WSJ reaffirms 'iPhone 5S' to boast fingerprint sensor, 'iPhone 5C' left without

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 59
    dreyfus2dreyfus2 Posts: 1,070member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Mikeelive View Post





    With the nose also?

     

    I hope, figuratively, that this discussion does not go any deeper.

  • Reply 22 of 59
    iaeeniaeen Posts: 588member
    kalvin1632 wrote: »
    I'd be happy with the phone if the main purpose of the fingerprint reader was not connected to identity or wallets at all.

    For me, it would be great if I could register different functions to each of my fingers. For example, touching the sensor with my left index finger should unlock the phone and go directly to the camera application. Another finger would immediately call my parter.

    That would be a killer application - and sell phones.

    Anyone else agree?

    Sounds like a gimmick to me. Maybe we'll see it on an android device, but I would be shocked to see it on an iPhone.

    Security OTOH is a universally useful feature even for people who don't appreciate it.
  • Reply 23 of 59
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,414member
    If Tim Cook is smart, he'll introduce the 5C as "c is for color, china and cheap" and take the wind out of the competitions sails right off the bat. Own it.
  • Reply 24 of 59
    Wasn't a few Walmarts experimenting with using an iPhone to scan items while shopping and at check out earlier this year?
  • Reply 25 of 59
    I'm just not excited in the least to have a fingerprint scanner on my phone, much less available to anyone who is able to hack phones. What is it really good for? I don't find it that bothersome to enter a pin. I almost do it subconsciously now anyway. Most of the banks in my area stopped using fingerprinting or scanning long ago. Not to be obtuse, but what's the point?

    There has to be a lot more to it.
    My wild guess? If the new home button really is some kind of sapphire lens material, it could be a special type of gesture sensing camera that is much better at its' job than the front facing camera is. That would be progress. That would cause some excitement and wonder. Fingerprint sensor? Meh- give me the cheap one in that case.
  • Reply 26 of 59
    Willfully ignorant repost crap.

    Was new to me. What's old is you being an asshole.
  • Reply 27 of 59

    What about the in-display fingerprint sensor?

     

    Will that technology be used as well in the iPhone 5S ?

     

    http://appleinsider.com/articles/13/07/18/apple-details-in-display-fingerprint-sensor-tech-in-patent-filing-from-authentec-cofounder

  • Reply 28 of 59
    Deleted, never mind :/
  • Reply 29 of 59
    dunksdunks Posts: 1,240member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Shogun View Post



    I thought both would have the sensor if they were going to release an iWallet, on the logic that Apple would get a slice of all transactions and want as many devices to have the ability as possible. Now I'm thinking the iWallet comes next year.

     

    Why would Apple build the next tent-pole, premium feature into their budget handset? They want to sell you an iPhone, but, given the choice, they would prefer to sell you an iPhone 5S.

     

    This sets them up for next year where they may offer iPhone 5 (2 colours, no scanner), iPhone 5S (4 colours, scanner) and a newly designed iPhone 6 (multiple colours, scanner and more).

     

    iWallet functionality is definitely on the roadmap but likely won't arrive immediately. If I was Apple I would debut the fingerprint scanner with a smaller set of limited features (like not having to enter passwords). Only when it's in the hands of many consumers and you have established trust in the system do you evolve it to take on broader roles, like real world transactions.



    There is a similar progression to every big feature Apple implements. Siri originally launched as a novelty and a timesaver for a small set of tasks. Siri's real magic will be in enticing developers to present application data in a standardised format that can be recognised by an AI. Since Apple avoided a centralised file system all your data has a context. Siri could eventually become the AI mechanism by which contextual information can be collated and compared between apps through a natural language/logic interface. This would represent a genuine revelation in personal computing. Noone is better positioned to leverage this than Apple.

  • Reply 30 of 59
    dreyfus2 wrote: »
    rogifan wrote: »
    I hope we get more than just unlocking the device. I'd love for there to be a surprise, something that didnt leak out that has people pleasantly surprised.


    I think it is totally possible that some things might come with point updates to iOS 7, at least for tablets they really seem to struggle a bit getting it ready.

    By having the features in a maintained release it allows Apple to obscure the APIs from developers. This allows Tim to get his big launch on stage with something that secret, and he can announce that it is coming soon.
  • Reply 31 of 59
    this is a load of crap.. not happening.
  • Reply 32 of 59
    dunksdunks Posts: 1,240member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by spiced View Post



    I think the silver ring is a metallic conductor that acts to detect finger press for HOME so to replace the short life span ductile button used on all existing iPhones and may as well roll out to iPads and iPods. Or might be like all who thinks its a RF field antenna to generate RF to detect finger print....or it could be use as both which could be hell for those who thinks of copying!

    The ring delivers a small charge to the skin's surface to assist the sensor with imaging the fingerprint. It's a circle so it will work the same in any device orientation.



    Apple won't replace a hardware home button with a capacitive button. They may use it to recognise a touch event in addition to a press event but it won't replace it a press event. They tried that with the 3rd generation iPod and we never saw it again. Even their track-pads are click-able. I've never experienced any home button problems with any of the iOS devices I've owned so I contest your assumption that they have a short lifespan.

  • Reply 33 of 59
    dunksdunks Posts: 1,240member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by blackbook View Post

     

     

    I was thinking something similar. What if the new FP sensing home button is a capacitive touch button and not a physical button?

     

    That would help the whole device last longer.


     

    It would also be a terrible idea because capacitive buttons get activated accidentally. ALL. THE. FREAKING. TIME.

     

    Do you not already press the dictation button on the keyboard when trying to access numbers multiple times a day already?

  • Reply 34 of 59
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by NasserAE View Post

     

    So "S" is for Security and "C" for Color.


    S is for SAME.. C is for CRAP.

  • Reply 35 of 59
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Shogun View Post



    I thought both would have the sensor if they were going to release an iWallet, on the logic that Apple would get a slice of all transactions and want as many devices to have the ability as possible. Now I'm thinking the iWallet comes next year.

     

    I thought the same.  The daringfireball referenced article today on the demand curve was telling in the other side...  how do you differentiate your 'high value' phone from your lower value phones, especially when released in parallel.

     

    My guess is the high end iPhone and iPad(s) will have it for a while.   While mobile shopping is cool, Internet banking requires this now (well, 2 years ago).     Once you get people used to doing this for banking/financial apps, then it will drive to ecommerce apps, and then the experience will be 'expected and understood.'  At that point, the 'point to pay' apps will be considered weak sauce unless they use the technology and the interaction experience (sort of like multitouch....  your fingers will just know what to do).

     

    iwallet?  I predict it's passbook2.  The combo platter of coupons/gift cards/and credit/debit cards... and/or your AppleID backed account.  

  • Reply 36 of 59
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Kalvin1632 View Post



    I'd be happy with the phone if the main purpose of the fingerprint reader was not connected to identity or wallets at all.



    For me, it would be great if I could register different functions to each of my fingers. For example, touching the sensor with my left index finger should unlock the phone and go directly to the camera application. Another finger would immediately call my parter.



    That would be a killer application - and sell phones.



    Anyone else agree?

     

    appears the answer is no.

  • Reply 37 of 59
    N
  • Reply 38 of 59
    I'm a little confused on how iwallet will work. Whether you use Bluetooth or NFC technology, if the store doesn't have a wireless point of sales, then it wouldn't work. Would it not be a better idea for a person To scan their fingerprint and then scan their actual screen with a barcode on it? I'm just not sure how long it would take for all the store in the USA to get wireless Point of sales hardware.
  • Reply 39 of 59

    New high-res version of the iPhone 5S box picture we've seen before.

     

  • Reply 40 of 59
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by DethByUngaBunga View Post

     

     

    "C" is for Cheap  ;)

     

    What I want to know is this:  

    Will PersonA (an iPhone 5S user) be able to pick up PersonB's iPhone 5S and easily access his/her (PersonA's) iCloud data?

     

    This would obviously require some portion of fingerprint data be stored on the iCloud servers, but it would be almost magic if people could hotswap on the same phone using just their finger.


     

    it's not obvious... in fact as pointed out... it's flat wrong.

     

    First off, the 'owner' of the phone (personB) must provision this access to her phone, which will require personB to log in, authenticate (with a fingerprint) to the device, and say "allow this person to access my phone with the privilege of a local profile [registered AppleID mapped local app data storage]"  Then Person A would be prompted in a secure manner [ any attempt to leave will bring the phone to the lock screen of personB] to enter there AppleID and password, and once verified, a fingerprint on the local device is registered [and a hash of that combo is sent to Apple], and a local 'unlock' password is requested.

     

    as to your real desire, In the end, Apple may in the future support multiple profiles on each phone, using icloud as a backing store... but that means each app needs to sync to the iCloud to do so.   

     

    And that's why I think the new iPads will have this feature...  because, multiple profiles on an iPad makes so much more sense in a family setting or corporate/shared setting.

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