Quicken for Mac 2007 being rebuilt to work with Mac OS X 10.7 Lion

Posted:
in Mac Software edited January 2014
Intuit announced to customers on Thursday that it plans to release a "re-engineered" version of Quicken for Mac 2007 that will be compatible with the latest version of Apple's Mac operating system, OS X 10.7 Lion.



A note from Aaron Forth, general manager of the Intuit Personal Finance Group, was sent out to customers Thursday, acknowledging that the company has "not always delivered" on its promise to deliver the best products to Mac customers. In particular, he was addressing the fact that Quicken for Mac 2007 does not have compatibility with Mac OS X 10.7 Lion.



"I understand the frustration this may have caused you and have put a team in place to address this issue," Forth wrote. "I am happy to announce that we will have a solution that makes Quicken 2007 for Mac 'Lion-compatible' by early spring."



Details on the forthcoming release are available on Intuit's support website with a newly published list of questions and answers. There users can request to be notified when more information becomes available.



Forth told customers that the Quicken for Mac 2007 solution is "just a first step" in winning back the confidence of customers. Intuit is also expanding its development team to better support Mac users.







"I understand we have a way to go, but I wanted to start by communicating our commitment to Mac and look forward to sharing the details with you as they emerge," he said.



Intuit last overhauled Quicken for Mac with Quicken Essentials, released in early 2010. But its latest efforts aim to support legacy customers, who have been locked out from Quicken for Mac 2007 since Apple launched Lion in July.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 64
    Didn't they make a 2012? Why didn't they just make that one work instead of what sounds like a repackaging of the exact same stuff from four years ago?
  • Reply 2 of 64
    Because Intuit discontinued development of Quicken for Mac.



    Those programmers are working on other things (Quicken Essentials, QuickBooks, TurboTax, Mint.com, whatever). They can't really call it Quicken 2012 if it has zero new features.



    The work that Intuit is doing is to incorporate the Rosetta technology to get this old Carbon PPC code to run on Lion, something that Apple had deprecated. Oh, and by the way, the code for Quicken 2007 is actually five years old, not four. It came out in 2006.



    It's not like Intuit forgot about this product, they deliberately end of lifed it. At the time, they already knew that Carbon was being replaced by Cocoa and that the transition from PPC to Intel architecture would mean the PPC support would eventually end. Hence, they decided to rewrite the application from scratch, to be called Quicken Essentials. Sadly, it looks like Intuit did not put in enough resources and started with the rewrite way too late. It was released a year or two behind schedule and in a half-baked state where much key functionality was missing.
  • Reply 3 of 64
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 6,516member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cvaldes1831 View Post


    Because Intuit discontinued development of Quicken for Mac.



    Those programmers are working on other things (Quicken Essentials, QuickBooks, TurboTax, Mint.com, whatever). They can't really call it Quicken 2012 if it has zero new features.



    Just my guess that Rosetta is involved somehow. Maybe Apple licensed it to Intuit for just this one time?
  • Reply 4 of 64
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by cvaldes1831 View Post


    Because Intuit discontinued development of Quicken for Mac.



    I see. Shame, really.
  • Reply 5 of 64
    joshajosha Posts: 901member
    Too bad Intuit, I've moved on.

    Your lack of continuing Mac support is a terrible reflection on Intuit.

    As far as I'm concerned you may as well forget the Mac forever, I have better alternatives now.
  • Reply 6 of 64
    sdw2001sdw2001 Posts: 16,907member
    They know it's almost 2012, right?
  • Reply 7 of 64
    Quicken has a lot to go to achieve parity with the Windows version. Until then, there are other alternatives, all of which are better than 2007. It's hard to believe the (ex?) CEO is on Apple's Board when they cannot deal with Mac. Seems he should be gone - a number of years ago. They need to look to the future. Intuit certainly is not.
  • Reply 8 of 64
    dave k.dave k. Posts: 1,306member
    I still can't understand why this site still reports anything from Intuit.
  • Reply 9 of 64
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post


    Just my guess that Rosetta is involved somehow. Maybe Apple licensed it to Intuit for just this one time?



    Yes, there were rumors of it back in June.
  • Reply 10 of 64
    elrothelroth Posts: 1,201member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by lkrupp View Post


    Just my guess that Rosetta is involved somehow. Maybe Apple licensed it to Intuit for just this one time?



    Apple doesn't own Rosetta - they licensed it from whoever has the rights. I don't know why they couldn't (wouldn't?) add it to Lion.
  • Reply 11 of 64
    tinktink Posts: 395member
    : x1,000,000,000,000,000





  • Reply 12 of 64
    Or Apple could just give us Rosetta for Lion and solve a lot of problems.



    EDIT: Or screw Apple, why doesn't the company that owns Rosetta just release it for Lion?
  • Reply 13 of 64
    Meh, I used to use Quicken, I switched to Moneydance and haven't looked back. I'm very pleased with them and more than happy to give them free advertising. Their mobile app is awesome as well.
  • Reply 14 of 64
    tinktink Posts: 395member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post




    A note ... acknowledging that the company has "not always delivered" on its promise to deliver the best products to Mac customers....

    ......

    "I understand the frustration this may have caused you and have put a team in place to address this issue," ........



    "I understand we have a way to go, but I ........[ View this article at AppleInsider.com ][/c]



    bla bla bla bla bla bla bla bla bla



  • Reply 15 of 64
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by NotRs View Post


    Or Apple could just give us Rosetta for Lion and solve a lot of problems.



    EDIT: Or screw Apple, why doesn't the company that owns Rosetta just release it for Lion?



    As an AAPL shareholder, I don't want Apple squandering their precious engineering resources on maintaining Rosetta.



    Let Intuit deal with it. After all, they knew about the whole transition and fumbled the ball. If another company licensed Rosetta to Apple, they might have a stab at it, but you can't keep the patience on a respirator forever.



    There are a number of paths to the future, but Quicken for Mac (in the form of the 2007 code) is dead. Intuit has to really improve Quicken Essentials for Mac, improve Mint.com's investment tracking functionality, or see more Mac-based Quicken users go to the competition (like iBank).
  • Reply 16 of 64
    All we need from Quicken is for it to have the exact same features as its Windows counterpart, and to work with all files interchangeably.



    It's obvious, I know.
  • Reply 17 of 64
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by elroth View Post


    Apple doesn't own Rosetta - they licensed it from whoever has the rights. I don't know why they couldn't (wouldn't?) add it to Lion.



    I don't think this is true. They may licence the underlying technology and they certainly didn't invent that tech, but the product itself is made by and distributed by Apple.



    The reasons they wouldn't add it to Lion are obvious.

    Whether they could or not or how hard it would be I don't know.
  • Reply 18 of 64
    Intuit...worst company by far for Mac loyaty. Even beats Adobe.
  • Reply 19 of 64
    I was a longtime Quicken for Window user -- last version was 2006. Although never in love with the Quicken user interface, it worked well for me. And I still have it on my virtual Windows XP instance on my Mac.



    If there had been a decent Quicken for the Mac, I would have bought it. I looked at Quicken Essentials for Mac -- it would not have worked for me.



    I am using iBank now.



    iBank works well enough -- but it does not have all the features that I used in Quicken -- like using both a classification AND a category on a transaction.



    And the investment portfolio stuff in iBank is also less full featured.



    iBank reconciling still has bugs -- but better than before.



    And, while iBank has made muchas muchas improvement in performance, there are still times when it is slow.



    At this point, I would say iBank is "adequate." But even if Intuit came out with a great product, I can't see myself migrating back to Quicken after all this time.
  • Reply 20 of 64
    Too late, we've already switched to iBank with no intention of going back to Quicken.
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