Apple reiterates: no interest in virtualization for Leopard

Posted:
in macOS edited January 2014
Speaking to an analyst this month, executives for Apple Computer maintained that the company has no plans to incorporate virtualization technology into the final version of its Boot Camp software that will ship as part of Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard next spring.



"Apple indicated that it is very pleased with Parallels software and didn't feel the need to compete with its own version of embedded virtualization," Bear Stearns analyst Andy Neff wrote in a research note to clients this week.



The analyst recently partook in a sit-down chat with Apple Chief Financial Officer Peter Oppenheimer and Vice President of iPod Product Marketing Greg Joswiak to discuss the company's financials and future business directions.



"Apple noted that the key advantage of the current beta of Boot Camp is its superior performance in both Mac and Windows environments, while running two virtual OS environments (like Parallels) results in performance degradation," he added.



The latest round comments echo those made by Apple Vice President of Worldwide Marketing Phil Schiller back in July.



When asked by Needham & Co. analyst Charles Wolf whether the company planned to offer virtualization in Leopard, Schiller responded firmly by saying "absolutely not, the R&D would be prohibitive and we?re not going to do it. Our solution is dual boot."



Turning a deaf ear to ongoing rumors and speculation surrounding the matter, the folks over at Parallels have remained focused on strengthening their industry leading $80 virtualization software package. The solution, dubbed "Parallels Desktop for Mac," has been seeing enhancements on almost a monthly basis.



On friday, AppleInsider reported on a major upgrade to Parallels Desktop currently in the works by the Renton, Wash.-based software developer that will deliver tight integration with Apple's Boot Camp software among dozens of other enhancements.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 47
    brussellbrussell Posts: 9,812member
    I think it's the right decision. Let parallels and vmware take care of that option. Bootcamp just works - virtualization is nicer in many ways, but much messier.
  • Reply 2 of 47
    This really shouldn't surprise anyone, though most of us were hoping it would be included. I am more interested to see the Parallels performance using a BootCamp drive. Will having the ATI graphics and proper Windows drivers installed on the drive increase performance than previous versions of Parallels? True, we still have two OS's running at the same time, so RAM and Proc will be an issue.



    But yeah, still excited to see what Apple may have up their sleeve on 10.5.



    (Yay first post for a newbie)
  • Reply 3 of 47
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 32,959member
    Two things.



    One is that I hope that MS doesn't buy Parallels as they did VPC, and two, it might not be a bad idea for Apple to do so.
  • Reply 4 of 47
    For me Vista is really just a great Game OS.

    All I want is to be able to work all day in MacOS X to make money.



    To buy games to play in Vista. Supreme Commander specifically.



    Face it. Vista with Direct X 10 looks like a fantastic games platform. Being able to buy one machine to run them all is just smart.
  • Reply 5 of 47
    emig647emig647 Posts: 2,426member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mcloki


    For me Vista is really just a great Game OS.

    All I want is to be able to work all day in MacOS X to make money.



    To buy games to play in Vista. Supreme Commander specifically.



    Face it. Vista with Direct X 10 looks like a fantastic games platform. Being able to buy one machine to run them all is just smart.



    Yes, Vista with DirectX 10 looks great. BUT most games out there take a 10-25fps hit moving from XP to Vista. I don't think Vista will be a great gaming os for quite some time.
  • Reply 6 of 47
    eckingecking Posts: 1,588member
    It's smart for apple to back 3rd party developers instead of competing against them. It reflects good on the company and doesn't deter any other enterprising company that may be thinking about the apple platform but if afraid of competition from apple itself.
  • Reply 7 of 47
    irelandireland Posts: 17,743member
    This is obvious, anytime I use Windows I plug out my internet connection anyway. Just uninstalled Windows two days ago. I have Vista under Parallels now, but don't use it.
  • Reply 8 of 47
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by melgross


    Two things.



    One is that I hope that MS doesn't buy Parallels as they did VPC, and two, it might not be a bad idea for Apple to do so.



    Talk about nightmare scenarios. Apple needs to form some kind of commitment to these guys or once again get Apple's nuts in the crusher.
  • Reply 9 of 47
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 2,422member
    Would rather see Apple help out the Wine project which brings the Windows API to other operating systems; Using Crossover, I'm already able to run Office 97 and Internet Explorer 6 under Tiger without needing Windows installed. I'd also like to see Apple release Cocoa for Windows and possible even Linux. Together, these would remove some users need to install and run Windows, helping to break Microsoft's stranglehold on the industry.
  • Reply 10 of 47
    feynmanfeynman Posts: 1,087member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mjtomlin


    Would rather see Apple help out the Wine project which brings the Windows API to other operating systems; Using Crossover, I'm already able to run Office 97 and Internet Explorer 6 under Tiger without needing Windows installed. I'd also like to see Apple release Cocoa for Windows and possible even Linux. Together, these would remove some users need to install and run Windows, helping to break Microsoft's stranglehold on the industry.



    Two words: Yellow Box
  • Reply 11 of 47
    feynmanfeynman Posts: 1,087member
    Personally I like the rumor by LoopRumors.com; using Fast User Switching to switch to a live Windows desktop, without having to dual boot. The more I think about this though, I suppose it would not be much different then Parallels would it? Would use memory and processing power with Mac OS X still running....hmmm....
  • Reply 12 of 47
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by emig647


    Yes, Vista with DirectX 10 looks great. BUT most games out there take a 10-25fps hit moving from XP to Vista. I don't think Vista will be a great gaming os for quite some time.



    Oh. that's too bad. Some of the screens from Crysis look spectacular. But with a really powerful new quad core or possible Ocho-Core Mac and the latest and greatest Graphics card is that really going to come into play? Lucky for me, next year is Mac Desktop upgrade time.

    Thnaks for the info
  • Reply 13 of 47
    nerudaneruda Posts: 430member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mcloki


    Oh. that's too bad. Some of the screens from Crysis look spectacular. But with a really powerful new quad core or possible Ocho-Core Mac and the latest and greatest Graphics card is that really going to come into play? Lucky for me, next year is Mac Desktop upgrade time.

    Thnaks for the info



    Yeah. Echoing what Emig said, everything I've read suggests that Vista will not be a gamer's dream come true (lower frame rates, performance hits from all that useless eyecandy).

    http://www.osweekly.com/index.php?op...k=view&id=2388
  • Reply 14 of 47
    I'm looking forward to buying Parallels when I get a new MacBook in a couple months, but I've always wondered why Parallels chose to combine the Parallels Desktop with the Compressor product and raise the price? I don't really want the Compressor.
  • Reply 15 of 47
    deanbardeanbar Posts: 110member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mjtomlin


    Would rather see Apple help out the Wine project which brings the Windows API to other operating systems; Using Crossover, I'm already able to run Office 97 and Internet Explorer 6 under Tiger without needing Windows installed. I'd also like to see Apple release Cocoa for Windows and possible even Linux. Together, these would remove some users need to install and run Windows, helping to break Microsoft's stranglehold on the industry.



    Forget Office 97, go to OpenOffice.org and download OpenOffice. It runs on both Windows and Mac, and is compatible with MS Office. I've downloaded it on both my PC and Mac. Knocks spots off MS Office, and it's free. No need to buy from MS ever again!!
  • Reply 16 of 47
    natannatan Posts: 15member
    these are all good solutions but it is anoying that if you want to do this you have to go out and by a suprisingly expensive verstion of windows and install it. the 200 to 300 dollar price tag is all that is keeping me from doing it . parellels solution works great and is helping the mac patform. apple sees no need to spend time and money to compete with an ally.
  • Reply 17 of 47
    louzerlouzer Posts: 1,054member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Neruda


    Yeah. Echoing what Emig said, everything I've read suggests that Vista will not be a gamer's dream come true (lower frame rates, performance hits from all that useless eyecandy).

    http://www.osweekly.com/index.php?op...k=view&id=2388



    Wow, is that anything like the performance hit from OS X's useless eye candy?
  • Reply 18 of 47
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 32,959member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Louzer


    Wow, is that anything like the performance hit from OS X's useless eye candy?



    The reasons I've seen for that has to do with the fact that MS changed much graphics coding, and the games that are out are coded for XP. Once they are reworked, and new games come out, it will be fine.
  • Reply 19 of 47
    inklinginkling Posts: 731member
    I agree with the previous poster that Apple would do well to quietly detail a couple of clever programmers to assist the WINE/Crossover project. Most potential Mac buyers have, at most, one or two Windows programs that they need to run. In that situation the cost and virus risks of Windows are too great. Wine lets them run Windows applications on Macs without Windows or the risk of Windows virsuses.



    While they're at it, Apple should do something about the one-and-only major application that doesn't have a Mac or open source counterpart--FrameMaker. The loss of Classic with Intel hardware means we can no longer run older Mac versions of FrameMaker on current Macs. With a bit of effort from the right people, the Wine compatibility rating of FrameMaker could be raised from Bronze to Gold.



    If Apple wants to sell high-end Mac Pro desktops to the engineering and scientific community, they need a way to run FrameMaker on Macs. There's nothing around that can handle lengthy, complex documents like it can.
  • Reply 20 of 47
    emig647emig647 Posts: 2,426member
    Melgross,

    While that may be true, you can't dismiss the eye candy vista brings to the table has a performance hit. The whole operating system uses MUCH more resources than xp ever thought of. A lot of that is from aero. WinSAT rated my system a 4 out of 5 with a 7900gs, 1.5gigs of ram, and an athlon 64 3400+ venice. Pretty sad. I'm not going to upgrade my system so I can run vista at full bore AND games too. I think I'll be waiting quite a while for D10 games.
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