Job listings hint at multi-carrier iPhone in Australia, Brazil

Posted:
in iPhone edited January 2014
Following word from individual carriers of wider regional launches, Apple has posted a bevy of new job opportunities that allude to multi-carrier strategies in some -- but not all -- of the iPhone's new territories.



Posted shortly after America Movil and Vodafone announced their international deals with Apple to offer the iPhone, the listings for Australia, Brazil and Mexico all make clear whether new hires are meant to support one or more carriers.



In Australia, posts for a Lead Carrier Certification Engineer and a Field Validation Engineer both have any prospective candidates heading up the approval of iPhones with "Cellular Carriers," according to Apple, potentially making Vodafone's deal just one among others.



The new vacancies lend support to a rumor circulated late last week of a deal with Optus that also claimed the carrier wouldn't have exclusive access to the iPhone. This claim also had Optus announcing its strategy in mid-May, or within weeks of both the new multinational announcements and Apple's Worldwide Developer Conference in mid-June.



A similar pattern is emerging with job listings for Brazil. Apple job entries for Carrier Certification Engineers in lead and general roles, as well as a third for a Field Test Engineer, also indicate that any of the future employees will be asked to help approve the touchscreen handsets for more than one provider.



The South American country has so far only been given iPhone support from America Movil's local division, Claro, but could potentially be served by carriers such as Brasil Telecom, Oi, Vivo, or Telecom Italia's Brazilian operation, TIM Celular. TIM is already poised to offer the iPhone in its native Italy, but hasn't announced any foreign agreements.



Enthusiasts in Mexico may have relatively limited choices, however. A solitary position for a Carrier Certification Engineer in Mexico City only makes mention of a single wireless carrier rather than the plural mentioned elsewhere. This would leave only America Movil's Telcel as the iPhone's supplier in the Latin country. Past rumors haven't suggested multi-carrier deals for the iPhone in the area.



Separately, the Australian listings also make mention of a need for experience with CDMA phone networks as well as GSM, EDGE, and UMTS, but is not believed to relate to the launch of a phone supporting the technology in the country: Telstra, the lone carrier continuing to support CDMA for the island state, shut down the service in late April in favor of its GSM and UMTS networks.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 34
    anantksundaramanantksundaram Posts: 19,416member
    Oh boy. As this juggernaut relentlessly rolls on, there are surely a few quaking boots and shaking heads in telecom-land.
  • Reply 2 of 34
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anantksundaram View Post


    Oh boy. As this juggernaut relentlessly rolls on, there are surely a few quaking boots and shaking heads in telecom-land.



    You make it sound like millions of Imperial Star Destroyers overtaking each country like a quadrant of the galaxy. Only the Google Android rebels have a chance of stopping them. (I'm shutting up now, I'm not even a big fan of Star Wars)
  • Reply 3 of 34
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 31,504member
    I pray every night that the next day would be the end of the Apple and at&t contract... and it never is.
  • Reply 4 of 34
    drjjonesdrjjones Posts: 162member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post


    I pray every night that the next day would be the end of the Apple and at&t contract... and it never is.



    Even Steve Jobs has a learning curve .
  • Reply 5 of 34
    gregalexandergregalexander Posts: 1,383member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SpamSandwich View Post


    I pray every night that the next day would be the end of the Apple and at&t contract... and it never is.



    No help for you with AT&T, but I'm wondering if the lack of similar "multi-country" announcements from O2/Telefonica, Orange, and Deutsche Telecom is because Apple has said to them "You can sell the iPhone in all the other countries you have networks in, as long as you are willing to drop the exclusive contract you have now".



    I mean... it really seems Apple is now signing up the multi-country carriers, and removing exclusivity... and the current setup in Europe hasn't worked so far, so why not make this a carrot for change.



    edit: I'm assuming AT&T doesn't have cell networks in other countries.
  • Reply 6 of 34
    mrsneezymrsneezy Posts: 47member
    Is this yet another silly American Statement.



    Australia has States.. but is not a State of the USA... We are our own Country



    I would have thaught that AppleInsider would get it right.



  • Reply 7 of 34
    yvo84yvo84 Posts: 84member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MRsneezy View Post


    Is this yet another silly American Statement.



    Australia has States.. but is not a State of the USA... We are our own Country



    I would have thaught that AppleInsider would get it right.







    "A state is a political association with effective sovereignty over a geographic area."



    The country is a state, but not in the same way the various states are known within the country (like Victoria or New South Wales).



    I'll quote wiki:



    "Although the term often includes broadly all institutions of government or rule?ancient and modern?the modern state system bears a number of characteristics that were first consolidated in western Europe, beginning in earnest in the 15th century, when the term "state" also acquired its current meaning. Thus the word is often used in a strict sense to refer only to modern political systems.



    Within a federal system, the term state also refers to political units, not completely sovereign themselves; however, these systems are subject to the authority of a constitution defining a federal union which is partially or co-sovereign with them. Thus we find the "states and territories of Australia" and the "states" in the United States of America"













    Anyway, there's nothing wrong with the article.
  • Reply 8 of 34
    kiwirobkiwirob Posts: 26member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post


    Separately, the Australian listings also make mention of a need for experience with CDMA phone networks as well as GSM, EDGE, and UMTS, but is not believed to relate to the launch of a phone supporting the technology in the country: Telstra, the lone carrier continuing to support CDMA for the island state, shut down the service in late April in favor of its GSM and UMTS networks.



    Sorry for a lame first post guys, but I have noticed in a few recent posts about Australia it's been referred to as an "island state" or similar.



    Just though I'd contribute that with 7,686,850 sq km of land Australia is just slightly smaller than the US contiguous 48 states. It also resides on it's own tectonic plate and is geologically considered it's own continent. Every time I read "island state" I get a picture in my head of something like Fiji, Tahiti or a small group of tropical islands like Hawaii which it is not.



    Being from New Zealand I shouldn't really try stick up for Australia as they steal everything good from New Zealand and claim it for their own but hey?
  • Reply 9 of 34
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by yvo84 View Post


    "A state is a political association with effective sovereignty over a geographic area."



    The country is a state, but not in the same way the various states are known within the country (like Victoria or New South Wales).



    I'll quote wiki:



    "Although the term often includes broadly all institutions of government or rule?ancient and modern?the modern state system bears a number of characteristics that were first consolidated in western Europe, beginning in earnest in the 15th century, when the term "state" also acquired its current meaning. Thus the word is often used in a strict sense to refer only to modern political systems.



    Within a federal system, the term state also refers to political units, not completely sovereign themselves; however, these systems are subject to the authority of a constitution defining a federal union which is partially or co-sovereign with them. Thus we find the "states and territories of Australia" and the "states" in the United States of America"



    Anyway, there's nothing wrong with the article.



    And to further back that up, Wikipedia redirects island state to island country, though I was unable to find any usage of the island state refers to use a published example.
  • Reply 10 of 34
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kiwirob View Post


    Sorry for a lame first post guys, but I have noticed in a few recent posts about Australia it's been referred to as an "island state" or similar.



    Just though I'd contribute that with 7,686,850 sq km of land Australia is just slightly smaller than the US contiguous 48 states. It also resides on it's own tectonic plate and is geologically considered it's own continent. Every time I read "island state" I get a picture in my head of something like Fiji, Tahiti or a small group of tropical islands like Hawaii which it is not.



    Being from New Zealand I shouldn't really try stick up for Australia as they steal everything good from New Zealand and claim it for their own but hey?



    Wow! Two first time posters commenting on the same word usage within minutes. Kiwirob cleared it up in an above post, though I'm curious why you think other island nations are acceptable but not Australia. Is it because it is a continent too, or because or its size.



    Oddly, we've had some Aussies claim that Australia isn't a continent but a country last week... or vice versa, it was too bizarre to recall correctly.



    Welcome to AI MRsneezy and Kiwirob.
  • Reply 11 of 34
    kiwirobkiwirob Posts: 26member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    Oddly, we've had some Aussies claim that Australia isn't a continent but a country last week... or vice versa, it was to bizarre to recall correctly.



    Welcome to AI MRsneezy and Kiwirob.



    Thanks for the welcome solipsism.



    I wouldn't listen to too much to what any Aussies have to say, they are not known for the brains. In fact a former Prime Minister of New Zealand, Sir Robert Muldoon, when asked about the raise in migration of Kiwi's to Australia is quoted as saying,"New Zealanders who emigrate to Australia raise the IQ of both countries." hehe.
  • Reply 12 of 34
    virgil-tb2virgil-tb2 Posts: 1,416member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by solipsism View Post


    Wow! Two first time posters commenting on the same word usage within minutes. Kiwirob cleared it up in an above post, though I'm curious why you think other island nations are acceptable but not Australia. Is it because it is a continent too, or because or its size.



    Oddly, we've had some Aussies claim that Australia isn't a continent but a country last week... or vice versa, it was to bizarre to recall correctly.



    Welcome to AI MRsneezy and Kiwirob.



    Just to chime in ... I was writing a post about the poor word choice myself and then had second thoughts because it is a bit of a trivial issue. But it would have been three separate people complaining in that time frame.



    While technically, you can get away with calling Australia an "Island State" no one actually does very often as it's just a dumb way to phrase it. The usage of the term evolved AFAIK as a reference to England, applying it to Australia just to be clever and because (technically) it's still (sort of) accurate just shows that the author hasn't been around that long or is a bit of a novice writer. As wiki says, "Island Country" is more accurate, but that's a term that even less people use.



    Why not just forget about making up new terms and stick with "Country," "Continent" or even just "Australia?"
  • Reply 13 of 34
    jadamsjadams Posts: 20member
    Trying to get the discussion back on track...



    This article http://www.stuff.co.nz/4515022a28.html suggests that despite Vodaphone announcing that they are bringing the iPhone to New Zealand, Telecom, the other major carrier here, is also likely to offer the iPhone.
  • Reply 14 of 34
    kiwirobkiwirob Posts: 26member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jadams View Post


    Trying to get the discussion back on track...



    This article http://www.stuff.co.nz/4515022a28.html suggests that despite Vodaphone announcing that they are bringing the iPhone to New Zealand, Telecom, the other major carrier here, is also likely to offer the iPhone.



    I think Telecom NZ is trying to play catch up with Vodafone and not succeeding. Telecom NZ currently runs a CDMA network which it's in the process of updating
    Quote:

    Last month, Telecom hinted the iPhone could be used on its $300 million 850MHz GSM/Edge network, to be introduced in November.



    Why would anybody want to buy a 3G iPhone only to be able to run it on Edge technology?
  • Reply 15 of 34
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by MRsneezy View Post


    Is this yet another silly American Statement.



    Australia has States.. but is not a State of the USA... We are our own Country



    I would have thaught that AppleInsider would get it right.







    You're kidding we've been a client state for years, sport!



    Korea, Vietnam, Iraq, McDonalds



    Let Star Wars begin !
  • Reply 16 of 34
    merdheadmerdhead Posts: 587member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kiwirob View Post


    Sorry for a lame first post guys, but I have noticed in a few recent posts about Australia it's been referred to as an "island state" or similar.



    Just though I'd contribute that with 7,686,850 sq km of land Australia is just slightly smaller than the US contiguous 48 states. It also resides on it's own tectonic plate and is geologically considered it's own continent. Every time I read "island state" I get a picture in my head of something like Fiji, Tahiti or a small group of tropical islands like Hawaii which it is not.



    Being from New Zealand I shouldn't really try stick up for Australia as they steal everything good from New Zealand and claim it for their own but hey?



    And in return New Zealanders come over to Aus and steal the women and collect unemployment benefits.
  • Reply 17 of 34
    merdheadmerdhead Posts: 587member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kiwirob View Post


    I think Telecom NZ is trying to play catch up with Vodafone and not succeeding. Telecom NZ currently runs a CDMA network which it's in the process of updating Why would anybody want to buy a 3G iPhone only to be able to run it on Edge technology?



    Because 3G isn't everywhere, but GSM is. If you don't have EDGE, then you get GPRS at a maximum of 80Kbps.
  • Reply 18 of 34
    jfanningjfanning Posts: 3,393member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by merdhead View Post


    And in return New Zealanders come over to Aus and steal the women and collect unemployment benefits.



    Nope, I think you will find the ability for New Zealanders to claim Aussie benefits was changed a long time ago
  • Reply 19 of 34
    alpichalpich Posts: 96member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kiwirob View Post


    Sorry for a lame first post guys, but I have noticed in a few recent posts about Australia it's been referred to as an "island state" or similar.



    Just though I'd contribute that with 7,686,850 sq km of land Australia is just slightly smaller than the US contiguous 48 states. It also resides on it's own tectonic plate and is geologically considered it's own continent. Every time I read "island state" I get a picture in my head of something like Fiji, Tahiti or a small group of tropical islands like Hawaii which it is not.



    Being from New Zealand I shouldn't really try stick up for Australia as they steal everything good from New Zealand and claim it for their own but hey?



    When I was but a little child at School Australia was always stated as the largest island and the smallest continent. But only about 3 months ago I found out that Australia is no longer considered an island.



    One day I am fairly certain that Earth will be a comet, The sun will be just a gas giant and we will find out we are all revolving around a giant space panda bear.
  • Reply 20 of 34
    nvidia2008nvidia2008 Posts: 9,262member
    Umm... here in "t3h England" we speak in Asia Pacific... "Island state" is usually used in writing about Singapore, not Australia.



    "Telstra, the lone carrier continuing to support CDMA for the island state, shut down the service in late April in favor of its GSM and UMTS networks." could be better written as:



    Telstra, the lone carrier continuing to support CDMA for the continent, shut down the service in late April in favor of its GSM and UMTS networks.



    ?Eh?



    It is interesting to note Telstra supports a massive, rural mobile network. Despite how much I hate Telstra, that part of their service, is probably nothing to sneeze at.
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