Apple releases Xcode 6.3.1, fixing 'critical issues' related to debugging and more

Posted:
in General Discussion edited April 2015
Apple on Tuesday issued a minor update for Xcode, improving stability and fixing what the company said are "critical issues" associated with debugging, playgrounds, and Interface Builder.




Xcode 6.3.1 is now available to download from the Mac App Store. For new downloads, it's a 2.57-gigabyte install that requires OS X 10.10 or later.

Tuesday's release is a relatively minor update intended to squash bugs in the software. The last major update to Xcode arrived earlier this month in the form of Xcode 6.3, featuring new compilers for the Swift programming language, and software development kits for new hardware like the Force Touch trackpad found in the latest MacBooks.

The latest versions of Xcode also include a new crash reporting tool that works in concert with TestFlight reports to aggregate results in-app. A revised Organizer window also helps developers keep everything tidy.

Swift 1.2 includes its own improvements, including faster compile times, language refinements to "let" and "as," a standard library and a tool to help developers migrate software from Swift 1.1.

Developers looking to update their existing apps for iOS have until June 1 to support 64-bit processors and iOS 8. After that cut-off, updates built on code solely for legacy hardware and software will be rejected.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 25
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,311member
    Xcode. Be great when it's finished.
  • Reply 2 of 25
    auxioauxio Posts: 1,997member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by asdasd View Post



    Xcode. Be great when it's finished.



    Still wipes the floor with Android Studio

  • Reply 3 of 25
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by asdasd View Post



    Xcode. Be great when it's finished.



    Software that is actually used is never finished.  There are always new features that need to be added.

     

    And as someone who uses Xcode daily, I would say it's great already. Does it have some annoyances (ahem, bugs)? Sure.  But that doesn't take away that it's probably one of the best (if not the best) IDEs on any platform at this time.  I'll take Xcode (and it's bugs) over any other IDE these days.

  • Reply 4 of 25
    mstonemstone Posts: 11,510member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SmileyDude View Post

     



    Software that is actually used is never finished.  


    FCP and Aperture are finished /s

  • Reply 5 of 25
    auxioauxio Posts: 1,997member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by SmileyDude View Post

     

    And as someone who uses Xcode daily, I would say it's great already. Does it have some annoyances (ahem, bugs)? Sure.  But that doesn't take away that it's probably one of the best (if not the best) IDEs on any platform at this time.  I'll take Xcode (and it's bugs) over any other IDE these days.


     

    My biggest annoyance with Xcode these days is the fact that it seems to lose CPU cores over time and the only way to get them back is restarting it.  However, it's leaps and bounds ahead of the vast majority of IDEs.  Visual Studio is the only one I've used that comes close, and even it (being more mature) isn't as easy to use when it comes to doing performance profiling.  Instruments (high level) + dtrace (low level) are best-in-class profiling tools imo.

  • Reply 6 of 25
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,311member
    smileydude wrote: »

    Software that is actually used is never finished.  There are always new features that need to be added.

    And as someone who uses Xcode daily, I would say it's great already. Does it have some annoyances (ahem, bugs)? Sure.  But that doesn't take away that it's probably one of the best (if not the best) IDEs on any platform at this time.  I'll take Xcode (and it's bugs) over any other IDE these days.

    That's a longer way of saying "be great when it's finished".
  • Reply 7 of 25
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by asdasd View Post





    That's a longer way of saying "be great when it's finished".



    "Be great when it's finished" is another way of saying "be great when it's no longer used".

  • Reply 8 of 25
    nobodyynobodyy Posts: 377member

    OMG.

     

    6.3 was a pile of shit. It was literally given to developers as an incomplete piece of software.

     

    Quote:


     And as someone who uses Xcode daily, I would say it's great already. Does it have some annoyances (ahem, bugs)? Sure.  But that doesn't take away that it's probably one of the best (if not the best) IDEs on any platform at this time.  I'll take Xcode (and it's bugs) over any other IDE these days.


     

    Xcode has been a decent IDE through the ages, but 6.3 has been unusable for me.

  • Reply 9 of 25
    It desperately needs to automatically add the import statement for you like IntelliJ IDEA does. I've been programming in Java for ten years with IntelliJ and that feature rocks. Also it should have the re-factoring option to optimize imports. I believe Swift is a module language and should be able to support this feature. If I were Tim the first thing I would do is buy JetBrains and have all there re-factoring features ported to Xcode.
  • Reply 10 of 25
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    asdasd wrote: »
    Xcode. Be great when it's finished.

    its great now, and will be better when its finished. but then, as we already know, leading edge langauges are never "finished". the advancements in c# are continual as well, you just dont read about those.
  • Reply 11 of 25
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    smileydude wrote: »

    Software that is actually used is never finished.  There are always new features that need to be added.

    And as someone who uses Xcode daily, I would say it's great already. Does it have some annoyances (ahem, bugs)? Sure.  But that doesn't take away that it's probably one of the best (if not the best) IDEs on any platform at this time.  I'll take Xcode (and it's bugs) over any other IDE these days.

    im biased since im a windows-based enterprise dev by trade, but VS.NET is a pretty great IDE. the languages intellisense and whole package are pretty easy to get used to....
  • Reply 12 of 25
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    asdasd wrote: »
    That's a longer way of saying "be great when it's finished".

    nope. your snarky comment was intended to imply that Swift isn't great *today*, and that signs of its changing are proof of that. which is simply a stupid thing to believe. i doubt you write software, so i can excuse it tho....
  • Reply 13 of 25
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,311member
    nolamacguy wrote: »
    nope. your snarky comment was intended to imply that Swift isn't great *today*, and that signs of its changing are proof of that. which is simply a stupid thing to believe. i doubt you write software, so i can excuse it tho....

    I doubt you can read because I didn't say a thing about swift.

    I've been using Xcode since it wasn't Xcode.
  • Reply 14 of 25
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    asdasd wrote: »
    I doubt you can read because I didn't say a thing about swift.

    I've been using Xcode since it wasn't Xcode.

    here, then run this:

    dumbThingSaid.Replace("swift", "xcode");

    ...executes the same.
  • Reply 15 of 25
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,311member
    auxio wrote: »
    My biggest annoyance with Xcode these days is the fact that it seems to lose CPU cores over time and the only way to get them back is restarting it.  However, it's leaps and bounds ahead of the vast majority of IDEs.  Visual Studio is the only one I've used that comes close, and even it (being more mature) isn't as easy to use when it comes to doing performance profiling.  Instruments (high level) + dtrace (low level) are best-in-class profiling tools imo.

    VS is better and Xcode is pretty good when it works. My "snarky" comment refers to the frustrations about its cycle of stability and instability. It was super robust until 4.0 and then has gone in cycles of full and point releases regressing and stabilising. Rinse and repeat.

    6.2 was good.
  • Reply 16 of 25
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,311member
    nolamacguy wrote: »
    here, then run this:

    dumbThingSaid.Replace("swift", "xcode");

    ...executes the same.

    No it doesn't. I'm afraid you don't understand either English or logic.

    Didn't I have you on ignore?
  • Reply 17 of 25
    auxioauxio Posts: 1,997member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by asdasd View Post



    VS is better and Xcode is pretty good when it works. My "snarky" comment refers to the frustrations about its cycle of stability and instability. It was super robust until 4.0 and then has gone in cycles of full and point releases regressing and stabilising. Rinse and repeat.

     

    I've actually had the reverse experience with Xcode.  I've used it since the Project Builder days, and it was horrendous up until about version 3.2.  Version 4 was a rewrite, and so I found there were a fair number of bugs (plus code indexing was terrible).  After about version 5.2 it has been much better.  This is on a massive project with C++, Obj-C, and Obj-C++ code (plus a couple of smaller Obj-C projects which use C++ libraries).

     

    As for VS, everything just feels like it was designed by engineers (complex and only intuitive to the person who created it).  For example: Xperf vs Instruments -- there's not even a comparison in terms of ease of use.  But I think code indexing is still a bit better in VS than Xcode (though it's certainly gotten better).  And prop sheets (VS) definitely beat xcconfig files (Xcode) for cross-project build configuration management.  But other than that, Xcode is far more intuitive to use IMO.

  • Reply 18 of 25
    nolamacguynolamacguy Posts: 4,758member
    asdasd wrote: »
    No it doesn't. I'm afraid you don't understand either English or logic.

    Didn't I have you on ignore?

    evidently not, trollster.

    that was c# syntax and I understand your logic perfectly -- it's already been destroyed above. no active software stops being improved. if you were an actual software dev (doubtful) you'd know this.
  • Reply 19 of 25
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by asdasd View Post



    VS is better

     

    At what? Being an expensive, bloated mess?

  • Reply 20 of 25
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 12,826member
    nobodyy wrote: »
    OMG.

    6.3 was a pile of shit. It was literally given to developers as an incomplete piece of software.
    I guess it depends upon which versions you are comparing the IDE with. xCode in the 6.x series seemed to pick up some real performance advantages on old hardware. Before my MBP update I was actually fairly happen with the improved performance on old hardware.

    Xcode has been a decent IDE through the ages, but 6.3 has been unusable for me.

    Unfortunately I haven't gotten into 6.x heavily instead using Eclipse to build a python project. However I have an idea or two for both platforms that will have me back on XCode. That and I really need to learn Swift. Maybe the bug will be gone by the time I get back to it.
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