced a probe into the matter.



    "Apple is committed to ensuring that working conditions in our supply chain are safe, workers are treated with respect and dignity, and manufacturing processes are environmentally responsible," the company said.



    Dormitory at Foxconn's E3 factory | Image copyright Mail on Sunday.



    Military-style drills on the roof top at Foxconn | Image copyright Mail on Sunday.
  • Reply 5 of 26
    minderbinderminderbinder Posts: 1,703member
    Do we really know those photos are legit?



    And I assume the line about working 80 hours a MONTH is a typo? Most people would kill to work that little.
  • Reply 6 of 26
    guarthoguartho Posts: 1,208member
    Quote:

    80 extra hours each month



    emphasis mine.
  • Reply 7 of 26
    Quote:

    Originally posted by minderbinder

    Do we really know those photos are legit?



    And I assume the line about working 80 hours a MONTH is a typo? Most people would kill to work that little.




    Read it again. They worked 80 EXTRA hours a month.



    Is Apple guilty? Or was Foxconn hiding their real operations, like many Asain factories do when the clients come to town? Time will tell.



    None of this is good news for Apple, at least in the short run. But if they handle it properly, and show that they will not tolderate abusive labor, then they have an oppertunity to prove themselves AND influence the industry.
  • Reply 8 of 26
    nagrommenagromme Posts: 2,834member
    "found no problems," if true, does not mean problems didn't exist up until the inspection.



    The part about being locked away from visitors is insane. Apple should do random, UNannounced checks or FoxConn can just play nice on the day of the inspection.
  • Reply 9 of 26
    jamezogjamezog Posts: 163member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by sandboxface



    Is Apple guilty? Or was Foxconn hiding their real operations, like many Asain factories do when the clients come to town? Time will tell.



    None of this is good news for Apple, at least in the short run. But if they handle it properly, and show that they will not tolderate abusive labor, then they have an oppertunity to prove themselves AND influence the industry.




    Perhaps time will tell. Perhaps not - this is a Chinese company operating in China, after all. There's a lot of stuff about the Soviet era that many of us still know little (if anything) about.



    I do agree that the folks at Apple have the opportunity to prove themselves by this situation. Regardless of the credibility of the claims, Apple may be able to turn this into some positive PR in the long run. Let's hope they can pull it off.
  • Reply 10 of 26
    Quote:

    Originally posted by jamezog

    Perhaps time will tell. Perhaps not - this is a Chinese company operating in China, after all. There's a lot of stuff about the Soviet era that many of us still know little (if anything) about.



    We didn't have the internet in the Soviet era, nor did we have picture phones. I don't think you could compare the two. Our communication system are more sophisticated and are available to anyone who can afford it.
  • Reply 11 of 26
    chuckerchucker Posts: 5,089member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by nagromme

    The part about being locked away from visitors is insane.



    Oh, so you can knock at the door of, say, Adobe's headquarters and they'll just let you in?
  • Reply 12 of 26
    minderbinderminderbinder Posts: 1,703member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by sandboxface

    Read it again. They worked 80 EXTRA hours a month.



    Don't tell me to read it again, jackass. THEY CHANGED THE ARTICLE.



    It originally said "80 hours a month", the line after it is also new.





    I guess next time I'll be sure to quote the orignal article in my post.
  • Reply 13 of 26
    auroraaurora Posts: 1,142member
    Chineese Labor Law = do whatever you want as long as the Communist state isnt upset. This is Pure P.R. Bullsh from Apple and Foxcon. Apple QA has plummeted since going made in China.
  • Reply 14 of 26
    meelashmeelash Posts: 1,045member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by minderbinder

    Don't tell me to read it again, jackass. THEY CHANGED THE ARTICLE.



    It originally said "80 hours a month", the line after it is also new.





    I guess next time I'll be sure to quote the orignal article in my post.




    calm down there, buddy! How was he to know that they changed the article and you hadn't just misread?

    ...
  • Reply 15 of 26
    ?has nothing to do with the Chinese government or the party, it's all about money. If the Chinese factories won't meet the price point, the operation will move to Bangladesh or Ghana or wherever?



    Chinese workers also have a strange mentality about these things. If they need more money to feed their families they are as likely to strike for more hours as they are to strike for higher pay. This is no joke, they have (and will) strike to have their limits on hours lifted.



    Things are very different in China. People do what they must to get by. Working conditions will only improve when unions and *every government* gets involved.



    Google around for "race to the bottom".
  • Reply 16 of 26
    Quote:

    Originally posted by minderbinder

    I guess next time I'll be sure to quote the orignal article in my post.



    Who's the jackass?
  • Reply 17 of 26
    The labor issues in China are something that Apple ought to deal with when it comes to image. While it's important to keep costs low, it must also be far cheaper to improve the quality of life there, than it is to improve the quality of life here in the US. I would hope that Apple would move to make some improvements and to make sure that unannounced spot inspections occur. Apple can not afford to be seen running sweat shops.



    As for the iPods, what is up with the lack of quality in the iPods of late? Several of my friends (read - more than 6) have had to turn in iPods because they froze and couldn't be restored. Four of them have had to turn in more than one iPod in less than a year. My dad is on his fourth right now and he baby's them. Can anyone explain why it is that so many of my friends have so many issues with the new iPods? As it is I'm holding back from purchasing a new one and keeping my 40 GB Photo iPod which hasn't let me down. I won't buy a new one until I see quality control go back up.
  • Reply 18 of 26
    ricksbrainricksbrain Posts: 517member
    If Apple didn't know of this officially, would Steve pull the contract, even if it caused an iPod shortage?



    Would be interesting, no?
  • Reply 19 of 26
    kickahakickaha Posts: 8,760member
    The thing that I find rather amusing, is when I saw the picture of 'military style exercise drills', I thought 'company provided calisthenics'.



    Such things were compulsory and common in Japan in the 80s... a morning exercise routine was thought to wake every one up, and get them a minimum amount of exercise in their day. I can't really argue with it - if we had such a system here where I work, I can't say I'd complain.



    Spin is everything though... tag it with 'military style', and you can guarantee a large segment of the readership will be up in arms. No pun intended. No secondary pun intended either.
  • Reply 20 of 26
    buzdotsbuzdots Posts: 445member
    Since when is any company responsible for labor issues of one of its subcontractors?



    Especially a company in another country!!!



    How would any of you like for a foreign entity to send a team to the U.S.A. to investigate one of our companies labor policies? - and then catch hell from their constituents because they can't "reel us in and make us dance"



    For what it's worth here are the labor laws of China: http://www.usmra.com/china/Labour%20Law.htm



    Maybe Foxconn is in violation, but IT'S A PRC vs FOXCONN problem, not an Apple problem.
Sign In or Register to comment.