OMG! The Windows 7 taskbar becomes an OS X dock.

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
I'm not joking, you can now (and I'm aware some people here likely know about this) dock your most frequently used apps in the taskbar, when you drag them is the animation is "chillingly" similar to OS X. You can then right click in the dock just like OS X. Clearly stolen from OS X.



It really astounds me how little taste and creative originality they have up in Redmond. I'm not saying this as an Apple fanboy, but as a regular Joe. These guys are ridiculous.



They even chose a number for the name of the OS, what other company uses a numbers to name their OS?
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 56
    imickimick Posts: 351member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ireland View Post


    what other company uses a numbers to name there OS?



    I don't know of any. I know that Apple uses letters.

    I suspect the next Apple OS will be call OS Y.
  • Reply 2 of 56
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,341member
    LOL



    It pretty much is the Dock and Jumplists are a lot like

    Stacks with rules (last 10 files or so)



    The see through windows feature to the desktop is worse to me than

    Expose's "pushing windows off the screen" feature. It allows me to view the

    desktop and it's not mouse dependent so I can choose an item and then return the

    windows.



    Windows 7 is going to be hyped like "oooooo what is Apple going to do?"



    But frankly I've got everything I need already in OS X right now.
  • Reply 3 of 56
    guinnessguinness Posts: 473member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by iMick View Post


    I don't know of any. I know that Apple uses letters.

    I suspect the next Apple OS will be call OS Y.



    So what was Mac OS then?
  • Reply 4 of 56
    I believe they combined the QuickLaunch (available since Windows 95) into the new taskbar so that the items

    act as a launcher and windows switching. They had something similar from Windows 1.0.



    The behaviors of the new Taskbar is different from that of the Dock. Please correct me if I am wrong, but the Dock is used to manage

    applications with Expose used for managing windows. Whereas, the new Taskbar in Windows 7 is still used to launch applications

    and manage windows. One thing noticeable is the absence of text, but this can be easily added back from its option. Supposedly, the larger icons are for multi-touch.



    Actually, Microsoft used to name its line of Windows with numbers: Windows 1.0, Windows 2.0, Windows 3.0, Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows 2000

    but they changed to Windows XP then Vista. They have since reverted to numbering system with a new Chief Software Architect, Ray Ozzie. He

    led the development of Office 2007 and now leads the development of Windows 7.



  • Reply 5 of 56
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by KevinN206 View Post


    I believe they combined the QuickLaunch (available since Windows 95) into the new taskbar so that the items

    act as a launcher and windows switching. They had something similar from Windows 1.0.



    The behaviors of the new Taskbar is different from that of the Dock. Please correct me if I am wrong, but the Dock is used to manage

    applications with Expose used for managing windows. Whereas, the new Taskbar in Windows 7 is still used to launch applications

    and manage windows. One thing noticeable is the absence of text, but this can be easily added back from its option. Supposedly, the larger icons are for multi-touch.



    Actually, Microsoft used to name its line of Windows with numbers: Windows 1.0, Windows 2.0, Windows 3.0, Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows 2000

    but they changed to Windows XP then Vista. They have since reverted to numbering system with a new Chief Software Architect, Ray Ozzie. He

    led the development of Office 2007 and now leads the development of Windows 7.







    Well, the Windows NT line started over with a new numbering scheme (although it started with NT 3.1 because it was released concurrently with the DOS-based Windows 3.1). NT used the kernel number as its name through version 4, then what was supposed to be NT 5.0 was called Win 2000 instead. Marketing. Windows XP was actually Windows NT 5.1, Windows Server 2003 was actually Windows NT 5.2, and so on. Vista was NT 6. Amusingly, Windows 7 is actually NT 6.1, but marketing is still in charge of the names and "Seven" is easier to say.
  • Reply 6 of 56
    groveratgroverat Posts: 10,872member
    Quote:

    what other company uses a numbers to name there OS?



    By this time your post went from asinine to complete self-parody.



    The Win7 taskbar is not a dock rip-off. The dock wasn't even original in its own right. Accusations of theft are for the weak in this regard, and Apple certainly has no grounds for lobbing such accusations.



    As a matter of fact, it is iTunes and iTunes alone keeping me from using the Win7 Beta as my main OS. I see a pattern here, Apple incapable of keeping up with Microsoft's latest OS.
  • Reply 7 of 56
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by groverat View Post


    As a matter of fact, it is iTunes and iTunes alone keeping me from using the Win7 Beta as my main OS. I see a pattern here, Apple incapable of keeping up with Microsoft's latest OS.



    Its a beta release, thats why iTunes is not yet supported.



    Apple should be ready for the official windows 7 release, but supporting every beta until then is really pointless.
  • Reply 8 of 56
    ipeonipeon Posts: 1,122member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by KevinN206 View Post


    Please correct me if I am wrong, but the Dock is used to manage

    applications with Expose used for managing windows. Whereas, the new Taskbar in Windows 7 is still used to launch applications and manage windows.



    OK. You have been corrected. The Dock is used to launch apps, switch between running apps as well as manage windows. That is to say, when you have multiple apps running, by clicking the icon of an app in the Dock will bring it's window(s) to the front.



    Expose exposes all windows, or all windows for a specific app or moves all windows aside so as to have a clear view of the desktop.
  • Reply 9 of 56
    nikon133nikon133 Posts: 2,600member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ireland View Post


    I'm not joking, you can now (and I'm aware some people here likely know about this) dock your most frequently used apps in the taskbar, when you drag them is the animation is "chillingly" similar to OS X. You can then right click in the dock just like OS X. Clearly stolen from OS X.



    It really astounds me how little taste and creative originality they have up in Redmond. I'm not saying this as an Apple fanboy, but as a regular Joe. These guys are ridiculous.



    They even chose a number for the name of the OS, what other company uses a numbers to name their OS?



    That doesn't make much sense to me. If there is design that is proven to work nice, why spending resources in "inventing" something different just for the sake of being different, even if it does not perform equally..?



    I would expect that MS people were playing with more than one concept and found this one most satisfying... but personally, I'm also finding it an evolution of previous Windows Quick Launch toolbar; it is not like you could not "dock" your most used apps in Windows before; when you enable Quick Launch toolbar and set it to show large icons (in Vista), result does not look much different than W7 dock.



    I've just started playing with W7 beta and, at this point, I'm even not sure new dock is really any better than old-fashion toolbar. On old toolbar, docked shortcuts and running applications were separated on 2 toolbars, while on W7 they are grouped together. Right now I still prefer separation, but I'll see what happens after I give some time to W7.
  • Reply 10 of 56
    nikon133nikon133 Posts: 2,600member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hmurchison View Post


    LOL



    It pretty much is the Dock and Jumplists are a lot like

    Stacks with rules (last 10 files or so)



    The see through windows feature to the desktop is worse to me than

    Expose's "pushing windows off the screen" feature. It allows me to view the

    desktop and it's not mouse dependent so I can choose an item and then return the

    windows.



    Windows 7 is going to be hyped like "oooooo what is Apple going to do?"



    But frankly I've got everything I need already in OS X right now.



    I'm pi*sed of with Microsoft taking easier path... as they did before. They are developing habit to launch OS to break the ice, and then relaunch it in updated form once dust settles and problems are ironed.



    They did the same thing with Windows 2000 and Windows XP. Now they are doing it with Vista and 7.



    Vista is doing just fine after SP1 and I hate idea of having to upgrade to 7 so quickly... which I'll probably have to as most of our client missed Vista and will - likely - rush on 7 with euphoria. Much as I am concerned, 7 should have been update to Vista, or some kind of Vista Plus package (another thing not unknown to MS).



    But, hey, it is easier for MS to bow to their customers and say "OK, you don't like Vista, we'll get you something new" than to try prove Vista is perfectly OK today, bad publicity aside.
  • Reply 11 of 56
    Just shows how there is next to no originality or imagination left at Microsoft.

    Actually, as I am a Beta Tester for Windows7 I can say that there are a lot of people, in one thread that are posting just how much the new windows dock umm, superbar blows.
  • Reply 12 of 56
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by iMick View Post


    I don't know of any. I know that Apple uses letters.

    I suspect the next Apple OS will be call OS Y.



    Dude OS X is not a letter it stands for OS 10 using roman numeral characters...
  • Reply 13 of 56
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jazz4ivo View Post


    Dude OS X is not a letter it stands for OS 10 using roman numeral characters...



    No. The "X" stands for "Unix." The number following the X is the OS version, currently 10.5. After 10.9, it will roll over to either 10.10 or 11.0; say it with me: OS X 11.0
  • Reply 14 of 56
    kickahakickaha Posts: 8,760member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by groverat View Post


    The Win7 taskbar is not a dock rip-off. The dock wasn't even original in its own right. Accusations of theft are for the weak in this regard, and Apple certainly has no grounds for lobbing such accusations.



    The Dock is based on (as in, a gutted version of) the OPENSTEP 4 Beta Shelf. Which Apple bought the IP for. So no, no theft of ideas involved, just outright purchase. It didn't originate inside Apple, but they did buy the company.
  • Reply 15 of 56
    kickahakickaha Posts: 8,760member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jazz4ivo View Post


    Dude OS X is not a letter it stands for OS 10 using roman numeral characters...



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by FuturePastNow View Post


    No. The "X" stands for "Unix." The number following the X is the OS version, currently 10.5. After 10.9, it will roll over to either 10.10 or 11.0; say it with me: OS X 11.0



    It's a floor wax and a desert topping! You're both right, and you're both wrong.



    It's pronounced, OS Ten, not OS Ex. It is the Roman numeral.



    However, it's part of the brand, not the version number, so OS X 11.0 isn't out of the realm of possibility.
  • Reply 16 of 56
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Kickaha View Post


    It's a floor wax and a desert topping! You're both right, and you're both wrong.



    It's pronounced, OS Ten, not OS Ex. It is the Roman numeral.



    However, it's part of the brand, not the version number, so OS X 11.0 isn't out of the realm of possibility.



    Yes, you're right. It's pronounced OS Ten, but it's not a version number.
  • Reply 17 of 56
    irelandireland Posts: 17,751member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Kickaha


    However, it's part of the brand, not the version number, so OS X 11.0 isn't out of the realm of possibility.



    Well it's part of the brand, but it is X for a reason. X = 10. So it is also a version number, in a way. I don't see why the next Apple OS won't be OS X 10.6, "OS X 11.0" doesn't make sense, and OS XI 11.0 sounds stupid. Frankly, what's in a name anyway. It's what's inside that counts.



    OS Poop FTW!
  • Reply 18 of 56
    o-maco-mac Posts: 777member
    Apple's response? Laughter. Lots of laughter. LOL Laugh Out Loud. Rolling On The Floor.



    Everyone's going to have their good and bad things to say.

    What's new?
  • Reply 19 of 56
    groveratgroverat Posts: 10,872member
    mrpiddly:



    Quote:

    Its a beta release, thats why iTunes is not yet supported.



    Apple should be ready for the official windows 7 release, but supporting every beta until then is really pointless.



    Apple wasn’t ready for the last official Windows release, a release that was at least 2 years in the making. I have no faith that’s going to change with Windows 7.





    Kickaha:



    Quote:

    The Dock is based on (as in, a gutted version of) the OPENSTEP 4 Beta Shelf. Which Apple bought the IP for. So no, no theft of ideas involved, just outright purchase. It didn't originate inside Apple, but they did buy the company.



    And this is built on the assumption that NeXT somehow originated this idea which then, in a linear fashion, made it to Windows 7. Both ideas are, of course, unsupportable except in the context of a desired outcome, which is the tried and true Mac message board canard, “MICROSOFT STOLE IT FROM APPLE”.
  • Reply 20 of 56
    kickahakickaha Posts: 8,760member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by groverat View Post


    And this is built on the assumption that NeXT somehow originated this idea which then, in a linear fashion, made it to Windows 7. Both ideas are, of course, unsupportable except in the context of a desired outcome, which is the tried and true Mac message board canard, “MICROSOFT STOLE IT FROM APPLE”.



    Whatever, 'rat. If you can find an earlier example of the NeXT Shelf than NeXT, I'm all ears, it would be an interesting bit of data. If you can't, then it's pretty clear what the origination point was. FWIW, it stretches back in the NeXT UI to at least NeXTstep 2.0, in what, '88? '89? Hardly unsupportable.



    With minor variations, such as thumbnails, the new Win 7 taskbar looks and acts an awful lot like the Dock. Which is fine, ideas are copied all the time... but to claim it's ZOMG innovative is pretty weak sauce. It's an obvious functional copy, with some refinements, and some throwbacks. Big deal. Windroids will claim it's totally new and innovative, Macdroids will claim it's a direct ripoff, and truth is somewhere in the middle. Arguing otherwise is pointless.
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