Steve Jobs' childhood home could become protected historical site

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 2014
Steve Jobs is widely acknowledged to have helped change the way much of the world interact with computers, and now the childhood home of the late Apple co-founder could become a historically preserved site in order to honor his accomplishments.



Steve Jobs' family home, the location where he took part in the construction of the first Apple computer, may soon become a protected historical site, according to CNN. The Lost Altos Historical Commission is looking to conduct a "historic property evaluation" on the property, with a decision to follow soon after.

The Los Altos location, at 2066 Crist Drive, would see preservation if the commission decides it is worth of the historical site designation. Jobs moved to the house with his foster parents as a 7th grader and lived there through high school.

Jobs and Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak built the first 50 Apple 1 computers in the house's garage before selling them to Paul Terrell's Byte Shop in Mountain View, Calif., for $500 a piece.

The three-bedroom, two-bathroom ranch-style house was built in 1952. It has a current estimated value of $1.5 million.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 39

    Could? Should. He’s responsible in a huge way for the state of modern technology.

  • Reply 2 of 39
    Hope to see a garage sale there!
  • Reply 3 of 39
    I believe this to be a very responsible action for the childhood home of an individual that literally changed the world and the course of human history. Damn straight, it should be protected.
  • Reply 4 of 39
    drblankdrblank Posts: 3,383member
    Who owns the place now? I'm sure they don't really want Lookie Lou's driving by all of the time.
  • Reply 5 of 39

    Cue the idiots spewing about a "Realty Distortion Field," now :)

  • Reply 6 of 39

    I certainly think it should be preserved.  Considering in the biography, Jobs said that his design aesthetic was influenced by growing up in an Eichler home (ignoring the fact that this is clearly not an Eichler home), would suggest that something that played a part in the thought processes of a man who influenced design so much should be considered important.

     

    Until right now, when I Googled it, I had no idea where it was.  I didn't realize that every time I go to meet my wife at her work, I'm driving past where Jobs grew up!

  • Reply 7 of 39

    Why?

  • Reply 8 of 39
    Why?

    Because its the place Steve Jobs grew up.
  • Reply 9 of 39
    jungmarkjungmark Posts: 6,924member
    barcode wrote: »
    Because its the place Steve Jobs grew up.

    Well it's the place where Apple I started.
  • Reply 10 of 39

    Of course it should be. Just as Thomas Edison's home is.

  • Reply 11 of 39
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member

    Apple should buy it.

  • Reply 12 of 39
    They should also preserve the back seat of the clown car where Steve Ballmer was conceived.
  • Reply 13 of 39
    malaxmalax Posts: 1,598member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mstone View Post

     

    Apple should buy it.


     

    Good point.

     

    I think it's ironic that Jobs' house will be protected after the long drawn out, ugly battle he personally had where he was prevented from demolishing a protected building.

     

    And $1.5M for a 1950 ranch-style house?  Wow, the silicon valley real estate did alright surviving the housing crash apparently.

  • Reply 14 of 39
    19831983 Posts: 1,225member
    Quote:


     Steve Jobs' family home, the location where he took part in the construction of the first Apple computer, may soon become a protected historical site.


    I thought it already was! Really surprised it isn't yet...but it seems like its going to be, so good!

  • Reply 15 of 39

    is it their plans to kick out the current owners since it is now a landmark 

  • Reply 16 of 39
    "It has a current estimated value of $1.5 million."

    Gotta love the Bay Area.

    I have a lot of friends who have relocated here from and are shocked, floored, and flabbergasted, when they go out house hunting. They come from areas where the home above would cost $150,000, not $1,500,000, and would be torn down immediately to make way for a new one.
  • Reply 17 of 39
    drblank wrote: »
    Who owns the place now? I'm sure they don't really want Lookie Lou's driving by all of the time.

    Yea I'm wondering the same thing?
  • Reply 18 of 39
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by jungmark View Post





    Well it's the place where Apple I started.

    I don't mean to sound snarky or anything but generally when I think of a "Historic Place" I think of places like Gettysburg, Lexington&Concord, Washington's Birthplace etc.

     

    Don't get me wrong, I think it's pretty cool and all, it's generally just not something I would think of as "Historic" as of yet.

  • Reply 19 of 39
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by malax View Post

     

    I think it's ironic that Jobs' house will be protected after the long drawn out, ugly battle he personally had where he was prevented from demolishing a protected building.


    Not really 'ironic'. It is the same exact thing. No one will even be able to install a compact fluorescent light bulb in that house without a permit from city hall.

  • Reply 20 of 39
    I drove by years ago and took a couple of photos. It still had a TV antenna sticking up from the ridge of the roof then.

    I also took photos of the handsome two-story house with the garage in the back where William Hewlett and David Packard built their first audio oscillator. It has a large brass plaque out front commemorating it as the "Birthplace of Silicon Valley" and marking it as California Registered Historical Landmark No. 976.

    Steve Job's home where the first Apple computers were built certainly deserves the same respect.
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