New Deux Ex game for iOS hobbles gameplay if device is jailbroken

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  • Reply 41 of 81
    pendergastpendergast Posts: 1,358member
    Marvin wrote: »
    Unlocking is a separate thing from jailbreaking. You can buy unlocked iPhones without them being jailbroken.

    Regardless of what individuals use jailbreaking for, the very fact that it's jailbroken allows the user to install a stolen copy of the game and this is an easy way of protecting against it.

    The game looks pretty good:


    [VIDEO]


    Some Android users are upset that they can't play it yet:

    http://kotaku.com/sorry-console-pc-gamers-but-the-mobile-deus-ex-is-damn-736609646

    "No need to apologize to us, they'll be more than sorry for all of us when they see the sales numbers. Deus Ex isn't big enough to be a big mover on a limited platform. MAYBE if it was on Android, Windows Phone, Vita and or 3DS."

    "It's coming to Andriod devices "soon", if you'll care to take a look at the end of the article."

    "That's actually my bad. it was originally announced as only an iPhone game. I guess we'll see then. It might not do too badly then. I just couldn't see it doing very well on just one mobile market vs. The majority of the market (Android and Apple combined.)"

    Yeah, it'll do much better in sales once it reaches all those laggy Android devices in about 6 months once they get it to work properly on all the different models and then just end up supporting the Samsung Galaxy. It's funny how the Android crowd is sort of like the Windows crowd but this time round, they bitch about Apple because they're the only one getting good software support. It used to be Windows users put down Apple's computers because of a lack of software support.

    They haven't even said a timeframe for the Android version. It would be funny if they end up cancelling their plans to port it over like many developers before them. The internet rage will be unbearable. Funny though.

    On the bright side, they can play with a Deus Ex theme until then:

    https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.ramazor.theme.freedea&hl=en

    It's a shame the iOS controllers aren't out yet. This would have been a great title to launch with them. Same with Knights of the Old Republic (another iOS exclusive).
    Very true, most reviews seem to be positive so far.

    PS for anyone who doesn't know already, the Steam Summer Sale has started. They have 700+ Mac games in there.

    Knights of the Old Republic is actually very good with a touch interface. No need for a controller.

    A FPS would definitely benefit from a controller, but it better have dual sticks.
  • Reply 42 of 81
    pendergastpendergast Posts: 1,358member
    milford wrote: »
    This is not how the law works.

    Actually I think that's how the law (exception really) reads.

    It's an exception to copyright law as long as it's not for illegal purposes.
  • Reply 43 of 81
    trrosentrrosen Posts: 31member
    Jailbreaking an iPad or touch is100% illegal no questions about it. Downloading a AppStore app to a jailbroken phone is 100% illegal. Once you jailbreak a device it is no longer an authorized Apple device.
  • Reply 44 of 81
    hill60hill60 Posts: 6,992member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by frxntier View Post





    That doesn't mean it's illegal.


     


    If you want to root your device then things not working as expected is your own responsibility.

  • Reply 45 of 81
    asciiascii Posts: 5,936member


    I love the Deus Ex franchise but won't be buying this unless it comes to a platform with a keyboard.


     


    And I believe in keeping my word. If you buy an iOS device and at some point click on an agreement that you will not jailbreak, then don't, simple as that. If, after buying, you don't like the restriction of only buying from the App Store, then return the device and buy something else, don't break your word.

  • Reply 46 of 81
    cigaarcigaar Posts: 1member


    Do you remember Dungeon Master back in the day? If you had a cracked version, the game would kill you with a huge fireball after a few minutes...


     


    It's a very clever way to protect your game against piracy, because a hacker needs to know what she's looking for before altering the right binary at the right place. And if the designer booby-traps the game in different places with different traps and different ways to check for the genuine nature of the game, it's eventually very effective against the diffusion of cracked versions.


     


    Ultimately, the Very Old Question about how much money is really being lost has to be asked... how many people will buy the game because it's not easely available for free?

  • Reply 47 of 81


    Why does everyone continually go on about this almost exclusively as a piracy issue? What you have done by jailbreaking a device is to alter the OS from the way Apple released it.


     


    I'm a developer and it's one thing to support my apps on Apple's certified official platform but if someone starts having support issues on a jailbroken device then how am I supposed to replicate their setup without jailbreaking my own device? In the Android world you may well have to support multiple versions of the OS but the high uptake rates for iOS releases means that as a developer I can test on only a few legitimate devices and be confident that my software works on a customer's device running those releases of iOS. Once a customer jailbreaks their device then on what iOS release am I now attempting to offer support? Is the bug in my software, Apple's software or some interaction of one or two of those with the effects of jailbreaking the device?


     


    Warn the customers (as the screen shot shows the the App page for Deus Ex clearly does, at least now!) and if people want to jailbreak their devices then they take a risk and definitely should not complain at all about anything that a developer does to provide quality support for a quality product.

  • Reply 48 of 81
    crowleycrowley Posts: 10,256member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by macslut View Post


    1) You don't have to jailbreak to pirate apps on an iOS device.  You've never had to.



     


    Huh?  How do you get the pirate apps onto your iPhone without jailbreaking?

  • Reply 49 of 81
    drealothdrealoth Posts: 79member


    Jailbreaking is explicitly, 100% legal (although it voids your warranty): http://www.cultofmac.com/52463/apples-official-response-to-dmca-jailbreak-exemption-it-voids-your-warranty/52463/


     


    There seems to be a lot of misinformation here about jailbreaking. There is a huge amount of functionality that jailbreaking has added to the device - multitasking, gestures, tethering, wallpapers (before Apple had them), live wallpapers, notification center (before Apple), widgets, access to the filesystem, etc.


     


    I've jailbroken every iOS device I've owned, but never pirated an app. Plus the jailbreak community is pretty great - lots of smart guys experimenting with cool technology.


     


    Anyway, I think what the developer is doing is pretty lame. No doubt a cracked version will be out soon (if it's not already), in which case the only people who lose out are the paying customers. If developers continue down this path, people will be forced to pirate, since it'll be their only way to get apps. Pirates will always get free apps. As a developer, you can't win that fight - so instead, try to keep your paying customers happy, and accept that people are going to pirate your software no matter what you do.

  • Reply 50 of 81
    solomansoloman Posts: 228member
    Marvin wrote: »
    Yeah, it'll do much better in sales once it reaches all those laggy Android devices in about 6 months once they get it to work properly on all the different models and then just end up supporting the Samsung Galaxy.

    I experience the opposite, I play the same exact games on my Galaxy Nexus and on my iPod Touch, and they run smooth on my Nexus yet lag considerably on my iPod.
  • Reply 51 of 81
    pendergastpendergast Posts: 1,358member
    soloman wrote: »
    I experience the opposite, I play the same exact games on my Galaxy Nexus and on my iPod Touch, and they run smooth on my Nexus yet lag considerably on my iPod.

    Your post makes no sense as he said they'd likely only end up supporting Galaxy devices. Also, it's irrelevant without specifying which generation of iPod you have.
  • Reply 52 of 81
    solomansoloman Posts: 228member
    pendergast wrote: »
    Your post makes no sense as he said they'd likely only end up supporting Galaxy devices. Also, it's irrelevant without specifying which generation of iPod you have.

    4th gen iPod Touch.
  • Reply 54 of 81
    relicrelic Posts: 4,735member
    trrosen wrote: »
    Jailbreaking an iPad or touch is100% illegal no questions about it. Downloading a AppStore app to a jailbroken phone is 100% illegal. Once you jailbreak a device it is no longer an authorized Apple device.

    Here is what Apple has to say about it;

    iOS is designed to be reliable and secure from the moment you turn on your device. Built-in security features protect against malware and viruses and help to secure access to personal information and corporate data. Unauthorized modifications to iOS ("jailbreaking") bypass security features and can cause numerous issues to the hacked iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch, including:

    Security vulnerabilities: Jailbreaking your device eliminates security layers designed to protect your personal information and your iOS device. With this security removed from your iOS device, hackers may steal your personal information, damage your device, attack your network, or introduce malware, spyware or viruses.

    Instability: Frequent and unexpected crashes of the device, crashes and freezes of built-in apps and third-party apps, and loss of data.

    Shortened battery life: The hacked software has caused an accelerated battery drain that shortens the operation of an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch on a single battery charge.

    Unreliable voice and data: Dropped calls, slow or unreliable data connections, and delayed or inaccurate location data.

    Disruption of services: Services such as Visual Voicemail, Weather, and Stocks have been disrupted or no longer work on the device. Additionally, third-party apps that use the Apple Push Notification Service have had difficulty receiving notifications or received notifications that were intended for a different hacked device. Other push-based services such as iCloud and Exchange have experienced problems synchronizing data with their respective servers.

    Inability to apply future software updates: Some unauthorized modifications have caused damage to iOS that is not repairable. This can result in the hacked iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch becoming permanently inoperable when a future Apple-supplied iOS update is installed.

    Apple strongly cautions against installing any software that hacks iOS. It is also important to note that unauthorized modification of iOS is a violation of the iOS end-user software license agreement and because of this, Apple may deny service for an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch that has installed any unauthorized software.


    ...and what the Library of Congress has to say -> https://s3.amazonaws.com/public-inspection.federalregister.gov/2012-26308.pdf

    I tried Jailbreaking my device a couple of times but made my device unstable so off it went. I don't see the appeal of hacking an iOS device, I own a Android tablet for those kind of shenanigans.
  • Reply 55 of 81
    relicrelic Posts: 4,735member
    Those who do have a Jailbroken device here is a work around. I'm surprised that they actually thought the lock out would actually keep people from using the game.

    Go to Cydia
    Look for a tweak called xCon
    Install it and re-spring the device.
    Run the game now.
    Voila!

    Okay if it doesn't work the first time, you might have to re-install the game to remove the jailbreak-detect data.
  • Reply 56 of 81
    relicrelic Posts: 4,735member
    crowley wrote: »
    Huh?  How do you get the pirate apps onto your iPhone without jailbreaking?

    You do it threw the bulk enterprise licensing technology, basically you assign the iOS device to another store that let's you use, well, less then credible sources. There are many of these stores available but I won't post any here because it's naughty.
  • Reply 57 of 81
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,790moderator
    I'm a developer and it's one thing to support my apps on Apple's certified official platform but if someone starts having support issues on a jailbroken device then how am I supposed to replicate their setup without jailbreaking my own device?

    You obviously don't have to support them. Why should a developer feel obliged to support every hacked firmware a customer decides to install? If someone hacks an XBox 360 to play 'backup' games and has issues, it's not up to the game publisher/developer to make it work. A portion of those people will have stolen the game anyway. Hardly anyone who jailbreaks their device to steal games would admit they steal games. Even people who steal them will claim to be an innocent victim and a legitimate customer and spread negative PR about the developer in order that the anti-piracy measures be removed so they can steal games more easily.

    Customers can complain about a developer purposely not supporting the iPad 1 or iPhone 3GS but the developer can choose what they want to support. If they don't want to support hacked firmwares, that's their choice.
    tape wrote:
    The number one reason for jailbreaking today remains the downloading of stolen copies of games

    Citation needed.

    Developers have to make an assumption one way or the other. If a significant number of people jailbreaking do so to pirate (there was an estimate in 2010 put it around 40% of jailbreakers) then they need a deterrent and putting these measures in is a deterrent because it means people who steal the game have to wait for it to be patched. Apple wants to deter customers from jailbreaking and this has a similar effect.

    There are very few legitimate reasons for jailbreaking these days. Avoiding paying for tethering certainly isn't one nor is avoiding paying Apple the developer fee.

    If you google for Appcake, you can see the charts for downloads.

    Modern Combat 4 has 320,000 downloads, Tom Tom 394,000 (this is a $100 app), Navigon 353,000 ($80 app). Modern Combat 4 only came out last month. Deus Ex is under 3,000 just now because it doesn't work.

    Angry Birds has 726,000 downloads and it costs $0.99. That's one store out of maybe 3 or 4 main ones. One of the latest jailbreaks topped 7 million downloads. A 40% piracy rate seems reasonable when the numbers are split between the stores. Even if the percentage is lower, the numbers are significant. The Tom Tom app represents ~$40m. Of course it may not be lost revenue if they wouldn't have bought it but some of them would have if they didn't have the option to steal it.
    frxntier wrote:
    'it's illegal to own a car if the sole purpose of that car is to assist with bank robberies.' The logic doesn't fly.

    That logic actually does fly to an extent. People who have been charged with illegal use of computers get banned from using computers. Computers aren't banned for everyone but the measures used in a given scenario are ones that solve the problem. Developers clamping down on jailbreakers will act as a deterrent for both jailbreaking and piracy. The most committed will see it as a challenge but the people who could take it or leave it will see it as nuisance and stop doing it. That shrinks the target audience for those profiting from the piracy.
    d4njvrzf wrote:
    Are many game studios planning to cease development for Mac and PC because those platforms let one install programs from any source?

    That question doesn't really apply directly to this scenario. The developer hasn't ceased development for anything. As it happens though, many developers do in fact go console exclusive and often cite PC piracy as a reason.
    drealoth wrote:
    I've jailbroken every iOS device I've owned, but never pirated an app.
    Anyway, I think what the developer is doing is pretty lame. No doubt a cracked version will be out soon (if it's not already), in which case the only people who lose out are the paying customers. If developers continue down this path, people will be forced to pirate, since it'll be their only way to get apps.

    This is what many jailbreakers say: 'I've never pirated', 'the developers will learn their lesson', 'customers will have to steal'. The solution for customers is simple: install an Apple-approved firmware.
  • Reply 58 of 81
    Uh, typo in multiple places... It's Deu**S** Ex, not Deux Ex.
  • Reply 59 of 81
    relicrelic Posts: 4,735member
    Marvin wrote: »
    This is what many jailbreakers say: 'I've never pirated', 'the developers will learn their lesson', 'customers will have to steal'. The solution for customers is simple: install an Apple-approved firmware.

    Actually like I stated above there is a much easier ways of installing pirated apps in your iPad, you don't need to Jailbreak it. Most people who Jailbreak do so to add features like a filemanager, fast toogles to disable things like Wifi and Bluetooth, turn on full multitasking (run apps in the background) for all of your apps not just the Apple approved ones, install Unix software like Perl, PHP and Pyhthon, heck even a LAMP server, create folders in folders which is great for categories, install the iSwipe keyboard, activate hotspot without paying for it, even change the default web browser, the list goes on and on.
  • Reply 60 of 81
    macslutmacslut Posts: 514member

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by KiltedGreen View Post


    Why does everyone continually go on about this almost exclusively as a piracy issue? What you have done by jailbreaking a device is to alter the OS from the way Apple released it.


     


    I'm a developer and it's one thing to support my apps on Apple's certified official platform but if someone starts having support issues on a jailbroken device then how am I supposed to replicate their setup without jailbreaking my own device? [snip]


     


    Warn the customers (as the screen shot shows the the App page for Deus Ex clearly does, at least now!) and if people want to jailbreak their devices then they take a risk and definitely should not complain at all about anything that a developer does to provide quality support for a quality product.



     


    What they did with this game was different from what you're describing.  In this case, it's not a question of the game not working on jailbroken devices, but rather the app checks to see if the game is jailbroken and then notifies the user that a feature has been disabled.  They are intentionally disabling it.  This really isn't anything new, a lot of apps have tried this, and all have failed.  Heck, they even failed with this one as there was already a tweak for it before this story was published.  The article may have just as well been "If you haven't already updated xCon, be sure to do so before playing Deus Ex".


     


    They've done this in a misguided attempt to thwart piracy/cheats.  However both piracy and cheating can be accomplished without jailbreaking, and the jailbreak community is smart enough to get around this.  To thwart cheats, they should encrypt their plists (and possibly other files).  To thwart piracy, provide a good app at a decent price, with a trial version, update frequently, and hope for the best (app piracy is waaaay down these days).


     


    As a developer, I understand where you're coming from in terms of not wanting to support the chaos of jailbroken system configurations.  I'm not alone, I think the overwhelming majority of people in the jailbreak community understand and accept this.  I have a lot of iOS devices, some jailbroken, some not.  Often I'll encounter a problem that is not jailbreak related, but has a jailbreak fix, or because I'm jailbroken I'm able to diagnose the problem.  There are a lot of idiots who jailbreak and do stupid things only to then say "it was too unstable so I restored", but if you spend some time to learn what you're doing, you can end up with a much better system.

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