Cisco and Apple settle iPhone Trademark dispute

Posted:
in iPod + iTunes + AppleTV edited January 2014
Cisco and Apple said Wednesday that they have resolved their dispute involving the ?iPhone? trademark.



Under the agreement, both companies are free to use the ?iPhone? trademark on their products throughout the world.



Both companies acknowledge the trademark ownership rights that have been granted, and each side will dismiss any pending actions regarding the trademark.



In addition, Cisco and Apple will explore opportunities for interoperability in the areas of security, and consumer and enterprise communications.



Other terms of the agreement remained confidential.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 33
    I vote that Cisco stop making poopy VPN clients and ask for Apple to help on the mac side ;-) Also they should just release the darned thing, since every huge company in silicon valley I've ever worked for could never get access to the latest updates, especially for Macs which was a huge problem AND STILL IS.
  • Reply 2 of 33
    I guess the soap opera is over. Go Apple! And how much will you bet that AAPL goes DOWN tomorrow?!
  • Reply 3 of 33
    MacProMacPro Posts: 18,368member
    Common sense can prevail!
  • Reply 4 of 33
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    Cisco and Apple said Wednesday that they have resolved their dispute involving the ?iPhone? trademark.



    Under the agreement, both companies are free to use the ?iPhone? trademark on their products throughout the world.



    Both companies acknowledge the trademark ownership rights that have been granted, and each side will dismiss any pending actions regarding the trademark.



    In addition, Cisco and Apple will explore opportunities for interoperability in the areas of security, and consumer and enterprise communications.



    Other terms of the agreement remained confidential.



    Therefore, all the hoopla over trademark thingy was only to generate buzz. And I think both companies agreed to it - any publicity is good publicity. It did remain in the news for quite a while. Good that they decided to end it (not solve it, it was already solved probably!)
  • Reply 5 of 33
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by iPoodOverZune View Post


    Therefore, all the hoopla over trademark thingy was only to generate buzz. And I think both companies agreed to it - any publicity is good publicity. It did remain in the news for quite a while. Good that they decided to end it (not solve it, it was already solved probably!)



    I would normally agree and it may still result in added demand for the Apple iPhone but Apples stock has been depressed since the dispute was announced. Today when the dispute was resolved the stock jumped $3.30 but is still down almost $6 from the peak it reached moments after the iPhone announcement.
  • Reply 6 of 33
    irelandireland Posts: 17,671member
    So Apple has the rights to use 'Apple' and 'iPhone', now just let them get on with it.
  • Reply 7 of 33
    Doesn't solve the "dispute" over iPhone still raging in Canada, though.



    This also means that iPhone is a weak trademark for protection. I think we can look forward to seeing Mattel come out with Barbie's Dream iPhone hitting the shelves in time for Christmas.
  • Reply 8 of 33
    slewisslewis Posts: 2,080member
    Damn it! Apple Insider beat me to it. I just came across it like 2 minutes ago.



    Sebastian
  • Reply 9 of 33
    This is good news. NOBODY BITCH PLEASE! Just be happy.
  • Reply 10 of 33
    The announcement didn't reach the "market" until after closing. The stock went up today for other reasons.





    Quote:
    Originally Posted by PowerMacBandit View Post


    I would normally agree and it may still result in added demand for the Apple iPhone but Apples stock has been depressed since the dispute was announced. Today when the dispute was resolved the stock jumped $3.30 but is still down almost $6 from the peak it reached moments after the iPhone announcement.



  • Reply 11 of 33
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by willrob View Post


    The announcement didn't reach the "market" until after closing. The stock went up today for other reasons.



    Neither the dispute, nor the resolution were huge deals for either company. Apple could just as easily chosen to go with ApplePhone, and they still might for another "exclusive" line with another partner.
  • Reply 12 of 33
    I'm so confused. I sure hope I don't buy the wrong product in June.
  • Reply 13 of 33
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post


    Neither the dispute, nor the resolution were huge deals for either company. Apple could just as easily chosen to go with ApplePhone, and they still might for another "exclusive" line with another partner.



    In the long run no but in the short run it's stock has definitely reacted.
  • Reply 14 of 33
    slewisslewis Posts: 2,080member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Caribou Killa View Post


    This is good news. NOBODY BITCH PLEASE! Just be happy.



    Deleted to make some changes
  • Reply 15 of 33
    slewisslewis Posts: 2,080member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Caribou Killa View Post


    This is good news. NOBODY BITCH PLEASE! Just be happy.



    ? åµ ßø ˙åππ¥ ?˙å? Åππ¬´ å?∂ Ç?ßçø ®´∑åç˙´∂ å ß´??¬´µ?? ∫´çå¨ß´ ?ø∑ ?? çå? ß?øπ π¬å©¨??© µ¥ ∂å?¬¥ ˝øø©¬´ ß´å®ç˙´ß≥



  • Reply 16 of 33
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Slewis View Post


    ? åµ ßø ?å??¥ ??å? Å??¬´ å?? Ç?ßçø ®´?åç?´? å ß´??¬´µ?? ?´çå¨ß´ ?ø? ?? çå? ß?ø? ?¬å©¨??© µ¥ ?å?¬¥ ?øø©¬´ ß´å®ç?´ß?



  • Reply 17 of 33
    SFGate



    The sticking point apparently was Cisco's demand that in order to use the iPhone name, Apple would have to open up its famously closed products to communicate with some of Cisco's offerings.



    Neither company would discuss what future products might come from the collaboration. But analysts said the deal could help both companies strengthen their positions in the increasingly fierce battle to deliver video and other applications through the network directly to consumers' homes.



    Zeus Kerravala, a network infrastructure analyst with Yankee Group, said there are ample opportunities for the companies to dream up collaborative projects to win over consumers.

    One possibility, he said, could be the creation of a Linksys device that users call into to record podcasts that are then automatically uploaded to iTunes, which would make the creation and dissemination of such programs easier.

    However, he cautioned that both companies need to be willing to share in order to make the partnership work.



    "If the two actually can work together, then the combination of the two is obviously more powerful than the two butting heads," he said. "There's no company out there that understands network service like Cisco. And you could argue no other company understands user experience like Apple."



    The dispute highlights the shifting business strategies for both companies.

    Cisco, which is Silicon Valley's most richly valued company with a market capitalization of $166 billion, makes most of its money by selling the routers and switches that direct data traffic over computer networks.



    However, the San Jose-based company is also making an aggressive push into the consumer market and toward products that help deliver content, such as cable set-top boxes, wireless broadband routers for the home, and equipment for playing digital music.

    Cupertino-based Apple is also expanding its business range from beyond primarily a Macintosh computer and software maker as it capitalizes on the demand for digital music and the soaring popularity of its iTunes and iPod products.
  • Reply 18 of 33
    slewisslewis Posts: 2,080member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post


    What the heck? Looks like Woodstock's chickenscratch language.... watch it buddy!





    An Alternative to English



    Sebastian
  • Reply 19 of 33
    slewisslewis Posts: 2,080member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bitman View Post


    SFGate



    The sticking point apparently was Cisco's demand that in order to use the iPhone name, Apple would have to open up its famously closed products to communicate with some of Cisco's offerings.



    Neither company would discuss what future products might come from the collaboration. But analysts said the deal could help both companies strengthen their positions in the increasingly fierce battle to deliver video and other applications through the network directly to consumers' homes.



    Zeus Kerravala, a network infrastructure analyst with Yankee Group, said there are ample opportunities for the companies to dream up collaborative projects to win over consumers.

    One possibility, he said, could be the creation of a Linksys device that users call into to record podcasts that are then automatically uploaded to iTunes, which would make the creation and dissemination of such programs easier.

    However, he cautioned that both companies need to be willing to share in order to make the partnership work.



    "If the two actually can work together, then the combination of the two is obviously more powerful than the two butting heads," he said. "There's no company out there that understands network service like Cisco. And you could argue no other company understands user experience like Apple."



    The dispute highlights the shifting business strategies for both companies.

    Cisco, which is Silicon Valley's most richly valued company with a market capitalization of $166 billion, makes most of its money by selling the routers and switches that direct data traffic over computer networks.



    However, the San Jose-based company is also making an aggressive push into the consumer market and toward products that help deliver content, such as cable set-top boxes, wireless broadband routers for the home, and equipment for playing digital music.

    Cupertino-based Apple is also expanding its business range from beyond primarily a Macintosh computer and software maker as it capitalizes on the demand for digital music and the soaring popularity of its iTunes and iPod products.



    I don't buy it. It's very obvious how the 2 came to a settlement.



    Cisco had it in the US but Apple had it everywhere else. If you go to the Story on Apple's site it states very clearly that the 2 can now both use the name anywhere in the world, including the US.



    Apple does things alone, for the most part. Cisco doesn't really need Apple and Apple definitely doesn't need Cisco, no matter how valued the 2 may be in terms of money, Apple is worth far much more in terms of brand recognition.



    Sebastian
  • Reply 20 of 33
    Since the agreement is confidential, it is hard to say if someone "won." I think that they are both winners now. And it just feels good. Like good business.



    I recall Cisco's CEO saying that they have never filed a trademark dispute suit before? I am uncertain if this is true or not, but they certainly seem open and honorable in this situation. Finally a suit handled by both parties with a positive mutual agreement instead of extortion.



    I certainly have much better will now towards Cisco now. And without insider knowledge, it's hard to say if Apple was at fault in the first place or not.



    So we can all just forget about this and move on. I for one hope that Apple and Cisco work together on some cool interoperability. Perhaps Apple can take the first step here?
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