Apple disables iOS News app in China amid censorship concerns

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 68
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

     
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by idrey View Post



    So you are saying that when people come to your house

    They can do as as they wish, with out boundaries? They can

    Ignor your rules completely?




    So you think it's just fine then for a private businesses to discriminate and only serve certain people. After all it's that businesses house right?

    Who are the private businesses?

  • Reply 22 of 68
    rogifanrogifan Posts: 10,669member
    techlover wrote: »
    Who are the private businesses?

    Oh things like flower shops, bakeries, photographers, etc.
  • Reply 23 of 68
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post

     
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by TechLover View Post



    Who are the private businesses?




    Oh things like flower shops, bakeries, photographers, etc.

    I see what you are saying.

     

    Title II needs to be updated in light of recent Supreme Court decisions.

     

    I wasn't sure what you were talking about. 

     

    Apologies.

  • Reply 24 of 68
    idrey wrote: »
    So you are saying that when people come to your house
    They can do as as they wish, with out boundaries? They can
    Ignor your rules completely?

    Aliens who arrive on Earth and decide to impose their moral and societal norms on humans. We would no doubt greet them as liberators and follow their standards. /s
  • Reply 25 of 68
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Suddenly Newton View Post

     
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by idrey View Post



    So you are saying that when people come to your house

    They can do as as they wish, with out boundaries? They can

    Ignor your rules completely?




    Aliens who arrive on Earth and decide to impose their moral and societal norms on humans. We would no doubt greet them as liberators and follow their standards. /s

    "To serve man"

     

    Oh wait it's a cook book!

  • Reply 26 of 68
    blazarblazar Posts: 270member
    With the massive population if the earth, tyranny is the rule and not the exception.
  • Reply 27 of 68
    rogifan wrote: »
    Sad to see that Apple support censorship. Tim Cook is all about human rights and values except when it comes to China. I wish American companies would quit letting China bully them around.
    Perhaps it is "supporting" censorship but consider that, if they don't obey the laws of the countries where they operate, their ability to conduct business might be severely, and negatively, impacted. That would include both retail and supply/manufacturing in the case of China.
  • Reply 28 of 68
    This is the reality of global business. Either respect the local laws such as they are, or go elsewhere.

    Nothing much to see here, move along....
  • Reply 29 of 68
    rickers wrote: »
    The News app is crap anyway.  They should disable it everywhere.

    However, I do love how the Apple 'faithful' spin every move as 'magical'.

    what faithful? and can you quote somebody calling news magical?
  • Reply 30 of 68
    rogifan wrote: »
    So you think it's just fine then for a private businesses to discriminate and only serve certain people. After all it's that businesses house right?

    poor example because doing so would be illegal and runs afoul of public accommodation laws and the enumerated discrimination categories.

    having rules in your private home isn't the same as its not a place open to the public. but even your rules are limited in scope to what's legal.
  • Reply 31 of 68
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by JoshA View Post

     

    So true and the same happens in the UK, some outside of the UK sites can be blocked.




    Yes, for example I have a fully paid subscription to HBO Now.  They are happy to take my money each month, but attempts in Korea to access them prompts the inevitable "The video is not available in your region" censorship message.  I am reduced to using a VPN just to access content I have already paid for, perhaps even making me a criminal under some interpretations of the federal statutes.  

  • Reply 32 of 68
    koopkoop Posts: 337member

    With China rising as an economic superpower, it's disgusting to watch the world having to just accept massive censorship and information suppression. They have essentially mangled the internet there. Rarely do US leaders talk about human rights violations, and rarely do companies speak out about having to butcher their products to get sold there.

     

    Everyone is bending over backwards to sell products their billion consumers want. Google just pulled a 180 after they pulled out of China. No American company wants to fall behind to a Chinese company in the world marketplace. They will though, after trade secrets are hacked endlessly from corporate servers, and laws enacted to favor Chinese companies. What a wonderful world indeed.

  • Reply 33 of 68

    Why so sure that this is Apple's fault? Plenty of Western services don't work (or work badly) in China, because of the Great Firewall.

    Gmail, for example, pretty much never works. For all you know, the connections attempt to make it out of China but are so delayed but Chinese internet nonsense that the requests just time out when (if) they finally hit the Apple servers. 

  • Reply 34 of 68
    normmnormm Posts: 653member
    koop wrote: »
    With China rising as an economic superpower, it's disgusting to watch the world having to just accept massive censorship and information suppression. They have essentially mangled the internet there. Rarely do US leaders talk about human rights violations, and rarely do companies speak out about having to butcher their products to get sold there.

    The more we trade with them, even if we have to censor our products, the richer their ordinary people become, and the harder it is to keep them ignorant. Isolating them just makes the whole world poorer, and their people most of all. And there's nothing like a disabled feature on your iPhone to make you want to be allowed to enable it!
  • Reply 35 of 68
    snovasnova Posts: 1,281member

    real change happens only when things get really bad.  Lots of potential for change if things keep going this way.  A bit scary thinking about the violence that will occur when it does happen. Only a matter of time if the economy truly does collapse due to multiple bubbles created by the state.

  • Reply 36 of 68
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post



    Sad to see that Apple support censorship. Tim Cook is all about human rights and values except when it comes to China. I wish American companies would quit letting China bully them around.



    I fine stance to take but in reality, Apple need to be in China's good books otherwise their supply of product could just vanish overnight.

    China is Apple's weak point. A single point of failure. Cut off supply from Foxconn and Apple revenue takes deep dive. The share price will drop even more as Wall St bails big time.

    IMHO, Apple must develop alternative places where their kit is made preferably outside of Asia.

     

    Come on Apple lets have a working News App here in the UK. We ain't China so why have you not let us use it?

    Sure we can change our location to the US and wonderful, a good number of UK news are available.

    So why?

  • Reply 37 of 68
    josha wrote: »
    When doing business in a country the rules of the country must be followed or else.
    The USA doesn't set or enforce the rules in China.

    On the other hand this just confirms my previous decision not to travel in China.
    I have gone to HK and a web Email I sent to Au from the hotel lobby computer there was diverted and not received.
    I know it was sent, because a BCC copy to the Email web site, my carriers in CDA, was received.
    That diverted Email had the receiving site altered to a "bucket" somewhere else?
    With all the travel around the world by China citizens, I find it very out of date for China to play such communication games.

    I very, very much doubt this was anything sinister, although sending personal email from some random hotel computer in this day and age is just a bad idea in general. Could have even caught by a spam filter at several points, could have been accidentally deleted, could be various server misconfigurations, etc. Hong Kong is not behind the great firewall. There is no internet censorship in Hong Kong, and network traffic does not use the same exchanges as mainland China.
  • Reply 38 of 68
    y2any2an Posts: 130member
    As American internet companies are slowly finding in Europe, American laws don't apply everywhere.
  • Reply 39 of 68
    I like that Apple does this. They're making it clear that "News" in China would be a watered-down version of reality; therefore, rather than giving people an imperfect experience, they turn you away completely and encourage you to find a complete source.
  • Reply 40 of 68
    taniwhataniwha Posts: 347member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Rogifan View Post



    Sad to see that Apple support censorship. Tim Cook is all about human rights and values except when it comes to China. I wish American companies would quit letting China bully them around.

    Oh c'mon Rogifan. Its about money, its about profit.  Even Google is re-thinking its withdrawal from China because it's costing them Money and Market share. And unlike Apple, Google specifically withdrew from China rather than cave in to expediency in the greed for profit ... and now they seem to have changed their viewpoint.

     

    How one sees this reality is up to the customers in the end. No foreign company, much less a gadget-maker, has enough clout to have any effect on the Chinese CP.

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