NBA's Portland Trail Blazers use Apple's iPad in-game to make real-time adjustments

Posted:
in iPad edited January 2014
In their 102-91 victory over the New York Knicks on Monday, the Portland Trail Blazers were seen using iPads on the bench to study in-game footage, which players say helped carry the team to its eleventh consecutive win.

Matthews
Portland Trail Blazers shooting guard Wesley Matthews. | Source: NBA.com


According to a report from Blazer's Edge, multiple players on the team are spending their time on the bench reviewing game tape on Apple's iPad as they look to get a leg up on opponents.

The publication notes Damian Lillard, Wesley Matthews, Nicolas Batum and LaMarcus Aldridge all use iPads during games to study film and make quick adjustments.

"It does [help] because you get to see it [again], and in the game everything happens so fast," Matthews said. "You ask yourself, 'Did I rush it? I felt like I rushed it.' [The video can tell me] when I'm in that same situation -- off a flare screen, when Nic [Batum] passes over the top -- [if] I have more time to get the shot off or [if] I have to shoot it at that speed again. Or, could I have driven it?"

Matthews went on to say that the iPad allows him to study both aspects of his game. On offense, the shooting guard looks at his form and whether there were options he didn't see on court. On defense, he studies his stance, positioning on opponents and how players get in scores.

It is unclear what app the Blazers are using to review footage, but the system is apparently near real-time. Starting players can watch clips from their first rotation by the time they hit the bench, shaving minutes off adjustments normally made during halftime.

Players are also using Apple's tablet to review footage post-game, where a more thorough analysis can be rendered, to be put into action at the next game.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 15
    Does anyone know if government organizations and/or companies are able to access their own proprietary version of an App Store, or are they able to access 'hidden apps' in the store that are not available or viewable by the general public? Or is the App Store the single and only way to see and access all applications? Perhaps Portland's team has had an application specifically designed for them, and the Application is unavailable for access by the general public. Just a guess.
  • Reply 2 of 15
    jungmarkjungmark Posts: 6,924member
    Fools. Don't they know they need a real keyboard!!!! /s
  • Reply 3 of 15

    Yes, enterprises (e.g. businesses and government organizations) can set up their own Enterprise App Stores for distributing their own apps to their employees.

  • Reply 4 of 15
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by GregLomow View Post

     

    Yes, enterprises (e.g. businesses and government organizations) can set up their own Enterprise App Stores for distributing their own apps to their employees.


     

    Yes, there's two ways to do it. The in-house app program lets an organization write and distribute their apps to their own devices. It is almost identical to developer phones, Apple provides a provisioning profile on to your company's phones and you can load apps signed by that profile. Apple doesn't approve or ever sees the app.

     

    The second way is the B2B program. Here the app goes through Apple and is approved, but can only be sold or distributed to specific companies. The companies you select buy the app through the volume purchase program.

  • Reply 5 of 15
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,002member
    Does anyone know if government organizations and/or companies are able to access their own proprietary version of an App Store, or are they able to access 'hidden apps' in the store that are not available or viewable by the general public? Or is the App Store the single and only way to see and access all applications? Perhaps Portland's team has had an application specifically designed for them, and the Application is unavailable for access by the general public. Just a guess.



    https://developer.apple.com/programs/ios/enterprise/

    I'm starting to think that you just might be a analog guy in a digital world. :lol:
  • Reply 6 of 15
    Sorry for my ignorance! I should never have asked. I'm such an idiot!
  • Reply 7 of 15
    The app is probably from Sportscode. We've been using this for the past two years.
  • Reply 8 of 15
    drblankdrblank Posts: 3,383member
    Ballmer must be fuming about now..... I'm sure there is actual steam being produced at the top of Ballmer's head.
  • Reply 9 of 15
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,002member
    Sorry for my ignorance! I should never have asked. I'm such an idiot!

    No worries, I asked the same question last year :lol:
  • Reply 10 of 15
    The best thing about this story is that the Blazers are owned by Paul Allen, co-founder of Microsoft. That they are not using surface tablets is even more telling. Paul regularly sits just below the basket on the game floor; Bill Gates is also with him from time to time.
  • Reply 11 of 15
    Someone forgot to close their html tag?
  • Reply 12 of 15

    Quote:


    Originally Posted by dasanman69 View Post





    https://developer.apple.com/programs/ios/enterprise/



    I'm starting to think that you just might be a analog guy in a digital world. image

     

    Is that a Joe Walsh reference? Man I wished that song didn't make him seem 90.

  • Reply 13 of 15

    This is cool. How long before another Team cries foul?! Isn't Samsung sponsoring some sort of tablet usage with the NBA?

  • Reply 14 of 15
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,002member
    rahhbriley wrote: »
    Quote:

    Is that a Joe Walsh reference? Man I wished that song didn't make him seem 90.

    Yes it is. Good catch.
  • Reply 15 of 15
    konqerror wrote: »
    Yes, there's two ways to do it. The in-house app program lets an organization write and distribute their apps to their own devices. It is almost identical to developer phones, Apple provides a provisioning profile on to your company's phones and you can load apps signed by that profile. Apple doesn't approve or ever sees the app.

    The second way is the B2B program. Here the app goes through Apple and is approved, but can only be sold or distributed to specific companies. The companies you select buy the app through the volume purchase program.

    There’s a third way, which doesn’t involve setting up formal distribution or programs. Just drag and drop an app to iTunes, then synch your iOS device (make sure the new app is selected for installing onto the device).

    I learned this while working on contract for a smaller company (15 people in-house) who develops music software, and they were building a free iOS app to interact with it. I did product testing for them, and the common way to distribute the iOS app betas to the beta testers was the app itself attached to email. Just drag and drop from email to iTunes, and voila. It was updated next time you synched.

    Of course, this didn’t involve an IT department, or have other Enterprise-level controls (desirable in larger organizations), but it IS a third way! :)
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