Apple previews Mac OS X Snow Leopard with QuickTime X

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  • Reply 41 of 182
    pg4gpg4g Posts: 383member
    Yeah,



    I do think Dual Cores will benefit too though - optimizing over two cores is extremely important and the fact that the two companies, Microsoft and Apple, have not worked with this till now is greatly suprising and sad.



    Its good to see Apple changing things up and doing this though.



    Even for us, however, if they are optimizing code, it will still be great for users of computers that are less than 3 years old. It provides an ultrastable OS.



    That is ALWAYS good.
  • Reply 42 of 182
    pt123pt123 Posts: 696member
    So if it is just performance and stability, what is there to preview? Come look at see this computer "not crash", see how much faster the window opens when I double click?
  • Reply 43 of 182
    mac-sochistmac-sochist Posts: 675member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by pt123 View Post


    So if it is just performance and stability, what is there to preview? Come look at see this computer "not crash", see how much faster the window opens when I double click?



    Maybe if and when Windows 7 comes out, Microsoft should have a preview like this--see if they can get through an hour-and-fifty-minute address without crashing. That would be a milestone of sorts....
  • Reply 44 of 182
    I bet we will get 1 major new feature in 10.6...



    Full ZFS



    If this is code optimization, wouldn't you say ZFS would be a way to optimze the file system?
  • Reply 45 of 182
    unotherunother Posts: 40member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by minderbinder View Post


    Exactly what I was thinking. The answer to 4 is probably yes if it is very cheap or free. If it's 129 and doesn't add much but helps performance on apps that need it, you'll probably see people running those apps upgrading, but most average users skipping it.



    It does seem odd that they are hyping the javascript update so much when it's something that should be included with 10.5.x.



    Hopefully they'll clarify the intel/PPC thing today at the session, anyone know when it's over?



    Personally, based on the multi-core hype, I think the floor will be multi-processor G5s.



    IOW, single-processor G5 1.6/1.8 won't be supported; G4 (naturally) won't be supported (multi-processor or not). All other G5s will be supported.
  • Reply 46 of 182
    macserverxmacserverx Posts: 217member
    First I'd like to mention that Windows 7 isn't even expected to ship until Late 2009/Early 2010, which Snow Leopard will more than readily beat.



    Things I'd like to see in Snow Leopard:

    ? "Grand Central" - sounds like an expansion of NSOperation/NSOperationQueue

    ? OpenCL (BTW, I cannot find anything about this online. Is this still internal LOOKING to be an Open Standard???)

    ? ZFS - Please...ZFS snapshots = Snappy Time Machine. And while you have those 4 cores, might as well do on the fly disk compression and save some drive space.



    Snow Leopard is the enterprise targeted OS X.

    ? Pull the Exchange support from iPhone into the rest of the OS

    ? mobileme for enterprises (on Server)



    I'm sure there's other things that just aren't coming to mind.
  • Reply 47 of 182
    edubedub Posts: 37member
    can't wait for the all-white GUI
  • Reply 48 of 182
    It doesn't seem like much of an upgrade unless you have a 64-bit (Intel) multi-core CPU, with a dedicated GPU capable of OpenCL and *lots* of RAM. Or, if you want to use Mail.app with an Exchange server.
  • Reply 49 of 182
    sc_marktsc_markt Posts: 1,397member
    I'm wondering if there are issues (serious issues, not the normal ones) with 10.5 which might be the reason for 10.6 to just "focus on perfecting the world's most advanced operating system?"
  • Reply 50 of 182
    bregaladbregalad Posts: 816member
    What people seem to be missing here is that dropping PPC now would send a terrible message to the CIOs of the world. Dropping support for a 3 year old computer sets a horrible precedent that essentially tells the corporate world that unless they replace all their computers every 3 years, they risk having Apple pull the rug out from under them.



    What a terrible message to send at a time when Apple has a real opportunity to get into enterprise.



    Enterprise standardizes on a single OS across the organization whenever possible. For those running Windows everything from 8 year old Pentiums and Athlons to today's quad core based PCs can run the same OS. For those running MacOS there's no way to standardize on a single OS because old machines can't run Leopard and new machines can't run Tiger. Adding another set of OS requirements to the mix next year would make matters even worse.
  • Reply 51 of 182
    also Enterprise like systems that are easy to open to swap parts out and they don't like haveing to ship the system out with HD to have it fixed.



    They also like to reuse screens and not be tied to AIO systems.



    They also tend to buy $600 to $1500 desktop systems and they don't $2200+ systems for evey user. They also tend to pass down older system when they get new ones and like to keep spare parts on hand.
  • Reply 52 of 182
    mimicmimic Posts: 72member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Fotek2001 View Post


    But...



    1) Will it work on PowerPC Macs?

    2) How much will it cost?

    3) Will we really have to wait a year for a JavaScript engine that's in nightly webkit builds?

    4) Will anyone upgrade if there are no new features?



    1) I own a G5 and i hope SL drops it! Apple needs to focus on forward technology, not the past. M$ would benefit from this also.

    2) Same. Mostly intended for new computers and speed junkies.

    3) dunno

    4) As others have said, stability and speed ARE features.



    If OS X is becoming increasingly popular, viruses will soon be a threat. Hardening the OS for this day now is prudent. Ridding the OS of obsolete tech and writing a foundation to build new tech is critical to Touch and Speech technology.



    Sure, those using email and the web don't need SPEED, but those doing even iMovie or FCE could use every bit of speed.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Mr. H View Post


    I for one am very happy to see a major software company focussing on performance rather than piling on more and more useless crap, aka "features".



    Now that it looks like the clock-speed race is over in CPU land, and it's switched to a number-of-cores race, research and development into how best to leverage that parallel processing is vital.



    Anyone know where to go to get more juicy info on Snow Leopard? How long was the presentation? Hopefully ars will have something at some point.



    I agree. I think it is great to re-focus attention before the next wave of features.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by stokessd View Post


    That strikes me as a subtle way of saying that our current OS is more buggy and crappy than we'd like and we're going to take a year and fix it all.



    Sheldon



    LOL Not even close! All code can be optimized and cleaned up. And while you are at it, why not build into it forward looking technology to build tomorrows features on it and take your time doing it, rather than try to rush the framework and feature set in one release.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by pt123 View Post


    So if it is just performance and stability, what is there to preview? Come look at see this computer "not crash", see how much faster the window opens when I double click?



    I don't recall seeing where all the current features are being taken out. You can still show your friends that you're kool with all the current features, and the huge performance increase. The ease of use, along with speed should impress even your Dad.
  • Reply 53 of 182
    doctorgonzodoctorgonzo Posts: 529member
    The only thing that concerns me is the open question of Core Duo support. I really, really don't want to be burned for buying a first-gen Intel Mac.
  • Reply 54 of 182
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tauron View Post


    1. Hopefully not. I hope they don't waste resources to support a computer nobody should have anymore.



    What kind of a comment is this?



    I have a dual 2.5 GHz PowerMac G5 at work and it suits me just fine. I have no real need for more speed in that particular environment, where I mainly use it as a multiple-Terminal/Web browser/IM/PDF viewer/X11/etc. type of setup.



    Dropping PowerPC G4 support would be bad enough - but dropping G5 support is just silly.
  • Reply 55 of 182
    jasenj1jasenj1 Posts: 922member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Joe_the_dragon View Post


    also Enterprise like systems that are easy to open to swap parts out and they don't like haveing to ship the system out with HD to have it fixed.



    They also like to reuse screens and not be tied to AIO systems.



    They also tend to buy $600 to $1500 desktop systems and they don't $2200+ systems for evey user. They also tend to pass down older system when they get new ones and like to keep spare parts on hand.



    Not the enterprise I work for. New machines every three years. Surplus or donate out the old ones. See ya! Maybe schools or smaller companies hold on to old hardware, but my understanding of accounting and what-not is that the machines get depreciated and then OUTTA THERE! Sure, labs and other odd-ball long-term installations hang around, but end users get new machines.



    And while I'm here...



    As others have said, under-the-covers optimizations, reorganizations, API clean ups, and other such things end users never see are a big deal and very worthy of a new OS release. Too bad Microsoft doesn't understand this and instead designs OSes to consume all resources of machines five years in the future. Apple has been VERY good about each OS version running even faster on older hardware.



    I'm very glad to see Apple seriously trying to take advantage of modern CPUs and GPUs, and provide tools to expose that power to developers. I don't think MS has done anything similar.



    I'd like to see more info about resolution independence. We know it's there, when will it become mainstream?



    - Jasen.
  • Reply 56 of 182
    irelandireland Posts: 17,785member
    Mac touch



    They can't add a whole host of features to Leopard if they are going to be spending so much of their time and resources making the cocoa touch layer for the whole Leopard OS. Things like copy and paste need to be properly thought through, and simply things like drag and drop and the full computer -> touch metaphors have to be properly created and tested from the ground up. That won't be an easy task and will take about 2 years to complete, of which they started this process sometime during last year probably.



    That's why Snow Leopard won't be called Lynx, Cougar, or my personal favorite Lion. Essentially it will still be Leopard - even with a full cocoa touch, user interface layer and all the optimizations and security benefits.



    Maybe the actual shipping name will be OS X Leopard touch, or maybe they'll keep the name Snow Leopard to allow them the room to market it to Mac users with existing (non-touch) hardware as a complete overhaul, and as part of the Mac touch to those new users as a speedy, multi-touch version of Leopard - without being tied into a single "touch" marketing term. It's optimized and touchy-feely!



    It certainly won't be just optimizations and security benefits though that's for damn sure!
  • Reply 57 of 182
    wheelhotwheelhot Posts: 465member
    Well if its free, thats good or a $20 upgrade
  • Reply 58 of 182
    ipeonipeon Posts: 1,122member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by archer75 View Post


    Apple may indeed be moving to opening up OSX to run on PC's.



    Bingo!



    The time has arrived.
  • Reply 59 of 182
    kim kap solkim kap sol Posts: 2,987member
    Riiight.



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by iPeon View Post


    Bingo!



    The time has arrived.



  • Reply 60 of 182
    irelandireland Posts: 17,785member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by iPeon View Post


    Bingo!



    The time has arrived.



    A lot of people are discussing that recently (J.G. etc.) what with the dropping of "Mac" in the OS's name and all.







    I said they should have does this a while ago, but now the timing seems pretty perfect. The ball's in their court, it's time for Steve to get off his high horse and realize this won't last forever and there'll come a time when Linux is as as to use and Google releases their own OS. The timing is right, he made this mistake in the 80's. This could be different.
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