Apple chief Jobs settles health worries

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
In a rare discussion of his personal health, Apple co-founder Steve Jobs has privately revealed to a journalist exactly what conditions led to his overly thin appearance at the Worldwide Developer Conference this year.



After receiving multiple statements from Apple's press relations that simply echoed the company's official position that Jobs' health "is a private matter," the New York Times' Joe Nocera received a personal phone call from Steve Jobs that appears to have settled some of the doubts about his physical condition.



The company luminary insists that the precise details be kept off the record, but according to Nocera has virtually confirmed earlier reporting by the Times' John Markoff that claims Jobs had new surgery earlier this year to address a nutritional problem causing weight loss.



The particular issue is a "good deal more" substantial than the "common bug" Apple spokespeople have used as their most detailed explanation, but is described as far less disastrous than perceived by some shareholders, who triggered a stock sell-off this past week.



The circumstances "weren?t life-threatening and [Jobs] doesn?t have a recurrence of cancer," Nocera says.



Nonetheless, the journalist also questions why it requires a direct yet unspecific intervention from Jobs to settle concerns rather than more official channels. Reiterating the claims both of Markoff and of analysts, Nocera maintains that companies have a responsibility to disclose key executives' illnesses when they will clearly influence the day-to-day operations of the company, even if they believe health is normally something to be kept from the public.



This is seen as especially crucial for an electronics maker like Apple. As much of the company's success in recent years has been attributed to Jobs' direct management of many facets of the business, a sudden resignation or worse would be immediately damaging to share value, even if the company reveals a succession plan.



For Nocera, the notion that Jobs would rather settle a score with a journalist (one who was initially labeled a "slime bucket" making factual errors) than make an official statement to defend his company is baffling. If anything, the writer believes, one would expect Jobs to do what it took to have shareholders hold on to their investments in the company.



"You would think he?d want them to know before me," Nocera says. "But apparently not."
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 78
    virgil-tb2virgil-tb2 Posts: 1,416member
    Nocera is a slime bucket though. You can read his sliminess between every line he wrote.



    He makes out like it's a big mystery why Jobs doesn't want to broadcast the details of his illness to the world and implies that it's irresponsible, when the explanation is much simpler than that. The surgeries in question involve hugely embarrassing questions. It's tantamount to talking about ass surgery.



    How many men want to talk about prostate exams and the exact consistency of their stool relative to their diet, or detail the inner workings of their digestive systems? How about talking about it on the evening news or in the newspaper? It's hardly rocket science why Jobs doesn't want to get into the nitty-gritty details of this.



    Also, how many top execs of Fortune 500 companies have had similar surgeries or digestive complaints? Probably a large proportion given that the majority of them are males in their 40's, 50's and 60's.



    If it's not cancer, and it's not life threatening, then Jobs is right in saying it's basically none of anyone's business but his own IMO.
  • Reply 2 of 78
    asciiascii Posts: 5,941member
    I don't think it's baffling that it's a personal phone call instead of a press release. If Apple regards Steve's health as a personal matter (which they have repeatedly said) then any reports about it would *have* to come from him.
  • Reply 3 of 78
    brendonbrendon Posts: 642member
    I hope for Noceras' sake he verified the source. And if fabricated at least had the presence of mind to have a friend call his phone. A call then would be documented on the date and time he said the conversation occurred just in case a court would like to see that information. If SJ had called me I would have just sit on it just because it is an area that is private personal information. Also if one thing that is reported is incorrect or misunderstood and reported, that could spell big problems for the one doing the reporting. So let's say one of this guys "friends" called from California as a joke and it got reported, both or at least one is bang in trouble.
  • Reply 4 of 78
    foo2foo2 Posts: 1,077member
    Sure, it was "a good deal more" substantial than a "common bug." Otherwise Nocera would have to declare that he had actually been wrong. Jobs had corrective surgery earlier in the year, in order to stem his weight loss. Nocera is implicitly focusing on that surgery in order to maintain his ego.

    However, most likely it was a common bug that created the tipping point, that made Jobs look particularly gaunt and almost caused him to bow out of appearing at WWDC.
  • Reply 5 of 78
    I've heard he is. Anyone have any real facts on that? I hope not. The vegan lifestyle is unnatural. Sorry, that's my opinion. You cannot get the nutritional needs necessary for our bodies from that lifestyle.
  • Reply 6 of 78
    pg4gpg4g Posts: 383member
    He's not a vegan, he's a pescatarian. That is, someone who only eats seafood, right, as well as vegies ???
  • Reply 7 of 78
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 1,819member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    companies have a responsibility to disclose key executives' illnesses when they will clearly influence the day-to-day operations of the company



    Uh, well obviously Steve's health issues didn't affect day-to-day operations now did it!? Just an ass tying to get an answer to a question that was clearly none of his or anyone else's damn business. If Steve was still able to function and Apple is still running as normal, then THERE IS NO ISSUE! Being concerned is one thing. Being a nosey prick is another matter altogether. So, every time someone 'believes' Steve is sick, he's supposed to make an announcement? I don't think so. The stock holders should sue the freaken analysts who dreamed this whole thing up. It's funny how they're never held accountable for screwing with the market.
  • Reply 8 of 78
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 1,819member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mattalex View Post


    I've heard he is. Anyone have any real facts on that? I hope not. The vegan lifestyle is unnatural. Sorry, that's my opinion. You cannot get the nutritional needs necessary for our bodies from that lifestyle.



    You can't!? Such as?



    As far as I know, people can be perfectly healthy as a vegan. In fact it is more unnatural for humans/mammals to consume dairy products after infancy (mother's milk), than it is to live on a vegetarian diet.
  • Reply 9 of 78
    columbuscolumbus Posts: 281member
    OT: I'm not a Vegan, but plenty of Vegans live perfectly healthy lives. If you get things wrong nutritionally then it can lead to health problems, but that applies equally to whatever you eat.



    I think Steve was a Vegan at one stage, however this is no longer the case.
  • Reply 10 of 78
    Apple did the right thing in not commenting on Job's health. If they would have, their would have been no stopping the press in asking everyday for an update on his health. He and Apple

    got tired that the click loving press would not let this story die...so let it be know in several ways that he was OK...indirectly to the press and then directly to this writer.Didn't this writer know

    that Apple investors would find out when he disclosed the conversation?



    And why do articles, including this one, suggest Apple was lying when it said Jobs had a "common bug"...well, from reports I've read, he actually did have the common bug for a week or two before

    the presentation and that likely did not help him in the looking healthy department.



    Apple probably should have disclosed the cancer surgery he had a few years ago earlier, but that was then and this is now. Now let's concentrate on the exploding sales and the problems Apple is having growing their business at such a rapid pace.
  • Reply 11 of 78
    malokatamalokata Posts: 197member
    If it wasn't life-threatening, and didn't affect his long-term capacity to serve, it did not need to be disclosed. Period.
  • Reply 12 of 78
    bigdawgbigdawg Posts: 2member
    No company can give out personal health information without a signed release from that person. Maybe these reporters should learn about the Laws in the US.



    Basic Principle. A major purpose of the Privacy Rule is to define and limit the circumstances in which an individual?s protected heath information may be used or disclosed by covered entities. A covered entity may not use or disclose protected health information, except either: (1) as the Privacy Rule permits or requires; or (2) as the individual who is the subject of the information (or the individual?s personal representative) authorizes in writing.



    Steve has the same rights as any American! That doesn't change just because he is head of a computer company.
  • Reply 13 of 78
    If it wasn't life-threatening, and didn't affect his long-term capacity to serve, it did not need to be disclosed. Period.





    However...... Since the world is all about how things are perceived. And Steve at WWDC look like he was at death's door to me. Someone had some "splainn

    to do Lucy". We all know he is a god. But he would not be if not for the stock holders.
  • Reply 14 of 78
    foo2foo2 Posts: 1,077member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mattalex View Post


    I've heard he is. Anyone have any real facts on that? I hope not. The vegan lifestyle is unnatural. Sorry, that's my opinion. You cannot get the nutritional needs necessary for our bodies from that lifestyle.



    oh, bruder.



    With the mentality of people, I'm really sorry Jobs felt compelled to reveal anything about his health at this time.
  • Reply 15 of 78
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,946member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by BIGDAWG View Post


    No company can give out personal health information without a signed release from that person. Maybe these reporters should learn about the Laws in the US.



    Basic Principle. A major purpose of the Privacy Rule is to define and limit the circumstances in which an individual’s protected heath information may be used or disclosed by covered entities. A covered entity may not use or disclose protected health information, except either: (1) as the Privacy Rule permits or requires; or (2) as the individual who is the subject of the information (or the individual’s personal representative) authorizes in writing.



    Steve has the same rights as any American! That doesn't change just because he is head of a computer company.



    It is apparently (very) slightly different if the individual's contribution in question is a major factor in the value of the stock. There are some SEC regulations regarding notification if the health affects a CEO's ability to serve, but they still get privacy protection in terms of not being allowed to give any clues or details at all about what is wrong and how it's treated without permission. Apparently it's not really enforced much, if at all, but the regulations are there. But clearly, those demanding to know anything about what's going on or even physician physicals are just out of line with regards to the law.
  • Reply 16 of 78
    So its quite possible "Journalists" broke the law? is that what people are saying?



    I wonder what other "Journalists" will take it upon themselves to write frantically about this possible break in the law.. considering the same frantic link bate "Journalism" that went on round the time of the options enquiry..



    My bet is absolutely none.



    anyone agree?
  • Reply 17 of 78
    hosshoss Posts: 69member
    I remember when people used to read the New York Times. Didn't they just report an 82% drop in profit? Next week Joe Nocera will say that Jesus called him. This guy's a desperate print pimp. What a jip!
  • Reply 18 of 78
    lundylundy Posts: 4,466member
    This guy Nocera really is a jerk.



    Sure, I'm happy to hear Steve is not having a recurrence.



    But this issue of the "shareholders" is bullshit. So if he IS having a recurrence, the stock is going to drop anyway when it finally is announced. Announcing it now is his own business and serves no purpose but to let the greedy bastards try and dump their shares before the other guy does. Screw that.



    It wouldn't "help the shareholders." It would only roll the dice so that some of them would have a chance to screw the other ones.



    I want Apple to continue, and Jobs to continue. Whether some greedy asshole makes money by shorting or selling is not something I care about.
  • Reply 19 of 78
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mattalex View Post


    I've heard he is. Anyone have any real facts on that? I hope not. The vegan lifestyle is unnatural. Sorry, that's my opinion. You cannot get the nutritional needs necessary for our bodies from that lifestyle.



    That's not an opinion, that is a [wrong] fact. Either a diet can sustain a person healthily or it can't. And veganism can, so you're wrong. No opinion about it.
  • Reply 20 of 78
    "I remember when people used to read the New York Times. Didn't they just report an 82% drop in profit? Next week Joe Nocera will say that Jesus called him. This guy's a desperate print pimp. What a jip!"



    Does anyone ever expect the truth about anything from the New York Times? I enjoy watching the writhing death throws as they belly-up and flame out. They've left a lot of victims in their wake.
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