OS X 10.3 Wild, unfounded, rampant and dangerous speculation thread in perpetuity

Posted:
in macOS edited January 2014
I wanted to be first out of the gate with this question:



So, what would you like to see in the next OS X version?



It never hurts to start speculatin'!



TING5
«134

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 69
    bartobarto Posts: 2,246member
    Only two things I can think of:



    Gecko, the fast standards-compliant Mozilla rendering engine, becomes a rendering engine for Mac OS X (replacing the current crappy HTML engine).



    That way, there will be 1000s of browers (maybe an official Apple one ), all front-ends to the glorious gecko.



    XML should be be built into the OS too, so glorius office apps can be built for the Mac instead of the current simple text editors.



    Barto
  • Reply 2 of 69
    wcxwcx Posts: 3member
    >So, what would you like to see in the next OS X version?



    I want better installation, UNinstallation, and management. We're at the level of Windows NT 3.5 right now as far as IT-manager-weenie-coolness goes.



    I want the MSI files, the slipstreaming, the Remote Desktop, etc but I don't want it done the MS way.



    (Which is, to hastily build crappy software and fix *half* the problems in the implementation and *none* of the problems in the design, *four versions later*)



    I also want postscript 3 PDF.



    >Gecko, the fast standards-compliant Mozilla rendering engine, becomes a rendering engine for Mac OS X (replacing the current crappy HTML engine).



    I would love it if Apple built a brand new fast standards-compliant rendering engine. I have some major qualms with Gecko's engineering. (Can't please everyone)



    >XML should be be built into the OS too



    How about an XML/XHTML engine instead of an HTML engine?



    While we're on this pipe dream subject (no offense to anyone) I'd love:



    To see an option to turn Aqua stripes off. I like everything else about the Aqua UE.



    To have my choice of filesystem be as transparent to Mac apps as it is to Windows 2000 apps. (even most DOS games can run on NTFS disks)



    To have my metadata back.



    To have the Finder not be the only possible startup shell.



    To have better memory management.



    To have a DirectX shim for OpenGL and the HID Manager.



    (sigh)
  • Reply 3 of 69
    zapchudzapchud Posts: 844member
    "Panther" will have this (I hope)



    REAL OpenGL (2) Control-POWA. As in, a control-panel where you'd actually be able to turn on nice stuff as FSAA, anisotropic filtering and etc.



    Of course, even faster.



    A more customizable aqua look. (hue, saturation, selective colour, phat stuff like in photoshop )



    QuickTime 7



    More snacks to the finder.



    Option for a good, 3-dimensional OpenGL Finder.



    i
  • Reply 4 of 69
    gsxrboygsxrboy Posts: 565member
    [quote]Originally posted by Barto:

    <strong>Only two things I can think of:



    Gecko, the fast standards-compliant Mozilla rendering engine, becomes a rendering engine for Mac OS X (replacing the current crappy HTML engine).





    Barto</strong><hr></blockquote>



    maybe this will help, from macrumors.. browse the log its a fun read



    Googolplex let us know that David Hyatt has been hired by Apple. According to Googolplex:



    David Hyatt has been hired by Apple. David is the creator of Chimera and many parts of Mozilla. He was an employee at Netscape/AOL until Apple offered him a job. To read more about this read his weblogs at <a href="http://mozillazine.org/weblogs/hyatt."; target="_blank">http://mozillazine.org/weblogs/hyatt.</a>;
  • Reply 5 of 69
    How about this...



    A way to switch between users without having to log out and log back in. My wife likes to check email and it's a pain in the neck to have to log out of all of my apps so that she can check it.
  • Reply 6 of 69
    hobbeshobbes Posts: 1,252member
    Handling your files better.

    - True MIME-based metadata.

    - Smart folders, able to be set by rules like smart playlists in iTunes (and, might I add, promised way back in Copland?)





    Open standards everywhere.

    - Gecko integrated into the OS.

    - OpenGL 1.4.

    - Update of PDF up to the 1.4 spec.



    Digital Hub better than ever.

    - Video conferencing added to iChat 2.



    Enhanced functionality.

    - Ability to save user states, as in XP.

    - iSchedule, a delicious front-end to cron.





    An improved Aqua.

    - Enhanced window management (a refined version of miniwindows pulled from Jaguar at the last minute, or something new).

    - Refreshed appearance (minimization/reduction of the stripes).

    - Drag-and-drop spring-loaded folder functionality added to the Dock.



    [ 07-18-2002: Message edited by: Hobbes ]</p>
  • Reply 7 of 69
    kickahakickaha Posts: 8,760member
    [quote]Originally posted by Hobbes:

    <strong>Handling your files better.

    - True MIME-based metadata.

    - Smart folders, able to be set by rules like smart playlists in iTunes (and, might I add, promised way back in Copland?)

    </strong><hr></blockquote>



    Check out the following <a href="http://www.cs.unc.edu/~smithja/PBPrefs.tiff"; target="_blank">Project Builder Prefs</a> image... looks an awful lot like BeFS's MIME based metadata, doesn't it? Considering that Apple hired the creator of BeFS, I suspect this is a testbed for the ideas, to get developer feedback.



    Also, the Find in the 10.2 Finder seems to be what you're asking for, except for the save-for-later feature... which wouldn't be *that* hard.



    [quote]<strong>

    Open standards everywhere.

    - Gecko integrated into the OS.

    - OpenGL 1.4.

    - Update of PDF up to the 1.4 spec.

    </strong><hr></blockquote>



    No, yes, yes.



    At least, 'no', if you mean real integration, ala WinXP, where the browser code is given a special 'in the kernel' place for speed. Bad idea. But providing it as a library for developers to use? I'm almost convinced on that one.



    [quote]<strong>Digital Hub better than ever.

    - Video conferencing added to iChat 2.



    Enhanced functionality.

    - Ability to save user states, as in XP.

    - iSchedule, a delicious front-end to cron.





    An improved Aqua.

    - Enhanced window management (a refined version of miniwindows pulled from Jaguar at the last minute, or something new).

    - Refreshed appearance (minimization/reduction of the stripes).

    - Drag-and-drop spring-loaded folder functionality added to the Dock.

    </strong><hr></blockquote>



    I'm not sure we won't see that last one - I'll be disappointed if it isn't there... it's so simple, now that SLFs are in the Finder.
  • Reply 8 of 69
    [quote]

    XML should be be built into the OS too, so glorius office apps can be built for the Mac instead of the current simple text editors.



    Barto[/QB]<hr></blockquote>



    XML is already built into Mac OS X. It has been there since the very first developer previews. All the preference files in OS X are in XML.



    XML is just a markup language. It is just a generic way of creating a tagged file for easy of parsing.



    Now rich text is already supported by OS X, easy for developers to use, when using Cocoa. XHTML is a seperate issue, and hopefully more browsers will support it completely. we'll see.



    What I want to see in OS X is more compatability between Obj C and C++... It's really just a compiler issue, and Apple making strides at getting them more alligned, but it would be nice if you had full iteroperability between the two.
  • Reply 9 of 69
    meijinmeijin Posts: 5member
    Unless I missed it and this is already in Jaguar, I'd like to see virtual desktops. I really liked them when I had my brief run-in with linux.
  • Reply 10 of 69
    Ahh yes... Virtual Desktops... That would be very nice.
  • Reply 11 of 69
    hobbeshobbes Posts: 1,252member
    [quote]Originally posted by Hobbes:

    Handling your files better.

    - True MIME-based metadata.

    - Smart folders, able to be set by rules like smart playlists in iTunes (and, might I add, promised way back in Copland?)



    Check out the following Project Builder Prefs image... looks an awful lot like BeFS's MIME based metadata, doesn't it? Considering that Apple hired the creator of BeFS, I suspect this is a testbed for the ideas, to get developer feedback.



    Also, the Find in the 10.2 Finder seems to be what you're asking for, except for the save-for-later feature... which wouldn't be *that* hard.<hr></blockquote>



    Yep, I'm basing that hope on Dominic and the PB Prefs.



    As for Smart Folders... the return of Find in the Jaguar Finder is very nice, and much welcomed, but a Smart Folder would be different.



    Like the Smart Playlist in iTunes, it would always be on, actively checking the file system database and updating itself depending on what rules are set for that folder.



    Inside the folder would be real files, like the results of a Find search, with a Refresh button (if you're faster than the database checking algorithm, perhaps).



    Why is this different from using Find?



    - It's much more inititive, for one. Make a folder, set the rules, click or double-click at any time check.



    - Once created, it's always on. You don't have do a Find search 14 times a day. You just go to your Smart Folder.



    - It opens up a new way of thinking about your files. You could create a Smart Folder that has everything you've worked on the past day. Or above a certain file size. Or haven't not been modified for a certain amount of time. This plus any new metadata that's introduced with the new fs could be very interesting.



    Saving a set of Find rules from Find as an option would be a good start. But, imo, not quite the same.





    [quote]

    Open standards everywhere.

    - Gecko integrated into the OS.

    - OpenGL 1.4.

    - Update of PDF up to the 1.4 spec.



    No, yes, yes.



    At least, 'no', if you mean real integration, ala WinXP, where the browser code is given a special 'in the kernel' place for speed. Bad idea. But providing it as a library for developers to use? I'm almost convinced on that one.

    <hr></blockquote>



    I did mean the latter. Should have been more careful with "integrated". More like "included".



    I would also not at all be surprised if Apple introduces its own browser with in the next two years, based on Chimera.



    [edit: tweaked Smart Folders concept.]



    [ 07-18-2002: Message edited by: Hobbes ]</p>
  • Reply 12 of 69
    pendrakependrake Posts: 44member
    The theme of the next version is broadband rules!



    1. Database driven/based file system (similar to BeOS) so that all apps, etc can do intelligent, speedy searches on keywords/attributes associated to files.



    2. Videoconferencing/Internet Telephony app. (why not?)



    3. iServer - think of your own personal .mac service, running on your broadband connected Mac. Your own mailserver (no mail limit), your own web server, your own file server, your own calendar server, your own personal agent/scheduler, all in one. Accessible from anywhere, with a browser, on any platform. Access your personal data and publish your public data to the world. With dynamic, easy to use front ends for things like blogs, discussion groups, etc.



    4. Themes.



    5. Take the background image flipper to the next level, the ability to run a quicktime loop (MP4) as a background image. Waterfalls, fishtanks, fireplaces.



    6. Fire-like integration to iChat - support messenger, ICQ, Yahoo and other popular messenger services.



    7. Firewire 2.0 and USB 2.0 support (may come in a dot release?).



    8. Home automation with Rendevous and third party devices. Includes remote control over Internet for home security and video surveillance. Uses Bluetooth, 802.11, etc.



    9. .mac enhancements - discounts, etc, for .mac members to online services such as Amazon, eBay, etc. Preferential treatment for being part of an elite online community.



    10. Multiple user support - similar to XP, the ability to easily swap between users and pick up right where you left off.



    11. Instant-on support. Or at least trimming bootup times down significantly.



    12. Included Chess game upgraded to use iChat/Rendevous to find partners to play with online, including ranking scheme/ladder. Also add Go.



    13. PVR functionality.



    14. QT Server builtin for remote access via TV (wireless unit, 3rd party) or iTunes/MP3 player remote to access your own music library over the Internet.



    15. Built in clustering support - to allow offices and applications to share excess computing resources. Maya announces support.



    16. iGame. Open, standards based game creation platform (v1.0) that allows people to use 3d and 2d engines to create a variety of games. Think NeverWinter Nights builder kits plus Quake III mods plus Civ3 mods. Steve says - we didn't want to be left behind on the whole personalized game creation industry - so we built a personal creation platform anyone can use. Includes Internet support for online gaming. It seems that games are getting bigger than books or movies or video - we want to lead the way!



    17. iMoney. Tired of Quicken's poor Mac support, and bolstered by the fact that all the banks/etc have standard interfaces, Apple releases their own personal finance program.



    That's a good start. Only 133 new features to go to compare to Jaguar...



    :-)
  • Reply 13 of 69
    buonrottobuonrotto Posts: 6,368member
    I really love the idea of smart folders, and I think the current folder setup could use this idea: the pictures folder can keep tabs on any image file anywhere in the user's folder or in the system, same with the music, movies, favorites, and sites folders, etc. It is the next step in using indexing in the filesystem. This is a metadata-driven idea too.



    I think the Dock could be revised more heavily too. More options to organize it, spring-loaded functionality (i.e.e, extended drag-n-drop), more options with mini-windows.
  • Reply 14 of 69
    [quote]Originally posted by Pendrake:

    <strong>

    1. Database driven/based file system (similar to BeOS) so that all apps, etc can do intelligent, speedy searches on keywords/attributes associated to files.



    4. Themes.



    5. Take the background image flipper to the next level, the ability to run a quicktime loop (MP4) as a background image. Waterfalls, fishtanks, fireplaces.

    </strong><hr></blockquote>



    A new File System....hmmm. do I have to reformat to upgrade my OS, OMG! Apple's going to be raked over the coals!!!



    Themes, Oh cool! Actually would be nice. Steve has to have *complete* control so I doubt it



    Movies in the background. We might never get anything done. How about iTunes visualizations for an "active background"
  • Reply 15 of 69
    I'm surprised that no one mentioned built-in OS level encrypting of files, folders, and various other directory structures, including whole disks.



    I'd also like to see some way to "hide" folders and files from view without switching between users. I'm not talking about high level security here, just a way to keep stuff you want to be private from the casual observer without having to set up a "guest" account. I would like this feature to be incorporated into a contextual menu if you click on a file or folder, you can perform a variety of tasks from "hiding" it to encrypting it. Plus the encryption should be fairly high-level at least 128-bit or so.



    I second the call for iChat to include voice and video streaming capabilities. Us Mac OS X users are lagging behind windows users on this front. Not good. Personally I hope something happens on this front before the next major OS upgrade.
  • Reply 16 of 69
    Oh, and one more thing.



    When we get fully native hardware support for scanners (even perhaps through Apple), and the last few straggling OS 9 apps that require booting into 9 for hardware access (ie. read sound editing apps), then I think it's time to loose OS 9 completely, and just have a "Classic" shell, that runs inside of OS X but you can't boot into it.



    Right now OS 9 is a HUGE security hole for pretty much all Macs currently in production. All someone has to do to get access to pretty much any file in your system is use an OS 9 boot CD and they can trash, copy, move files to their hearts content. Hopefully soon, in the next 6 to 9 months Apple will be making hardware that no longer boots 9, and just has the "Classic" shell within it. When that happens, we're going to have to know how to settle weird file permission conflicts from within OS X, but hopefully by then we'll have an easy way to resolve the "you don't have permission to delete that file" without having to resort to the terminal! I'm not talking about where you have to download something from versiontracker, I'm talking about a solution for "the rest of us" the average consumer who doesn't know versiontracker exists let alone that it has programs to fix quirks in OS X.
  • Reply 17 of 69
    [quote]Right now OS 9 is a HUGE security hole for pretty much all Macs currently in production. All someone has to do to get access to pretty much any file in your system is use an OS 9 boot CD and they can trash, copy, move files to their hearts content<hr></blockquote>



    not if one uses the open firmware password utility that apple released a long time ago. with this, should you try to hold down the option key during startup, you dont see a list of boot disks, you see a lock and a password field.
  • Reply 18 of 69
    sc_marktsc_markt Posts: 1,393member
    "So, what would you like to see in the next OS X version?"



    I'd like a menubar built into OS X 10.3 at the bottom of the screen and setup so that icons of open apps are displayed in it and clicking once or twice on them brings up that app or brings up that app and hides all others. In addition, it should be set up so that a portion of it is reserved for 3rd party status indicators. I have read that OS X 10.2 does not allow 3rd party status indicators or applets in the top menubar anymore.



    An alternative to this is to have an option in the dock to lock it to the bottom of the screen, all the way across from side to side and such that it re-adjusts the desktop picture so that the bottom of it is lined up to the top edge of the dock. And it should also re-align the desktop icons so that they don't get covered by the dock. This way, it would behave like a bottom menubar but would in fact, be the dock and retain all of its cool and useful functionality. And it would be nice if you could first set the size of it before you lock it to the bottom.



    I would also like the look of OS X to be less candy-ish. Or, I wish Apple would offer a version of OS X for technical people (scientists, engineers, technicans, mathmaticians, etc) that didn't have the candy look but looked more like a high-tech OS for science and engineer use but that kept the ease of use of it. They could market it differently and maybe bundle some tech apps with it instead of the graphic apps that come with OS X.
  • Reply 19 of 69
    stepsonstepson Posts: 95member
    [quote] Included Chess game upgraded to use iChat/Rendevous to find partners to play with online, including ranking scheme/ladder. Also add Go. <hr></blockquote>



    Wow that is a cool idea! I mean, sure warcraft 3 and all those new mutli-player games do have a 'LAN' setting, but if games that ran on OSX could just use rendesvous, that would be pretty neat, and probably easier for developers. I think OSX needs more games personally, I like chess, but I rarely like to play it (in fact, i've never played OSX chess, just ran it when i got the public beta i think and said 'Wow, chess' and closed it).



    Also with this Smart-Folders idea ... can't you achieve the same basic thing today with Applescript attached to a folder, or does OSX no longer let you do that?
  • Reply 20 of 69
    [quote]Originally posted by ThunderPoit:

    <strong>



    not if one uses the open firmware password utility that apple released a long time ago. with this, should you try to hold down the option key during startup, you dont see a list of boot disks, you see a lock and a password field.</strong><hr></blockquote>



    True, and I was aware of this, but I'd gather that most end users are not. It's not set up this way by default, and there's no obvious way to access this when you setup your computer, so unless Apple includes an option to set this up while you're configuring a system install, then it effectively doesn't exist for the majority of users.



    Therefore this is still a real problem.
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