Apple authorizes MMS on the iPhone, but not for US users

1235

Comments

  • Reply 81 of 110
    tenobelltenobell Posts: 7,014member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Murphster View Post


    Okay a few things to clear up...

    * The person who claimed that more emails are sent than text messages is speaking from a US view only. I would bet you plenty that in many countries in the world more SMS's are sent that emails. In the UK everybody text's each other, I even used to text clients instead of sending an email. In is actually much better at delivering a message to somebody when you want to read quickly.



    This person was me. You have to understand that primarily only mobile phones make use of SMS/MMS. While their are far more electronic devices and machines that use email. Email is also far more versatile in its use than SMS/MMS.



    The last reports I've seen is their are about 5.4 billion SMS messages sent daily and around 60 billion email messages sent daily.



    Quote:

    * SMS is one of the greatest technologies ever devised. You know how I know that? Because it is a technology that was never thought of by the mobile operators. It is an accidental service that is credited as saving the ass of mobile operators in Europe in the late 90's. All SMS originally was designed for was for service messages from the network. Somebody thought it might be a fun thing to offer to customers and all of a sudden it turned into the biggest revenue earner for the operators there was. People in many countries spend much more on texts than they do on voice calls.



    I can only see the mobile carriers thinking this is a great development. I cannot see how its so great for the consumers.



    Quote:

    The only reason why the US never turned out to be text happy like Europe was because for years it was impossible to send texts to other networks in the US. The US was very backward in rolling out mobile phone technology whereas by 1999 everybody in the UK for had a mobile phone and many of them were sending 100's of texts a day.



    This is partially a reason. But at the same time the Black Berry provided a great way to email from the phone, so emailing from the phone became apart of our mobile culture.



    Quote:

    Every phone I have owned since 1992 has had an email client, there was just never any point using it as SMS was already there and was a much better option. I know it is hard to believe but SMS is still a better way of sending a text message to someone that email, some things just cannot be improved.



    The only advantage SMS has is the ability to have a threaded conversation. While email is more like sending a letter than an informal conversation. Other wise email is better in everyway with its flexibility in the type of content you can send and receive.
  • Reply 82 of 110
    jfanningjfanning Posts: 3,390member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Enigmafan420 View Post


    Excuse me-who is the clueless one? Last I checked we were talking about AT$T, not anything in NZ (Great country though, Uncle lives there).



    Actually, if you read the article, we are talking about Sweden
  • Reply 83 of 110
    Until MMS comes to the iPhone in the UK, I'm sticking with my trusty rusty Sony Ericsson phone.



    (that and Bluetooth data transfer!)



  • Reply 84 of 110
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post


    [CENTER]P.S. Due to the great response, it appears that a lot of stuff posted on the iPhone is by guys that don't or never had one. But still profess to be experts on the business models[/CENTER]Lots of misinformation being posted.



    Let's put things into perspective:



    Here is my current Rogers (Canada) bill.



    Price of 3G 8G iPhone $199CND $153.37US



    Service:.......................................... .....$CND.............................Description

    Voice .............................................. $27 .................. ........300 minutes family plan (3 cell phones)

    .................................................. ..... ....................free weekend and evening starting at 6PM

    Data Usage Plan 6Gbs.......................$30 ...................(monthly average use last 3 months = 140 MBs)

    3G Visual Voicemail Value Pack ........$11...................(1st month free) Visual Voicemail, Call Display,

    .................................................. ..... ....................WhoCalled™ & 2,500 Sent Text Messages (incoming are free)

    System Access Fee ...........................$6.95

    Total .............................................$74.9 5CDN $57.76US

    So what are you paying?


    Now that we have had time to get actual costs, it would be interesting to see what the rest of the world is really charging.



    Would be interested in what Sweden charges. Anybody translate? http://www.telia.se/privat/produkter...is_privat.page







    And for those who continue to display animosity towards Rogers, they don't charge for incoming text messages like AT&T or most of the rest of the world. As such, for most of us, we don't have to incur an additional service charge for something most of us don't really want.



    Remember, if your provider does charge for any incoming text messages, you pay or it is added to your account whether or not you accept or even open them.



    I never heard a good word about Rodgers, but they are looking better and better all the time.



    PS: your formatting above is horrible.





    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jowie74 View Post


    Until MMS comes to the iPhone in the UK, I'm sticking with my trusty rusty Sony Ericsson phone.



    (that and Bluetooth data transfer!)



    image: http://www.mikesquarter.com/wp-conte...ne3g-stone.jpg



    LOL I do like that pic.



    PS: I was able to type this on my iPhone. O' Happy Day!
  • Reply 85 of 110
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    I never heard a good word about Rodgers, but they are looking better and better all the time.



    From what I can see most of the dissidents here are talking through their head. Professing 'facts' from hearsay or just being asses.



    What we have found when we attempt to get the real numbers, there is virtually no response. It would appear that there are no real users, i.e., they don't use the service they are dissing. As such, they can't support there claims. Worse are those dissenters who don't have an iPhone or any cell phone at all but continually trash the product or the services.



    Rogers is not much different than like-services worldwide. Canada has a problem being so large in size yet so mall in population. We don't get the bulk unit prices that are enjoyed by bigger countries. And for years, our dollar has sucked, and worse, most of the components to build our cellular infrastructure is imported.



    A good analogy would be if we used tin cans to communicate, our string would need to be nearly 2 feet long, whereas yours, just over an inch. It not the string or the cans, but the costs to keep the strings taught between the cans that creates the difference.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    PS: your formatting above is horrible.



    Just the facts man. Just the facts
  • Reply 86 of 110
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mjtomlin View Post


    So as I stated in my last post... If this 3rd party developer and mobile provider in Sweden can offer up MMS without needing Apple's assistance (only blessing), why hasn't AT&T in the US?



    I'm thinking that foobar was right in his explanation of how MMS is working, that the phone company is basically setting up a gateway that will intercept MMS messages bound for iPhones and redirect them to this application, and likewise the iPhone app will direct messages to the same gateway that will then pass them on to their destination. No doubt this is an additional cost for the telco, maybe a cost that AT&T is unwilling to pay (in addition to the cost of developing the app in the first place).



    Quote:

    Another point... Isn't phone tethering another lucrative option? Why doesn't AT&T offer that? Is Apple standing in the way of that as well? It's AT&Ts end user agreement that forbids tethering.



    So the argument of revenue stream doesn't hold up, because AT&T could stand to make a lot more money off of iPhone tethering plans.



    Maybe AT&T was concerned about how much bandwidth iPhones would be eating up and wanted to ensure it wouldn't send their network into the crapper before allowing it. AT&T has stated that tethering is coming, so maybe they now feel confident their network can withstand any added traffic tethering will generate.
  • Reply 87 of 110
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jowie74 View Post


    Until MMS comes to the iPhone in the UK, I'm sticking with my trusty rusty Sony Ericsson phone.



    (that and Bluetooth data transfer!)







    ROFLMAO



    I disagree that the 3G is only slightly more useful than a rock-but that is truly funny.
  • Reply 88 of 110
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jfanning View Post


    Actually, if you read the article, we are talking about Sweden



    I never was-and it was pretty clear that I wasn't
  • Reply 89 of 110
    jfanningjfanning Posts: 3,390member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Enigmafan420 View Post


    I never was-and it was pretty clear that I wasn't



    So it's not ok for someone else to change topic, but it is for you?
  • Reply 90 of 110
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jfanning View Post


    So it's not ok for someone else to change topic, but it is for you?



    Yep that is what I said...



    Whatever
  • Reply 91 of 110
    adjeiadjei Posts: 738member
    Glad to see all those no MMS nonsense will be behind us.
  • Reply 92 of 110
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bloggerblog View Post


    Again, many other AT&T phones support tethering without an extra fee. The iPhone was singled out.



    But AT&T only offers a few plans which permit tethering. They start at $60 per month minimum (as opposed to the iPhone's $30 per month data plan) and they are all capped at 5 GB per month (as opposed to the iPhone's unlimited).



    If you tether on one of those other AT&T phones which supports it, but you haven't signed up for one of AT&T's $60+ data plans which permit tethering, then you're violating AT&T's terms of service and if AT&T finds out about it you can be penalized heavily.



    Under the terms of AT&T's exclusivity agreement with Apple, the iPhone can't use any of those $60+ data plans. Rather, it must use the iPhone's special data plan.



    The iPhone's data plan is quite a bit cheaper than any of AT&T's plans which permit tethering, and it theoretically permits a larger yield of data than you could get with those more expensive plans. AT&T is willing to permit a larger cap on data for a lower price, specifically because they know that the vast majority of customers will never actually use very much data under normal conditions. There's only so much data that you can manage to download on a small scale device like an iPhone compared to a full fledged computer.



    Effectively, AT&T is intentionally overselling its data capacity to its iPhone customers based on the assumption that most people won't be using the bandwidth they've paid for all the time -- the average demand they actually have to serve at any one instant will be relatively small and manageable.



    If they permitted tethering, then there would be a huge potential for people to use significantly more data. Suddenly, the very same overselling techniques which look so lucrative when the expected demand is low, start to be a drain on revenues when demand for service is higher.
  • Reply 93 of 110
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by lfmorrison View Post


    But AT&T only offers a few plans which permit tethering. They start at $60 per month minimum (as opposed to the iPhone's $30 per month data plan) and they are all capped at 5 GB per month (as opposed to the iPhone's unlimited).



    If you tether on one of those other AT&T phones which supports it, but you haven't signed up for one of AT&T's $60+ data plans which permit tethering, then you're violating AT&T's terms of service and if AT&T finds out about it you can be penalized heavily.



    Under the terms of AT&T's exclusivity agreement with Apple, the iPhone can't use any of those $60+ data plans. Rather, it must use the iPhone's special data plan.



    The iPhone's data plan is quite a bit cheaper than any of AT&T's plans which permit tethering, and it theoretically permits a larger yield of data than you could get with those more expensive plans. AT&T is willing to permit a larger cap on data for a lower price, specifically because they know that the vast majority of customers will never actually use very much data under normal conditions. There's only so much data that you can manage to download on a small scale device like an iPhone compared to a full fledged computer.



    Effectively, AT&T is intentionally overselling its data capacity to its iPhone customers based on the assumption that most people won't be using the bandwidth they've paid for all the time -- the average demand they actually have to serve at any one instant will be relatively small and manageable.



    If they permitted tethering, then there would be a huge potential for people to use significantly more data. Suddenly, the very same overselling techniques which look so lucrative when the expected demand is low, start to be a drain on revenues when demand for service is higher.



    I went to a main AT&T store and I was told, that other phones are better than than the iPhone in that with the same data plan I could get tethering, and that the 5GB is a soft cap, which means if I reach it I'll still be able to use the internet and wont be charged extra. Moreover, If I got their Mobile TV+ (sometimes called 3G+) plan which is $60 and not compatible with the iPhone, I'll be able to view live TV and get much faster Internet WITH tethering.
  • Reply 94 of 110
    tenobelltenobell Posts: 7,014member
    There is no technical limitation with the iPhone for why it does not offer these features. These limitation are only business choices. AT&T is nervous about tethering on the iPhone because the iPhone by itself uses over twice the amount of data of every other AT&T phone combined.



    Who really wants to pay AT&T another $60 to watch television. You really don't see that as an absolute waste of money?



    AT&T Mobile TV plan does not give you faster internet. The speed of the internet rendering is determined more by the phone.







    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bloggerblog View Post


    I went to a main AT&T store and I was told, that other phones are better than than the iPhone in that with the same data plan I could get tethering, and that the 5GB is a soft cap, which means if I reach it I'll still be able to use the internet and wont be charged extra. Moreover, If I got their Mobile TV+ (sometimes called 3G+) plan which is $60 and not compatible with the iPhone, I'll be able to view live TV and get much faster Internet WITH tethering.



  • Reply 95 of 110
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post


    Would be interested in what Sweden charges. Anybody translate? http://www.telia.se/privat/produkter...is_privat.page



    OK. I'm a Finn (means had mandatory swedish language studies at school) so I'll take a stab at it. Your quote is for an iPhone deal, which is not necessarily that representative of how things work here in the Nordics. A large part of people buy an unsubsidised (and unlocked) phone and select their service based on whatever they need. But here's the iPhone one you were interested in:
    • Monthly fee: 69kr (about 8 USD)

    • Call start fee: 0.69kr (about 0.08USD)

    • SMS: 0.69kr/SMS

    • Call within telia: 0kr. To other operators 0.69kr/min.

    • Data: 199Kr/month (about 23.50 USD/mo)

    • Total/mo: 268kr/month (about 31USD/mo)

    • iPhone 3G 8GB: 3795kr for 18mo (about 440 USD)

    For another comparison my own deal (in Finland, wihtouth iPhone) is as follows:



    Voice:
    • Monthly fee: 0.699 EUR/month (about 0.8USD)

    • SMS: 0.069 EUR/SMS

    • Voice: 0.069 EUR/minute except free to 5 personally defined numbers

    Other packages exist with higher monthly fees, but give free varying voice minutes and free SMS.



    I just noticed, that they've opened a new subscription type, where the montly fee has been reduced by 0.02 EUR and SMS/MMS/VOICE by 0.002. Wonder if I'd bother changing... We'll it's easily done via the web, might as well.



    Data:
    • Monthly fee: 9,80 EUR/month (about 12 USD)

    • Bitrate: capped at 384kbps

    • Volume: unlimited (yes, really ulimited)

    • Included: second SIM card + USB modem

    For higher bitrates:

    512kbps=14.80 EUR/mo

    1 Mbps = 19.80 EUR/mo

    2 Mbps = 29,80 EUR/mo

    5 Mbps = 34.90 EUR/mo



    And the voice and data subscriptions are not dependent on one another and can be changed at will to whatever suits your needs. Or you can buy a subscription with voice and data combined as well. As you can see, the answer (and price) depends on your own needs and selected subscriptions.



    Regs, Jarkko
  • Reply 96 of 110
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jahonen View Post


    OK. I'm a Finn (means had mandatory swedish language studies at school) so I'll take a stab at it. Your quote is for an iPhone deal, which is not necessarily that representative of how things work here in the Nordics. A large part of people buy an unsubsidised (and unlocked) phone and select their service based on whatever they need. But here's the iPhone one you were interested in:
    • Monthly fee: 69kr (about 8 USD)

    • Call start fee: 0.69kr (about 0.08USD)

    • SMS: 0.69kr/SMS

    • Call within telia: 0kr. To other operators 0.69kr/min.

    • Data: 199Kr/month (about 23.50 USD/mo)

    • Total/mo: 268kr/month (about 31USD/mo)

    • iPhone 3G 8GB: 3795kr for 18mo (about 440 USD)

    For another comparison my own deal (in Finland, wihtouth iPhone) is as follows:



    Voice:
    • Monthly fee: 0.699 EUR/month (about 0.8USD)

    • SMS: 0.069 EUR/SMS

    • Voice: 0.069 EUR/minute except free to 5 personally defined numbers

    Other packages exist with higher monthly fees, but give free varying voice minutes and free SMS.



    I just noticed, that they've opened a new subscription type, where the montly fee has been reduced by 0.02 EUR and SMS/MMS/VOICE by 0.002. Wonder if I'd bother changing... We'll it's easily done via the web, might as well.



    Data:
    • Monthly fee: 9,80 EUR/month (about 12 USD)

    • Bitrate: capped at 384kbps

    • Volume: unlimited (yes, really ulimited)

    • Included: second SIM card + USB modem

    For higher bitrates:

    512kbps=14.80 EUR/mo

    1 Mbps = 19.80 EUR/mo

    2 Mbps = 29,80 EUR/mo

    5 Mbps = 34.90 EUR/mo



    And the voice and data subscriptions are not dependent on one another and can be changed at will to whatever suits your needs. Or you can buy a subscription with voice and data combined as well. As you can see, the answer (and price) depends on your own needs and selected subscriptions.



    Regs, Jarkko



    Thank you Jarkko.



    Right now I am getting 2048 Kbps on 3G, 6875 home Wi-Fi and 153 via Edge



    Can't complain for $57US a month.
  • Reply 97 of 110
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jahonen View Post


    OK. I'm a Finn (means had mandatory swedish language studies at school) so I'll take a stab at it. Your quote is for an iPhone deal, which is not necessarily that representative of how things work here in the Nordics. A large part of people buy an unsubsidised (and unlocked) phone and select their service based on whatever they need. But here's the iPhone one you were interested in:
    • Monthly fee: 69kr (about 8 USD)

    • Call start fee: 0.69kr (about 0.08USD)

    • SMS: 0.69kr/SMS

    • Call within telia: 0kr. To other operators 0.69kr/min.

    • Data: 199Kr/month (about 23.50 USD/mo)

    • Total/mo: 268kr/month (about 31USD/mo)

    • iPhone 3G 8GB: 3795kr for 18mo (about 440 USD)

    For another comparison my own deal (in Finland, wihtouth iPhone) is as follows:



    Voice:
    • Monthly fee: 0.699 EUR/month (about 0.8USD)

    • SMS: 0.069 EUR/SMS

    • Voice: 0.069 EUR/minute except free to 5 personally defined numbers

    Other packages exist with higher monthly fees, but give free varying voice minutes and free SMS.



    I just noticed, that they've opened a new subscription type, where the montly fee has been reduced by 0.02 EUR and SMS/MMS/VOICE by 0.002. Wonder if I'd bother changing... We'll it's easily done via the web, might as well.



    Data:
    • Monthly fee: 9,80 EUR/month (about 12 USD)

    • Bitrate: capped at 384kbps

    • Volume: unlimited (yes, really ulimited)

    • Included: second SIM card + USB modem

    For higher bitrates:

    512kbps=14.80 EUR/mo

    1 Mbps = 19.80 EUR/mo

    2 Mbps = 29,80 EUR/mo

    5 Mbps = 34.90 EUR/mo



    And the voice and data subscriptions are not dependent on one another and can be changed at will to whatever suits your needs. Or you can buy a subscription with voice and data combined as well. As you can see, the answer (and price) depends on your own needs and selected subscriptions.



    Regs, Jarkko



    Moi Jarrko,



    Are you talking about Sonera rates, DNA or Elisa? Rumor has it that Sonera is scrambling to rework their contract with Apple due to the high number of pre-cancellations they have received by iPhone owners.
  • Reply 98 of 110
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by genericposts View Post


    Moi Jarrko,



    Are you talking about Sonera rates, DNA or Elisa? Rumor has it that Sonera is scrambling to rework their contract with Apple due to the high number of pre-cancellations they have received by iPhone owners.



    Please confirm with reference source.
  • Reply 99 of 110
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post


    Please confirm with reference source.



    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/rumor



    Do you understand the concept behind how a rumor works? Someone that might have more info than you will tell you something off the record so as their name is not associated with said rumor. You are free to use the info but not to reference the persons name or any other pertinent info that could link the source back to the information, thus protecting the source. Do you understand now?



    Obviously I have mistakenly given you the impression that I care if you believe what I say or not. Please forgive me. I could honestly not care less if you believe what I say or not. You affect my life less than zero percent, and well I do not hold you in any sort of regard. Soooo, if you want to believe then do so, if not, that is also your choice, and considering you were not originally addressed in the first place I do not have to answer anything you put forth.



    No need to thank me for helping you out with this. All in a days work.
  • Reply 100 of 110
    adjeiadjei Posts: 738member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Abster2core View Post


    Please confirm with reference source.



    He doesn't like Apple, I would take everything he says with a grain of salt.
Sign In or Register to comment.