End users, developers seen flocking to iPhone apps on wide scale

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
A mobile analytics firm has published new findings which show the iPhone taking the majority of the app market -- especially when it comes to the sheer number of users.



Examining 8 million users and 100 apps, researchers at Flurry hint that Apple's handset has a conspicuous market share lead among developers, the number of apps and the actual range of customers for those apps.



The study, provided to ReadWriteWeb, reveals that 72 percent of the developers being tracked by Flurry are writing for iPhones, while Google's Android is a comparatively distant second at 22 percent. JavaME and BlackBerry had far smaller shares at 5 percent and 1 percent each, though Flurry's marketing VP Peter Farago explains the BlackBerry's weakness as the product of too few BlackBerry developers on its network at the time of the report. He notes that the absence of the smartphone may have its own implications for the interest, or lack of it, in apps for the platform.



"Why haven't [more] BlackBerry developers signed up for analytics?" he asks.



The gap appears less severe in the actual number of apps produced, with the iPhone garnering 64 percent of business where Android and JavaME each have 16 percent, but quickly widens once real-world use is taken into consideration. There, a massive 87 percent of all users are running iPhone apps -- a clear lead that gives Android and JavaME just 6 percent and 7 percent, respectively, of what's left. Blackberries don't register on the chart.



Relative share of the mobile app space in Flurry's metrics. | Image credits: Flurry.



Usage itself is also on the rise, supporting the notion that many of the downloads aren't simply being neglected. While apps have traditionally been orphans, as only 10 percent of smartphone owners have actually used third-party software, Flurry believes many more are now actively running software. Of those apps launched daily, some are invoked as many as 20 times a day.



While the statistics for share and day-to-day use don't reflect the full market as Symbian and Windows Mobile aren't included in the results, they're given as an indicator of the strong interest in Apple's platform versus others -- an effort which will garner more public attention as Apple marks its 1 billionth app download later this week.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 48
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 30,571member
    My favorite apps (I suppose that would have to include Safari) collectively get used at least 50 times a day. A large number of other apps sit idle for weeks at a time, that is if I don't decide to delete them instead.
  • Reply 2 of 48
    dreyfus2dreyfus2 Posts: 1,069member
    While Apple has a clear lead here (as can be expected), I have to say that those numbers for Android are not bad at all. There is only one rather ugly phone so far, and its distribution is fairly limited; still, developers seem to bet on the success of the platform. This does not really hurt Apple a lot, but it could be bad news for new entrants ? supporting too many platforms, all of them having different input methods and varying resolutions, is nothing smaller developers can easily manage.
  • Reply 3 of 48
    vinney57vinney57 Posts: 1,162member
    Android has a future as the 'official opposition' but the others can forget it. It ain't happening. There's really no incentive.
  • Reply 4 of 48
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 30,571member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by vinney57 View Post


    Android has a future as the 'official opposition' but the others can forget it. It ain't happening. There's really no incentive.



    Apple's store and payment method make so many of the alternatives obsolete. I just wish there was a better way to find and navigate apps. I feel like I've just barely scratched the surface of what is available.
  • Reply 5 of 48
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,335member
    This really does need the Symbian, Win Mobile, AND Palm OS included. We don't know the real numbers because of this.
  • Reply 6 of 48
    bageljoeybageljoey Posts: 1,747member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by melgross View Post


    This really does need the Symbian, Win Mobile, AND Palm OS included. We don't know the real numbers because of this.



    I agree. I was wondering at the methodology that had them leaving those out. And the logic behind not mentioning their absence until the end of the article...
  • Reply 7 of 48
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,335member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Bageljoey View Post


    I agree. I was wondering at the methodology that had them leaving those out. And the logic behind not mentioning their absence until the end of the article...



    It seems strange.



    We don't have to like the other platforms to recognize that they exist. They also have a lot of programs. Win Mobile has over 20,000. Palm has almost the same. I have no idea how many Symbian has, though I know it's a lot less. But, surely they have more than Android and RIM!



    So we have no idea where those charts should be.



    Is Apple at 50% on any of them when these others are included? 45%, 40%, 35%?
  • Reply 8 of 48
    dreyfus2dreyfus2 Posts: 1,069member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Bageljoey View Post


    I agree. I was wondering at the methodology that had them leaving those out. And the logic behind not mentioning their absence until the end of the article...



    The way I understand it (fwiw), Flurry is not a market research firm, but a company providing services/advise to mobile application developers (analysis tools like path tracking, cross-promotions, embedded ads, etc.). What they have analyzed here is their own customer base. It seems to be a fairly new company (there is no press release before September '08) and their services seem to be free until now(?)... As they are not around since long, they may mainly have newer, unexperienced developers among their clients. This does likely cause the overweight of new platforms. Symbian and WinMob developers are around since ages, they may not be too interested in consulting from a company being less experienced than themselves?!
  • Reply 9 of 48
    irelandireland Posts: 17,522member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post


    My favorite apps (I suppose that would have to include Safari) collectively get used at least 50 times a day. A large number of other apps sit idle for weeks at a time, that is if I don't decide to delete them instead.



    You should apply for the writing job Spam, when I'm rich and famous we could go for a coffee
  • Reply 10 of 48
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 30,571member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ireland View Post


    You should apply for the writing job Spam, when I'm rich and famous we could go for a coffee



    Gladly! I'll buy.
  • Reply 11 of 48
    frank777frank777 Posts: 5,770member
    I really don't like the idea of monopolies, whether it's Apple or Microsoft at the helm.

    Competition is a good thing.



    I really hope Palm can make a decent comeback to give Apple a run for their money.

    I don't see Android, Symbian or Windows Mobile being a real pain to Apple.
  • Reply 12 of 48
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,335member
    I'n not sure we can count any of them out yet, though Palm is by far, in the worst condition.
  • Reply 13 of 48
    ivan.rnn01ivan.rnn01 Posts: 1,822member
    I don't believe Android would beat iPhone OS in the segment of phones.



    Android may excel in some special areas like linux boxes, which need GSM/3G/... connectivity. But this market is quite narrow... This is their chance (for free)
  • Reply 14 of 48
    ivan.rnn01ivan.rnn01 Posts: 1,822member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    only 10 percent of smartphone owners have actually used third-party software



    That's a habit - instinct - developed since long. Third party software used not to work. Only Apple's approval process's gonna change this...
  • Reply 15 of 48
    hiimamachiimamac Posts: 584member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Bageljoey View Post


    I agree. I was wondering at the methodology that had them leaving those out. And the logic behind not mentioning their absence until the end of the article...



    Why is anyone surprised???? Apple and some sweaty palm fan exec outs this spin everytime msft releases a new stat or commercial plus with apple giving their financials today, no one should be surprised.



    Spin like this is almost as bad as an apple keynote or the first :30 minutes anyway, where apple praises itself over and over and talks about their .01265% growth. LOL
  • Reply 16 of 48
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 1,793member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Frank777 View Post


    I really don't like the idea of monopolies, whether it's Apple or Microsoft at the helm.

    Competition is a good thing.



    I really hope Palm can make a decent comeback to give Apple a run for their money.

    I don't see Android, Symbian or Windows Mobile being a real pain to Apple.



    Monopoly!? Not sure where you get that from. The only company that has anything remotely close to a "monopoly" would be Nokia/Symbian who have about 50% of the worldwide cell phone market.



    Apple/iPhone sit at just above 1% of the cell phone market and about 15%-17% of the smartphone market. Having a huge number of applications and developers for your platform has nothing to do with your marketshare... it has to do with the willingness of end users to purchase and use those applications. It turns out that a higher percentage of iPhone users do just that. That in no way gives Apple a "monopoly".
  • Reply 17 of 48
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 1,793member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by melgross View Post


    This really does need the Symbian, Win Mobile, AND Palm OS included. We don't know the real numbers because of this.



    No, it doesn't. The report was comparing the four platforms only. No where does it say this is representative of the entire market. This report is only showing the differences between the four platforms they study. Symbian, WinMo, and Palm do not factor into it.



    Just because some sites seem to have misrepresented the data here, doesn't mean it is invalid, skewed or wrong. If you only wanted to know how well RIM is doing compared to WinMo, you wouldn't need to include every other platform because it is irrelevant data to your needs.



    This report is only showing the differences between these four platforms... for whatever reason... and should only be viewed that way.
  • Reply 18 of 48
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mjtomlin View Post


    Having a huge number of applications and developers for your platform has nothing to do with your marketshare... it has to do with the willingness of end users to purchase and use those applications.



    That depends on how you are looking at it. With so many applications (and soon to be 3rd-party accessories via the 30-pin connector) Apple's marketshare will continue to grow because they've created an ecosystem for the platform.
  • Reply 19 of 48
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,335member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mjtomlin View Post


    No, it doesn't. The report was comparing the four platforms only. No where does it say this is representative of the entire market. This report is only showing the differences between the four platforms they study. Symbian, WinMo, and Palm do not factor into it.



    Just because some sites seem to have misrepresented the data here, doesn't mean it is invalid, skewed or wrong. If you only wanted to know how well RIM is doing compared to WinMo, you wouldn't need to include every other platform because it is irrelevant data to your needs.



    This report is only showing the differences between these four platforms... for whatever reason... and should only be viewed that way.



    Yes, it does.



    You can't eliminate half to two thirds of the smartphone sales and say that the information provided is meaningful.



    That would be like comparing the car sales of GM, Ford and Chrysler and concluding that GM has 45% marketshare, 60% of leather seats, and 64% of aftermarket add-ons. It's ludicrous!



    I'n not the only one to have noticed this either.



    This is a very biased report, even if it's not intended to be.
  • Reply 20 of 48
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 1,793member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    That depends on how you are looking at it. With so many applications (and soon to be 3rd-party accessories via the 30-pin connector) Apple's marketshare will continue to grow because they've created an ecosystem for the platform.



    But that doesn't give or even guarantee Apple a monopoly position in the market, it just promises a thriving ecosystem. And you can make the argument that it worked out that way for the iPod, but the music player and cell phone markets, while both being mobile devices, are very different markets. The main difference is of course the fact that cell phones are sold along with subscription plans. (Of course, this doesn't apply to the iPod touch, which isn't counted as an iPhone anyway.)
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