iOS jailbreakers thwarted by Apple's latest version of iBooks

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  • Reply 61 of 163
    All people with a jailbroken iPhone have decided the benefits of jailbreaking outweigh the benefits of using the iPhone as Apple designed it and have no leg to stand on when complaining that certain features don't work the same or at all. Jailbreaking may be a legal thing to do but Apple is under no obligation to service or make sure those devices work the same as non-jailbroken iPhones. It's very simple.
  • Reply 62 of 163
    doesn't this only work if you install the patch to run jailbroken apps ? seeing as if you don't the drm book that apple tests it with won't load and then you should be ok . ?
  • Reply 63 of 163
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by LordJohnWhorfin View Post


    If I can unlock my iPhone, run MyWi (which I paid for) instead of paying AT&T extra for bandwidth I already purchased, run XBMC, SBSettings, FolderEnhancer...



    Until then, I'll jailbreak. The iPhone and iPad are fantastic devices, but they are too restricted by Apple. If they make it impossible to hack them, I will choose one of the many options that are quickly becoming available (Android, WebOS...)

    And no, I don't pirate apps or books. I pay for everything. Which is another reason why I, as a paying customer, refuse to let the vendors dictate how I will use the stuff I purchased.



    Fine. Nothing wrong with what you said or what you are doing. Just realize that by jailbreaking you can't complain if Apple changes something in iOS that affects the functionality of your device. Apple is under NO obligation to jailbroken devices. None. That's the trade off for the functionality you desire.
  • Reply 64 of 163
    addaboxaddabox Posts: 12,664member
    Where do people get the idea that not offering some desired functionality or compatibility on a computing device is "illegal"?



    Apple could update Quicktime so that it doesn't play any legacy files. They could make Keynote stop importing Power Point presentations, or, um, switch processors so that the only way to run old apps would be through an emulation layer, and even drop support for those apps entirely, on a schedule of their choosing.



    Apple could make the next iteration of OS X reduce your Mac to an inoperable and inert lump of silicon and aluminum. While being competitively unwise and really really bad for customer relations, none of those things would be "illegal", at least not if Apple was reasonably clear about its intentions at the point of purchase.



    Apple has never claimed it would support jailbreaking or be nice about it or not actively discourage it. They can make their software do pretty much what they like without worrying about being dragged into court by folks who wanted it to do something else.



    And this "I bought it, I own it, I should be able to do whatever I want with it" is a complete red herring. Of course you can do what you want with it. Set it on fire, reverse engineer it, grant it sentience, if you know how. It's just that Apple doesn't have to support your efforts. They can even make it harder for you, in software or in how they construct the device. Anyone want to claim that it's "illegal" for Apple to use security screws on their cases? Because, you know, it's yours and you should be able to pull it apart as easily as you would like to, without damaging the case or voiding the warranty?
  • Reply 65 of 163
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by yensid98 View Post


    All people with a jailbroken iPhone have decided the benefits of jailbreaking outweigh the benefits of using the iPhone as Apple designed it and have no leg to stand on when complaining that certain features don't work the same or at all. Jailbreaking may be a legal thing to do but Apple is under no obligation to service or make sure those devices work the same as non-jailbroken iPhones. It's very simple.



    Agreed.



    Additionally, people mis-state things when they say that jailbreaking is "legal."



    Jailbreaking has not been declared "legal." What happened is that the decision was made that jailbreaking is "not illegal" (provided certain conditions prevail). It may not seem like it but that's a big difference. One of those conditions is that if the purpose of the jailbreaking is itself to break the law or assist in breaking the law, then it's no longer a legal thing to do.



    In other words, if your intention when jailbreaking is to get around the DRM on the iBooks store, then it's 100% illegal. Jailbreaking as it currently exists enables one to get around the DRM on the contents of the iBooks store, therefore it enables an illegal act.



    All of this is admittedly quite hazy, but people going on about how "jailbreaking is 100% legal" and that this should somehow trump Apple's attempts to lock down content and so forth are being ignorant at best.
  • Reply 66 of 163
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by lewisdorigo View Post


    I'd just like to point out that "law allows jailbreaking" thing is technically inaccurate.



    It was decided that distributing custom firmware onto the device wasn't violating copyright. There's a big difference. All it means is that Apple couldn't sue the Dev Team for copyright infringement. It doesn't mean that they have to allow jailbreaking.





    You also agreed to various usage terms and conditions when signing up to get the phone, as well as when buying books from the iBooks Store. If you're not happy with the terms you signed up for, then don't agree to them. Simple as that.







    Who owns your iPhone??

    Quote:

    This patent gives the impression that Apple believes they have or will have the right to investigate customers they believe are using their device in an ?unauthorized? way.



    SYSTEMS AND METHODS FOR IDENTIFYING UNAUTHORIZED USERS OF AN ELECTRONIC DEVICE

    Quote:

    Abstract

    This is generally directed to identifying unauthorized users of an electronic device. In some embodiments, an unauthorized user of the electronic device can be detected by identifying particular activities that may indicate suspicious behavior. In some embodiments, an unauthorized user can be detected by comparing the identity of the current user to the identity of the owner of the electronic device. When an unauthorized user is detected, various safety measures can be taken. For example, information related to the identity of the unauthorized user, the unauthorized user's operation of the electronic device, or the current location of the electronic device can be gathered. As another example, functions of the electronic device can be restricted. In some embodiments, the owner of the electronic device can be notified of the unauthorized user by sending an alert notification through any suitable medium, such as, for example, a voice mail, e-mail, or text message.



    9.1.3 Freedom to Tinker: Who Owns Your iPhone, Anyway?

    Quote:

    You may think you own the device you bought last week from a retailer. But it is increasingly the case that what you own is only the hardware; you don?t own the right to use it the way you want to use it, even for entirely legal purposes.....



    A lockdown on PCs and a corresponding rise of tethered appliances [like the iPhone] will eliminate what today we take for granted: a world where mainstream technology can be influenced, even revolutionized, out of left field. Stopping this future depends on some wisely developed and implemented locks, along with new technologies and a community ethos that secures the keys to those locks among groups with shared norms and a sense of public purpose, rather than in the hands of a single gatekeeping entity, whether public or private.....



  • Reply 67 of 163
    So jailbreaking is legal. I purchased books from Apple and Apple has now made it impossible for me to read these books as long as I legally jailbreak. Well, now I'll simply buy from Amazon, use the Kindle reader (on the iPad) and piss on Apple's iBooks. And yes, jailbreaking IS legal. You need to read the statement from the US Government's Library of Congress. If it is not illegal, then it is legal. It is legal to do ANYTHING that is not specifically declared illegal (US Constitution). Unless you live in another country, it's not hazy at all. Now once jailbroken, it becomes easy to do illegal acts like use pirated software. I don't thing there's anyone that will contend that pirated software is legal or moral to use in any fashion. This ability is one reason Apple fights jailbreaking. Apple's desire to control 100% of the user experience is another.



    It is correct that Apple is under no obligation to cater to jailbroken devices. They can and do everything they can to block jailbreaking. My gripe right now is that I paid Apple for books. I paid Apple for my iPhone and iPad. By blocking me, I feel that Apple has stolen my money. I didn't steal any of their software, hardware or anything else. The two Cydia apps I have I also paid for. Cydia has not cheated me. But now Apple has cheated me. Allow me to get a refund for books I purchased through iBookstore and I'll be happy.
  • Reply 68 of 163
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Hodar View Post


    Ummm - Jailbreaking MY iPhone is perfectly LEGAL.



    Denying me access to iBooks that I have paid for, is theft.



    Not all Jailbreakers are thieves, I know several jailbroken phones - and NOT ONE of them use stolen Apps.



    I'd wager that 95% of Jailbreakers go to the effort, because of MyWi. MyWi simply turns on a function that is built into the iPhone, and is turned off by the cell provider. The Cell provider has opted to charge $20/month to enable something my phone has always been able to do. How I consume my 2 GB is MY business - not my cell phone providers.



    Would anyone tolerate a $20/month surcharge to use your speakerphone?



    This is the second post that you have said that you do not follow the terms of service that you agreed to when you signed the contract with AT&T. So, you are in obvious violation of your agreement and yet you pretend not to be one of the people that are breaking the rules.



    You do not get to decide "how you consume" your 2gb, the contract states how you get to.



    If you do not like what Apple does and deem AT&T's contract as not applicable to you, then buy a different phone on a different carrier!
  • Reply 69 of 163
    Let the whining begin.



    What possible justification is there for jail breaking in order to pirate a book? Yet, there are those who through tortured logic or by setting up ridiculously improbable hypotheticals will find a justification, or merely assert their right to "do whatever I want because I bought it."



    Others like to hack everything as some climb a mountain: "just because it's there."
  • Reply 70 of 163
    tofinotofino Posts: 697member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Hodar View Post


    snip



    In the meanwhile, all my future book purchases will be through Kindle. iBooks has a lot of polish - but Kindle doesn't deny me access to the books I have paid for. And when you have dropped over $100 on books - this is a big deal.



    Not only does Amazon have a history of denying customers access to already purchased books, they have gone even further and remotely removed said books from customers' kindles.
  • Reply 71 of 163
    jukesjukes Posts: 213member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Cinemagic View Post


    So jailbreaking is legal. I purchased books from Apple



    technically you bought a license to view digital content on up to 5 authorized devices which doesn't include jailbroken devices



    this is the wrench in the deal to buy digital content from apple



    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Cinemagic View Post


    and Apple has now made it impossible for me to read these books as long as I legally jailbreak. Well, now I'll simply buy from Amazon, use the Kindle reader (on the iPad) and piss on Apple's iBooks. And yes, jailbreaking IS legal. You need to read the statement from the US Government's Library of Congress. If it is not illegal, then it is legal. It is legal to do ANYTHING that is not specifically declared illegal (US Constitution). Unless you live in another country, it's not hazy at all. Now once jailbroken, it becomes easy to do illegal acts like use pirated software. I don't thing there's anyone that will contend that pirated software is legal or moral to use in any fashion. This ability is one reason Apple fights jailbreaking. Apple's desire to control 100% of the user experience is another.



    It is correct that Apple is under no obligation to cater to jailbroken devices. They can and do everything they can to block jailbreaking. My gripe right now is that I paid Apple for books. I paid Apple for my iPhone and iPad. By blocking me, I feel that Apple has stolen my money. I didn't steal any of their software, hardware or anything else. The two Cydia apps I have I also paid for. Cydia has not cheated me. But now Apple has cheated me. Allow me to get a refund for books I purchased through iBookstore and I'll be happy.



  • Reply 72 of 163
    As others have said, jailbreaking is not illegal. However, just as with a car or any other item you purchase, you can modify, soup it up any way you want. However, you are voiding your warranty. You can't just tell Ford, GM, Chrysler, whoever, that you demand that their cars have whatever feature you feel you can't live without and have them start adding it to their cars. You have the option to modify if you want, but it's at your risk. Buy Android if it bugs you so much. Most people enjoy their iPhones just as they are.The ease of use and security are important to most people. Are there things I might like on them? Possibly. But all in all I will take the security and ease of use. If it was that big a deal I would get a Droid.
  • Reply 73 of 163
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Robin Huber View Post


    Let the whining begin.



    What possible justification is there for jail breaking in order to pirate a book? Yet, there are those who through tortured logic or by setting up ridiculously improbable hypotheticals will find a justification, or merely assert their right to "do whatever I want because I bought it."



    Others like to hack everything as some climb a mountain: "just because it's there."



    One jailbroken app I use is iBlacklist. My cell phone is my primary phone. Unfortunately for me, telemarketers have my number. A few have refused to take me off their list and I get calls all the time. AT&T won't block calls but will still charge me for the minutes used when these telemarketers do call. Apple doesn't allow me to block calls and they have not allowed any apps that do block calls into the app store. Jailbreaking and iBlacklist is the only solution if I want to be able to block telemarketers. And yes, I am on the Do Not Call Registry, which is useless. Maybe the user experience that Steve Jobs envisions is full of telemarketing. But for me, it's not. This is real, not a hypothetical. As for pirated books, there is no justification for that. But it seems that the anti-jailbreakers think that everyone who jailbreaks is out to pirate apps or steal something. Nothing could be further from the truth.
  • Reply 74 of 163
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jukes View Post


    technically you bought a license to view digital content on up to 5 authorized devices which doesn't include jailbroken devices



    this is the wrench in the deal to buy digital content from apple



    Yes, you are absolutely right. I did buy as you pointed out. I still feel cheated.
  • Reply 75 of 163
    Since developers get most of their sales and return on investment thru legitimate sales, they have to set their price accordingly. If there were no pirated copies, they could lower their price. In effect, legitimate purchasers are paying more so the pirates can freeload.
  • Reply 76 of 163
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post


    Agreed.



    Additionally, people mis-state things when they say that jailbreaking is "legal."



    Jailbreaking has not been declared "legal." What happened is that the decision was made that jailbreaking is "not illegal" (provided certain conditions prevail). It may not seem like it but that's a big difference. One of those conditions is that if the purpose of the jailbreaking is itself to break the law or assist in breaking the law, then it's no longer a legal thing to do.



    Jailbreaking is 100% legal. Using jailbreaking to steal is not. VCR's are legal. Taping a pay per view and selling it is not. Almost everything on the planet has an illegal use.



    http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/201...-jailbreaking/



    So Apple is within thier rights to withhold something new that has not been paid for to jailbreakers. Apple is not within thier rights to withhold something that has already been paid for.



    This makes it easy for me. I will not buy anymore Ibooks. I will go elsewhere and that is a shame, I have been a pretty loyal Itunes and Appstore purchaser.



    If Apple does a similar thing to app purchases they will totally blow the trust I have in them. I have never pirated an app and spent about $200 a year on apps.
  • Reply 77 of 163
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TomMcIn View Post


    Since developers get most of their sales and return on investment thru legitimate sales, they have to set their price accordingly. If there were no pirated copies, they could lower their price. In effect, legitimate purchasers are paying more so the pirates can freeload.



    The rate of Apple App store piracy is quite low overall. There are apparently some developers who say that on specific (probobly overpriced) apps they are high rates. Those people have not learned the lesson of the app store.



    There was a HUGE pent up demand for fairly priced software. Take me, I have spent very little on software (all kinds, desktop, phone) outside of my professional tools (Final Cut etc) before the Iphone app store.



    Now I spend real money buying $1-$10 apps. I would not have bought (or pirated) the same apps if they were $49. They are create (HUGE) demand with the lower prices, and bringing money into software that simply was not there to be had otherwise.
  • Reply 78 of 163
    jkgmjkgm Posts: 22member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jkichline View Post


    This isn't extortion. Jailbreaking in this manner compromises built-in security measures on the phone. iBooks uses this API to ensure that purchased books are legitimate and not stolen (the basis of capitalism). Jailbreaking isn't illegal, but if you are messing with the innards of the OS to do it, you can expect some things to not work. It would be like messing around with your car's engine to get more horsepower and then bitching about the manufacturer when you blow a head gasket. Apple simply provides no warranty for you if you are going to mess with your phone's OS.



    Your argument is more like the car manufacturer including a kill switch that automatically blows the head gasket when you tune the engine in a way they don't approve. This has gone beyond something accidentally being broken and is a direct intentional check that purposely disables functionality.



    Sorry, but your little straw man is blowing away. Whoops, there he went.
  • Reply 79 of 163
    finetunesfinetunes Posts: 2,065member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Prof. Peabody View Post


    Agreed.



    Additionally, people mis-state things when they say that jailbreaking is "legal."



    Jailbreaking has not been declared "legal." What happened is that the decision was made that jailbreaking is "not illegal" (provided certain conditions prevail). It may not seem like it but that's a big difference. One of those conditions is that if the purpose of the jailbreaking is itself to break the law or assist in breaking the law, then it's no longer a legal thing to do.



    In other words, if your intention when jailbreaking is to get around the DRM on the iBooks store, then it's 100% illegal. Jailbreaking as it currently exists enables one to get around the DRM on the contents of the iBooks store, therefore it enables an illegal act.



    All of this is admittedly quite hazy, but people going on about how "jailbreaking is 100% legal" and that this should somehow trump Apple's attempts to lock down content and so forth are being ignorant at best.



    Whether or not you agree with Apple's policy, you do have an agreement with Apple that you will comply with its terms.



    What the iPhone jailbreaking ruling means

    Quote:

    What does the Copyright Office's ruling mean?



    The short answer is that jailbreaking your iPhone or other mobile device will no longer violate a controversial federal copyright law called the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, or DMCA. Bypassing a manufacturer's protection mechanisms to allow "handsets to execute software applications" is now permitted.



    How does it affect iPhones specifically?



    Apple exercises greater control of its hardware and software than most of its competitors. Anyone remember last fall's court-ordered permanent injunction that Apple won against Psystar, which sold PCs with OS X pre-installed?



    On the iPhone, Apple restricts the software that can be loaded onto the device. Applications can be downloaded through the App Store, and to be included in the App Store, the program has to be vetted and approved by Apple....



    So does Apple have to support jailbreaking?



    Nope. Section 2(c) of the Apple iPhone Software License Agreement (PDF) bans any attempt to "modify" the iPhone software or to reverse-engineer it.



    What that means is that Apple can still legally -- if it chooses -- protect its phones from jailbreaking. The contract formed between the user and Apple (and the user and the wireless carrier) when the iPhone owner agrees to the user licensing agreement is binding, says Tom Sydnor, a senior fellow with the Progress and Freedom Foundation who takes an expansive view of copyright law.



    Just because the DMCA allows individuals an exemption to jailbreak their own phones, "it doesn't mean Apple or a carrier can't protect contractual restrictions to deal with it," Sydnor said. "Essentially the exemption says this is the sort of thing that falls in bounds of contracts."



    Apple could pursue breach of contract if someone jailbreaks their phone, or they could sue a person or company that creates jailbreak software for inducing someone to breach their contract with Apple. In other words, Sydnor said, "even if there was no DMCA, you could still be bound not to circumvent that technological protection."



    iPhone Software License Agreeement



    Read ¶2(c)
  • Reply 80 of 163
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post


    The law allows jailbreaking. It may be that what Apple has done is against the law. Time will tell.



    It looks like it is better to download a pirated copy of a book to view in iBooks rather than purchase the same title in the iBookstore.



    Jailbreaking may be legal, but Apple is under no obligation to give you access to protected content post-jailbreak.
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