Paying for Shareware

Posted:
in Mac Software edited January 2014
Has any one else gotten Honest lately? I have found myself Paying for Shareware that Runs on OS X when I never did under the old OS.

I don't use a lot of Shareware on OS X yet. But I used Graphic Converter for YEARS with out paying, I bought it the other month after installing OS X and then other Shareware I like and Use I Paid for.

I feel so much better, Not that I am patting myself on the back for being honest for once!

I'd pay 1200 to 1500 for Adobe software, but couldn't pay some guy $20 for his simple application?

I repent.

Anyone else? <img src="graemlins/hmmm.gif" border="0" alt="[Hmmm]" />
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 23
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,129member
    Lemke's got some future money coming.



    I'm ok with paying for shareware once I know it's updated enough and will be sticking around.
  • Reply 2 of 23
    thuh freakthuh freak Posts: 2,664member
    my soul is black.

    i guess i'll go to hell. (what's that? there is no hell? cool!)
  • Reply 3 of 23
    amorphamorph Posts: 7,112member
    As soon as I stopped being a poor student, I got much better about registering shareware. I now have only one or two titles that I haven't registered, because they're relatively recent acquisitions, and they'll get registered when the next paycheck rolls in.



    I'm all for supporting the little guys. Much of the best software comes from independents who do something because they love to do it, and obsess over details because they only have to answer to their own standards.
  • Reply 4 of 23
    I finally broke down and got a PayPal account just to buy a piece of OS X shareware. Since then I've sold a couple things on eBay and just leave the money in PayPal account just for Shareware. When I find an app that I like, I pay.



    I hate when people say "I'll pay for that app when it gets this feature and that feature." The problem with that logic is, when no one pays for version 1.0, there is seldom a version 2.0.



    [ 08-21-2002: Message edited by: Michael Grey ]</p>
  • Reply 5 of 23
    alcimedesalcimedes Posts: 5,486member
    i've paid for a bunch. for me the biggest problem was how hard it was to pay in the past. now it's a lot easier, makes it much more likely that people will pay
  • Reply 6 of 23
    gmongmon Posts: 13member
    I will pay a shareware fee if the software is really good, and I find it indispensible. As such I have only paid one shareware fee, and that has gone to Mr. Andrew Welch.



    I would also have paid Mr. Lemke, had my company not already done so.
  • Reply 7 of 23
    Ambrosia gets my cash
  • Reply 8 of 23
    charlesscharless Posts: 301member
    I've got a few shareware products that I'm going to register as soon as I get my check from Kagi of money from people who registered my program. When I released version 1.0 of Pacifist as shareware, I realized that I'd finally have some spending money for this purpose. I'm actually kind of excited - I'll finally be able to get rid of a bunch of these "please register" screens, and it will feel good to support some shareware authors who have written some very useful programs that I use.



    [ 08-21-2002: Message edited by: CharlesS ]</p>
  • Reply 9 of 23
    klinuxklinux Posts: 453member
    Ditto what Amorph said. Now that I am working and understanding what working fulltime all the time is about, it seems wrong to freeload off of others.
  • Reply 10 of 23
    I agree with most of the above comments.



    You want to pirate a copy of MS Office or something... OK, I guess. You might be able to justify it by saying "MS doesn't need my money."



    But small software developers are people like you & me -- maybe even poorer than you and me! -- and even though they get used to a very small percentage of their users registering, everything helps. You can actually make a difference to these small (solo or "a few guys") developers with your very affordable registration.



    I was talking to a midi software developer (Windows platform only) at a party recently, and he said that he has hundreds of downloads for every single registration he gets. He has actually thought about giving up development on ALL his midi apps, because he can make more money on a weekend's "work for hire" coding or debugging for a bigger company, than he can on one of his apps that takes hundreds or even thousands of hours work. He keeps doing it for the right reasons, but he was clearly discouraged. He said "If even 5% of the people who used a program regularly, registered it, I would be ecstatic."



    Makes me wonder if the shareware software distribution idea isn't broken...
  • Reply 11 of 23
    majormattmajormatt Posts: 1,077member
    I made a shareware app, out of 1,050+ downloads of the latest version, no one paid the $3 fee.
  • Reply 12 of 23
    amorphamorph Posts: 7,112member
    [quote]Originally posted by sizzle chest:

    <strong>I agree with most of the above comments.



    You want to pirate a copy of MS Office or something... OK, I guess. You might be able to justify it by saying "MS doesn't need my money."



    But small software developers are people like you & me -- maybe even poorer than you and me! -- and even though they get used to a very small percentage of their users registering, everything helps.



    [sad story of shareware developer hoping for 5% registration rate.]



    Makes me wonder if the shareware software distribution idea isn't broken...</strong><hr></blockquote>



    The initial model was definitely overoptimistic, which is why crippleware, demoware and nagware have become more and more common.



    I don't think it's cause for pessimism so much as it's a misreading of the way people think. People are used to paying for something and then getting it (or in the case of restaurants, paying before they leave). Once you have something on your machine, it's "yours" in some basic way, and it's easy to forget that you actually haven't paid for it yet. Also, I think the relative difficulty of paying for shareware has accounted for a lot, although that's less true now - I remember printing out registration forms in good faith, and then simply forgetting to write the check, get the envelope and the stamp, and mail the silly thing. (This is why service providers send bills every month: To remind you that you have to pay them. And they're usually nice enough to send you an envelope, too.)



    It's been established that reminders that pop up at the end of sessions are among the most effective ones. If someone could set up a way to make it so that a window popped up with a Pay Now... button that asked you how you'd pay, and then let you click a button to finalize the transaction, I'd bet registration rates would jump. The Keychain could be adapted for this purpose, I think. As long as there was some way to make the transaction reliable, secure and simple it would be a great solution.



    Of course, your typical poor student would still be extremely erratic about paying, but that's forgiveable. You can't deny them their pizza money.
  • Reply 13 of 23
    I pay for what I use. If I think something's too expensive for my taste (or just not worth it), I won't pay and I'll stop using it. I'm not rich, but I want people to be compensated for their work.



    When people request donations but don't require it, it always depends on where I am financially at the time and whether I'm blown away by the software or service. I've donated to websites I've found invaluable and I've paid donationware "fees," but of course I don't always do it when requested.



    I don't know when this started for me. I think there was an app or two I used in college that I didn't pay for. Heh. I was a Windows user then. Don't know if that has anything to do with it. But I've paid for software on Windows, OS 9 and OS X. Moreso on OS X, only because I was only on OS 9 for a few months before switching to X. Since I knew it, I didn't want to be too "invested" in the software.



    With all the piracy that goes on with commercial software, I kind of feel that I am paying shareware fees when I pay for the expensive software like Photoshop, etc. These guys would have killer margins and solid profits if everyone paid, but, since everyone doesn't, they tend to struggle. &lt;g&gt; Though Microsoft's managed to deal with it pretty well, eh?



    Alex.
  • Reply 14 of 23
    I definitely believe in paying for shareware but only pay for what you are really going to use. I will download programs and use them for about a week....if it only gets used once a month or once period, I won't pay the fee.



    When I see myself using it everyday or quite frequently, then yes, I will pay for it and I have.



    I think more people should.
  • Reply 15 of 23
    I find myself paying for shareware a lot more on OS X. It is definitely partly because I have more money now and out of solidarity for my fellow programmers, but there is also a lot more shareware on X that I feel compelled to buy. I think this is a great development for the Macintosh community.
  • Reply 16 of 23
    serranoserrano Posts: 1,806member
    The older I get the more software I pay for.



    As much as my paycheck allows.
  • Reply 17 of 23
    jbljbl Posts: 555member
    The fact that you have a lot of downloads doesn't necessarily mean that there are a lot of people using your software. I probably only pay for 5% of the software I download, but I probably only use 2% of the software I download more than a couple times. I have downloaded 5 backup/synch programs but none of them proved as fast/easy/reliable as simply copying my hard disk to an external hard disk once a week. I downloaded a few spreadsheets and even paid for two, but it turns out there are fucntions in Excel that I really need so I pretty much only use Excel. Etc.
  • Reply 18 of 23
    Yea, I admit that I really got to like it to pay.

    I like the fact that it is almost a quick and painless process to pay now and that makes me pay more often.
  • Reply 19 of 23
    charlesscharless Posts: 301member
    [quote]Originally posted by JBL:

    <strong>The fact that you have a lot of downloads doesn't necessarily mean that there are a lot of people using your software. I probably only pay for 5% of the software I download, but I probably only use 2% of the software I download more than a couple times. I have downloaded 5 backup/synch programs but none of them proved as fast/easy/reliable as simply copying my hard disk to an external hard disk once a week. I downloaded a few spreadsheets and even paid for two, but it turns out there are fucntions in Excel that I really need so I pretty much only use Excel. Etc.</strong><hr></blockquote>



    Another thing to consider is that some of the people downloading your latest version will be people that already registered an older version and are just trying to keep up to date...
  • Reply 20 of 23
    defiantdefiant Posts: 4,876member
    well, if I wouldn't be here in Switzerland, and if it wouldn't be so difficult for me to pay, even with PayPal, I would pay the shareware fee.



    and so, for the moment, long live SerialSurfers!!!
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