Intel to launch first quad-core notebook chip by Fall

Posted:
in Future Apple Hardware edited January 2014
Intel is readying its first quad-core mobile processor for a release during the third quarter of 2008, though elevated pricing and power requirements make it seem unlikely that the chip will immediately find its way in Apple's notebook systems.



Citing sources at motherboard makers, DigiTimes claims the chip -- dubbed the Core 2 Extreme QX9300 -- will set a new high for pricing at $1,038 a piece in thousand-unit allotments when it makes its debut sometime between the months of July and September.



The 45-nanometer design will sport a core frequency of 2.53GHz, support for up to a 1066MHz front-side bus, and include 12MB of Level 2 cache. But with demand for high-end notebook systems reportedly below average, "Intel expects the quad-core notebook CPUs will not become standard in the performance/mainstream notebook market until the second half of 2009."



Also working against immediate widespread adoption is the chip's thermal design power (TDP) of 45-watts, compared to the 35-watt range of today's mainstream mobile Core 2 Duo processors.



While providing the first hints at CPU last April, Intel mobile chief Mooly Eden noted that this specification would limit usage to high-level gaming and mobile workstations, where users are willing to trade battery life for more performance.



"You'll see it at the high-end, but I don't see it running so fast into the mainstream because I don't believe there will be enough threaded applications that will justify the tradeoffs," he said.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 68
    get this bad-boy in the iMac then!
  • Reply 2 of 68
    ajayajay Posts: 117member
    if this baby gets into mac laptops, i would suggest a name change from MacBook Air to MacBook Tornado!
  • Reply 3 of 68
    backtomacbacktomac Posts: 4,579member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ajay View Post


    if this baby gets into mac laptops, i would suggest a name change from MacBook Air to MacBook Inferno!



    There, FTFY.
  • Reply 4 of 68
    emig647emig647 Posts: 2,409member
    I MIGHT be able to drop the need for a mac pro if this happens. Still battling storage on my mbp and screen real-estate... but it's working.
  • Reply 5 of 68
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,743member
    I was wondering when AI was going to notice this.
  • Reply 6 of 68
    ajayajay Posts: 117member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by backtomac View Post


    There, FTFY.



    My logic: Tornado = Extremely fast "Air"



    But considering the possible (over)heating issues, your argument of Inferno (thighs on fire) is also well justified!

  • Reply 7 of 68
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,743member
    This chip may consume 45 watts. Compare that to the 35 watts for the current model.
  • Reply 8 of 68
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,946member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    Unlike Intel's quad-core server and desktop chips, which essentially feature two dual-core chips "stuck together," the QX9300 is likely to be the first offering from a new Intel mobile architecture that will feature all four processor cores on a single piece of silicon, Eden's previous comments suggest.



    I am pretty sure that is part outdated and part incorrect. All the Penryn based quad core chips are like that now, four cores on a single die.



    I think the iMac is really the only place it can go when it's first launched, maybe what's currently the 2.8GHz model. It's not suitable for the MBPro unless they manage to make a binning that's rated at 35 Watts at a clock that's as quick as the fastest dual core.
  • Reply 9 of 68
    I haven't heard anything about a native-quad core Penryn processor. This is almost certainly going to be based on a MCM.
  • Reply 10 of 68
    backtomacbacktomac Posts: 4,579member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ajay View Post


    My logic: Tornado = Extremely fast "Air"



    But considering the possible (over)heating issues, your argument of Inferno (thighs on fire) is also well justified!





    Joking aside, this is what I'm hoping will make it into the iMac.



    I'm holding out for it.
  • Reply 11 of 68
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by looksthatkill View Post


    get this bad-boy in the iMac then!



    I dont understand why the main article completely ignored the iMac?



    after all {copy}"Apple Inc. the Cupertino, California based Mac maker is well known for its Intel based all in one" {paste}



    assuming there are no obvious restrictions? the iMac doesn't run on batteries and has more room that a laptop for easier/better thermal distribution.



    the high price "should" be well down by macworld 2009 so I'd expect them around then??
  • Reply 12 of 68
    Apple needs to put this is at least one of their computer lines. It would definitely redefine the standards for both the iMacs and the Macbook lines (all three of them). Therefore, Steve should get a hold of those chips regardless of the price!
  • Reply 13 of 68
    kolchakkolchak Posts: 1,398member
    I normally don't participate in the "headless midrange Mac" wishful thinking threads, but if they put this in a slightly larger than Mini case with a couple of 3.5" HD bays and maybe a replaceable PCIe graphics card, I'd buy it.
  • Reply 14 of 68
    I'd certainly love the quiet and tidy power of such a beast
  • Reply 15 of 68
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    1) Have Apple ever put an Extreme version of an Intel processor in any of it's notebooks or consumer desktops? I don't think so.



    2) The heat and battery usage are prohibitive to the current case designs.



    3) The price is prohibitive for the iMac.
  • Reply 16 of 68
    backtomacbacktomac Posts: 4,579member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    1) Have Apple ever put an Extreme version of an Intel processor in any of it's notebooks or consumer desktops? I don't think so.



    Isn't the 2.8 ghz chip in 24" iMac an Extreme version?



    I thought it was.
  • Reply 17 of 68
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by backtomac View Post


    Isn't the 2.8 ghz chip in 24" iMac an Extreme version?



    I thought it was.



    Why yes it is.



    Checking on the price of that chip now...



    edit:

    The current 2.8GHz X9000 with 6MB L2 and 800MHz FSB is $851. The QX9300 is only $189 more. I guess that it is a possible inclusion for the top end iMac. Thanks, Backtomac.
  • Reply 18 of 68
    i386i386 Posts: 91member
    I'll have mine please...



    One with quad cpu, 256Gb SSD, BD drive, 17" big Macbook Pro please with a side order of 4GB of ram.

  • Reply 19 of 68
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,743member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    1) Have Apple ever put an Extreme version of an Intel processor in any of it's notebooks or consumer desktops? I don't think so.



    2) The heat and battery usage are prohibitive to the current case designs.



    3) The price is prohibitive for the iMac.



    I also thought they had an Extreme model in the MBP.
  • Reply 20 of 68
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by melgross View Post


    I also thought they had an Extreme model in the MBP.



    The MBPs have been using the fastest non-Extreme Intel processors.



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