Apple places new limits on iPhone sales

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
Apple last week stopped accepting cash for iPhone purchases and reinstated a two-per-person sales limit in an effort to curb the black market for unlocked versions of the touch-screen handset.



The new policy began Thursday, Apple spokeswoman Natalie Kerris told the Associated Press. Before then, there was no cash restriction and the purchase limit was five per person.



"Customer response to the iPhone has been off the charts, and limiting iPhone sales to two per customer helps us ensure that there are enough iPhones for people who are shopping for themselves or buying a gift," Kerris said. "We're requiring a credit or debit card for payment to discourage unauthorized resellers."



Since introducing iPhone on June 29th, Apple has sold over 1.4 million of the handsets, the company announced as part of its fiscal fourth quarter earnings last week. However, it estimated that approximately 250,000 of those iPhones were sold to buyers who intended to unlock them and then resell them for use on wireless networks other than AT&T.



The new sales restrictions are the latest moves by Apple in its game of cat and mouse with iPhone hackers. Last month, it released iPhone software update 1.1.1, which rendered unlocked iPhones effectively useless.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 64
    This is kind of bull shit. What do they care how people want to pay? What if I don't believe in Credit Cards I can't get a phone?



    The truth is they hate receiving cash period. Apple Retail Employees are forced to use those stupid hand held cash machines because it gets Apple two things, your credit card number and your email address. I'm sure this new CC only for iPhones is just the beginning. Soon Apple Retail will be CC only.
  • Reply 2 of 64
    People have been getting bent out of shape and hyperventilating about this on places like cnet.com and engadget.com all weekend long.



    All I can figure is that there are lots of resellers in those audiences.



    Call me a fanboy, but despite the fact that it might inconvenience an occasional person who wanted to buy it just by himself/herself for a large family, I am with Apple on this one. With 15% to 20% of all sales being unlocked phones, creating a significant mass of user experience that is misaligned with what Apple intended could lead a lot of potential problems for Apple -- e.g., these same types will be caterwauling about broken software and hardware because of Apple's inability or unwillingness to fix it. In addition, use along those lines stiffs a partner -- albeit one that is not terribly sympathetic figure -- with whom Apple had entered into a good faith agreement. Finally, nothing would be worse that for Apple to introduce this in the UK, Germany, and France, and not have enough to meet demand. There will be a lot of p-o'ed customers that will have migrated to other smartphones.



    I am amazed that people can't wait a few months. (On the other hand, as a shareholder, I must admit to being thrilled at what this presages re. demand for the product!).
  • Reply 3 of 64
    It's business tactics like this that draw me further and further away from Apple. I'm in between Macs, sold my iBook and haven't bought a replacement yet, but the more 'news' Apple makes the less I like them as a company. I'm sure there are two sides to this but I don't think there is a shortage of iPhones for sale, so what gives?
  • Reply 4 of 64
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by polvadis View Post


    It's business tactics like this that draw me further and further away from Apple. I'm in between Macs, sold my iBook and haven't bought a replacement yet, but the more 'news' Apple makes the less I like them as a company. I'm sure there are two sides to this but I don't think there is a shortage of iPhones for sale, so what gives?



    What gives is that they're making some effort to keep on good terms with AT&T. Eventually, Apple will gain enough power in this market to shun its partners, but for now, without AT&T, there is no future for the iPhone. People keep forgetting that.



    How much of an impact on this tactic will have on the unlocking business is debatable. I doubt it will stop many at all. But it will placate AT&T for now.
  • Reply 5 of 64
    Apple just wants control over the platform.



    Better in the long run, methinks...



    addition to post:

    - after having unlocked a bunch of U.S. phones for EU use.

    - stw
  • Reply 6 of 64
    nagrommenagromme Posts: 2,834member
    I always think it's best to assume the absolute worst. The press and anonymous commenters alike love to spin anything about Apple to mean the worst it could possibly mean. Believing them uncritically is the sensible route. Also: be sure to assume that AT&T has no say in protecting their agreements/contracts--it's sure to be 100% Apple's evil doing.



    I feel just awful for all the folks with bad credit who wanted 3 iPhones



    Question 1: is this two per household, or two per individual, or two per credit card, or two per day?



    Question 2: will they accept a money order or check?



    Question 3: will they accept a debit card or a pre-paid/secured credit card (both of which people with bad credit can still get)?



    Question 4: will they take your credit card without getting your email address? (I can answer that from my own experience: Yes.)
  • Reply 7 of 64
    I agree with this move, but it would probably achieve the same result to just limit cash unit sales to a single phone per person per week, something like that. That way cash customers would not be out of luck.
  • Reply 8 of 64
    I don't know how the law is in the US but they certainly couldn't do that in the UK. Cash is legal tender. If they are selling something to the public they are obliged to accept cash.
  • Reply 9 of 64
    desarcdesarc Posts: 642member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jawporta View Post


    This is kind of bull shit. What do they care how people want to pay? What if I don't believe in Credit Cards I can't get a phone?



    if you don't believe in credit cards you're only going to get a pre-paid / pay-as-you-go phone anyway, and if you're trying to live "off the grid" why the 'ell would you get an iPhone? [or be online posting comments...]
  • Reply 10 of 64
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Isidore View Post


    I don't know how the law is in the US but they certainly couldn't do that in the UK. Cash is legal tender. If they are selling something to the public they are obliged to accept cash.



    It's just as illegal here and I'm astonished they're getting away with it.



    "This note is legal tender for all debts, public and private"



    You can't refuse cash.
  • Reply 11 of 64
    Gee nagromme, I would'a thought you would at least take the time to read the article before you go overboard on the negative.

    Why don't you just assume all computers break and don't buy anything?



    The two per person limit, is just that. It's the same as they had for 5 phones... now it's two.

    That means you can walk in and buy two.

    Next week you can walk in and buy 2 more. The day after that, you can walk in and buy 2 more.



    Ah, were you on here complaining about the 5 phone limit?

    Do you have a problem with Apple or the policy?





    So your question #1 is already known by everyone. (except you.... maybe?)



    #2 - Do they take checks?

    What ever the store policy is for ANYTHING else they sell.

    They just won't take CASH for iPhones.



    That takes care of #2..... for those reading the article.



    As for question #3, they SAID THEY TAKE DEBIT, and a secured credit card IS A CREDIT CARD!

    So you should understand the article said they take credit cards.



    As for question #4, you already answered it.

    The ONLY reason they need an email address.... is if YOU want them to email YOU a receipt.

    Now, I'm not sure how you can blame THEM for a service they provide YOU.





    I can tell you feel terrible for all those people with really bad credit that can't buy three iPhones during one visit.

    I wonder, when carriers like AT%T won't sell service to them because their credit is so bad they can't even get a credit card, are you on THEIR websites blasting them?
  • Reply 12 of 64
    cameronjcameronj Posts: 2,357member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by nagromme View Post


    Question 4: will they take your credit card without getting your email address? (I can answer that from my own experience: Yes.)



    Exactly. To all you dummies who complain about having to give your email address out, guess what? You don't. When they ask, just say "I'd rather not." Same with zip codes. You don't have to give any of that info. If you're dumb enough to give them info that they ASK for, and then even dumber to complain that you gave it, well, there's no hope for you.
  • Reply 13 of 64
    bageljoeybageljoey Posts: 1,738member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by desarc View Post


    if you don't believe in credit cards you're only going to get a pre-paid / pay-as-you-go phone anyway, and if you're trying to live "off the grid" why the 'ell would you get an iPhone? [or be online posting comments...]







    People just like to complain. They may have no interest in being consistent...
  • Reply 14 of 64
    Since I first reported this, now we have two threads... what's up?



    http://forums.appleinsider.com/showthread.php?t=80367
  • Reply 15 of 64
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Isidore View Post


    I don't know how the law is in the US but they certainly couldn't do that in the UK. Cash is legal tender. If they are selling something to the public they are obliged to accept cash.



    Expect another massive class-action lawsuit shortly.
  • Reply 16 of 64
    bageljoeybageljoey Posts: 1,738member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by wbrasington View Post


    Gee nagromme, I would'a thought you would at least take the time to read the article before you go overboard on the negative.

    Why don't you just assume all computers break and don't buy anything?

    <snip>

    I can tell you feel terrible for all those people with really bad credit that can't buy three iPhones during one visit.

    I wonder, when carriers like AT%T won't sell service to them because their credit is so bad they can't even get a credit card, are you on THEIR websites blasting them?



    Actually, I think nagromme started out tongue-in-cheek and then was asking the listed questions semi-rhetorically--to point out that there would still be options to satisfy people.

    Even if I read it wrong, I think your response is over the top. \
  • Reply 17 of 64
    nagrommenagromme Posts: 2,834member
    It's OK - I enjoyed the response
  • Reply 18 of 64
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ensign Pulver View Post


    It's just as illegal here and I'm astonished they're getting away with it.



    "This note is legal tender for all debts, public and private"



    You can't refuse cash.



    Legal tender can't be refused to settle DEBT. Private parties, including buisness, don't have to accept cash. Think about how many places refuse large bills.
  • Reply 19 of 64
    Who carries $400 around? if you dont have a credit card, that might be an indication you better spend the $400 somewhere else..



    i say the impact is not very much



    besides i personally never seen anyone buys an iphone without a credit card.
  • Reply 20 of 64
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by amador_o View Post


    Legal tender can't be refused to settle DEBT. Private parties, including buisness, don't have to accept cash. Think about how many places refuse large bills.



    Apple is a *public* (not private) traded company.
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