Progress made on Apple's potential second Cupertino campus

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
In the works for years, Apple's new campus in Cupertino, Calif., was finally given preliminary approval this week, potentially paving the way for the company to expand to a new 7.78 acre property.



The Cupertino Planning Commission unanimously voted Monday to rezone the property along Pruneridge Avenue to the category of planned development industrial and residential, according to Los Angeles Daily News. Last April, Apple was unsuccessful in obtaining the same rezoning.



"Some commissioners wanted a more definitive proposal from Apple before rezoning a prime piece of residential land. The new zoning allows for both office and residential use," the report said. "The site, which is south of the Hewlett-Packard campus, houses two office buildings currently occupied by Apple employees."



Apple purchased the property in 2006, but at that point it had been previously rezoned by the city to clear the way for a 130-acre condominium project. Michael Foulkes with Apple denied to the Daily News that Apple intends to build a campus on the site. Right now, he said, the company is just trying to assess its options.



But the 7.78 acre property is one of a number the company purchased with the original intent of building a 50-acre campus.



In 2006, Apple co-founder Steve Jobs himself appeared at a Cupertino City Council meeting and explained that his company's growth has forced it to expand to buildings that are far away from the Apple campus.



"What's happened at Apple is that our business has basically tripled in the last five or six years," Jobs said more than three years ago to the council. "And what that's meant, is that our headcount in Cupertino has dramatically expanded."



Jobs said, at the time, that Apple planned to level the buildings located on the 50-acre lot to form what would eventually become the company's second home, about a mile away from its current headquarters. In 2006, it was said that it would take three to four years to design and build the campus, which would house 3,000 to 3,500 employees.



Since that meeting, though, the plans have fallen behind schedule, as Apple failed to gain the necessary approvals to move forward. But this week's approval would seem to suggest the new campus is once again a possibility.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 26
    What is a campus?
  • Reply 2 of 26
    asciiascii Posts: 5,936member
    3 years of fighting the bureaucracy in order to expand your premises. And people wonder why there is 10% unemployment.
  • Reply 3 of 26
    dluxdlux Posts: 666member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by manray View Post


    What is a campus?



    What is a dictionary?
  • Reply 4 of 26
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by manray View Post


    What is a campus?



    This is the result of people losing their minds to be first in line!
  • Reply 5 of 26
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dlux View Post


    What is a dictionary?



    Look how smart you are!
  • Reply 6 of 26
    teckstudteckstud Posts: 6,476member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by manray View Post


    What is a campus?



    That's California talk for an industrial (office)park.
  • Reply 7 of 26
    teckstudteckstud Posts: 6,476member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by manray View Post


    What is a campus?



    That's like the equivalent of being called a "guest" in a Starbucks line rather than a customer.
  • Reply 8 of 26
    ouraganouragan Posts: 437member
    I can't understand why Apple doesn't expand its current campus by buying up neighbours or move to a different location, e.g. the Hewlett-Packard campus.





  • Reply 9 of 26
    dluxdlux Posts: 666member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Albebaubles View Post


    Look how smart you are!



    You know, if someone asked about something complex or technical, I would agree with your point. But asking for a definition that is one control-click away does not advance the state of knowledge here.



    And remember: Give a man a fish, and he eats for one day. Teach a man to fish, and the whole office becomes a lot quieter on Friday afternoons.
  • Reply 10 of 26
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dlux View Post


    You know, if someone asked about something complex or technical, I would agree with your point. But asking for a definition that is one control-click away does not advance the state of knowledge here.



    I agree. It?s a single word that would take less time to look up than it would to ask the question in a forum.
  • Reply 11 of 26
    leonardleonard Posts: 528member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by manray View Post


    What is a campus?



    A bunch of buildings, usually with some parkland or gardens in between, and a few parking lots.



    It's like a University campus. You have a bunch of buildings which may be connected by walkways, with greenspace in between. It's sometimes like a small city, with cafeterias, banks, residences, classrooms, halls, libraries, separate colleges, etc, game rooms, bars, etc.



    Business campuses usually involve office buildings, research buildings, manufacturing, etc...
  • Reply 12 of 26
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by ouragan View Post


    I can't understand why Apple doesn't expand its current campus by buying up neighbours or move to a different location, e.g. the Hewlett-Packard campus.











    I hear Redmond has some excellent office space available in a prime location.
  • Reply 13 of 26
    sheffsheff Posts: 1,407member
    Does anyone know how far away these campuses are from Google's? Maybe apple is moving away so that google can't steal their ideas as they are building Google Phone.



    Correction, never mind it is in cupertino so still a short drive away.
  • Reply 14 of 26
    Infinite Loop is fairly landlocked; buying up the individual homes to the east might work, but a campus allows for smooth flow of people between buildings, and not just more space. Trying to marry the loop with another property would be pretty hard. Maybe they should do something to support public transportation and expand into the parking lots... Cupertino has virtually no access to BART or Caltrain (7-10 miles to closest station).



    I thought their new campus was well into design at this point. Odd.
  • Reply 15 of 26
    irelandireland Posts: 17,798member
    Companies like Google and Apple use the word campus to disguise the fact that they are really billion dollar publicly traded commercial companies.



    Is it still going to be 50 acres?
  • Reply 16 of 26
    Excellent news, plenty of space there to host AMD + ATI!!!!



    Make it happen Apple!!





    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JasonBee View Post


    I hear Redmond has some excellent office space available in a prime location.



    ahah, great post, but I heard it has a rather foul armpit ambience to it.
  • Reply 17 of 26
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ireland View Post


    Companies like Google and Apple use the word campus to disguise the fact that they are really billion dollar publicly traded commercial companies.



    Really? This term has been around for decades as a description of large corporate office complexes, especially in the technology industry. It isn't meant to disguise anything AFAIK, and if it is, it certainly isn't working.
  • Reply 18 of 26
    irelandireland Posts: 17,798member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dr Millmoss View Post


    Really? This term has been around for decades as a description of large corporate office complexes, especially in the technology industry.



    Yeah, and that's the reason. Don't be surprised, don't be so naive.
  • Reply 19 of 26
    solipsismsolipsism Posts: 25,726member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ireland View Post


    Companies like Google and Apple use the word campus to disguise the fact that they are really billion dollar publicly traded commercial companies.



    Is it still going to be 50 acres?



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ireland View Post


    Yeah, and that's the reason. Don't be surprised, don't be so naive.



    Why would companies reveal how big and powerful they are in every single way expect when it comes to the technical nomenclature of their complex? That makes no sense.



    I?d wager that it?s the intra/internet that made this term popular. Computer networks starting with government and then moving to university. Multiple networks between buildings all under the same overall administration but often with separate support and access were not a LANs or WANs. It seems obvious that these LANs all within a relatively small geographic location would be called a Campus Area Network (CAN). Less often used and more accurately for spanning between a larger, yet smaller geographic area but with geographic areas in between not connected to the CAN or LAN were called Metropolitan Area Networks.



    I see no skullduggery here with the naming. Hell, Google calls their main site the Googleplex. Not exactly a name you want if you are trying to be humble.
  • Reply 20 of 26
    docno42docno42 Posts: 3,758member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ireland View Post


    Companies like Google and Apple use the word campus to disguise the fact that they are really billion dollar publicly traded commercial companies.



    That's funny, the government has campuses. Universities have campuses. Hospitals have campuses.



    Me thinks you are reaching into a very odd place with your comment.
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