Video: more than half of Apple Campus 2 Spaceship Ring has topped out, just six months after it beg

Posted:
in General Discussion edited March 2016
Five of the nine building segments making up the "Spaceship" Ring in Apple's Campus 2 mega-project have reached their ceiling just six months after the initial dining hall structure reached its fifth floor back in March.



Apple Campus 2

Apple Campus 2




Below, an aerial video shows the current state of Apple's Campus 2 Spaceship Ring, compared to the excavated site one year ago and the initial segment completed six months ago.









Rapid progress on the iconic Campus 2 complex has come via an innovative structural design that stacks interlocking concrete void slabs, which "serve as both the ceiling of one floor and support for the raised surface of the floor above," Apple has stated. The Ring's nine building segments of four floors are joined by open hallways that radiate from the center circle, as seen below.









Apple's web site states, "we have approached this [Campus 2 construction] project with the same care and attention to detail we devote to designing any Apple product. We will replace 2.65 million square feet of environmentally and operationally obsolete buildings with a 2.8-million-square-foot iconic, 21st-century research and development campus."

Expected occupation by the end of next year



Granted final approval just two years ago, Apple's Campus 2 project is rapidly moving toward its occupancy goal of 2016.



Apple's cofounder Steve Jobs unveiled the huge project in 2011, noting that the central 2.8-million-square-foot "Spaceship" structure would house at least 12,000 employees, surrounded by bucolic landscaping including orchards of fruit trees and other greenery, featuring open space and walking paths to reclaim most of the 150-acre plot previously covered by asphalt parking lots.



Campus 2 Ring




Campus 2 open space




Next to the center of Campus 2, Apple's parallel Phase 2 project is also well underway, adding additional office space, workshops, research and development labs and incorporating a small data center powered by renewable energy.



See previous coverage on AppleInsider of Apple Campus 2 and the current Infinite Loop headquarters, or our other articles on drones. Viewers interested in the DJI Phantom 2 Vision+ drone can read more about the device here.



Note: Readers should be aware that Apple's Campus 2 site is extremely hazardous to photograph using an aerial drone, in part because the site is so large it is nearly impossible to fly over even one quarter of the site within constant visual or radio contact using consumer drone, and in part because the site is partially within an FAA restricted zone because of the nearby San Jose International Airport. There is constant low flying aircraft traffic over the site. We strongly encourage inexperienced aerial drone pilots not to attempt to fly in or around the site.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 25
    iqatedoiqatedo Posts: 1,607member



    Living on the opposite side of the world, I'd been missing the video updates, nice to catch up. Looking forward to the next.

  • Reply 2 of 25
    If you haven't done so check out the site on Apple Maps - East Homestead Rd Cupertino CA. Apple is keeping this view fairly current and with 3D viewing.
  • Reply 3 of 25
    iqatedoiqatedo Posts: 1,607member
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by McHumm3r View Post



    If you haven't done so check out the site on Apple Maps - East Homestead Rd Cupertino CA. Apple is keeping this view fairly current and with 3D viewing.



    Thank you.

     

  • Reply 4 of 25

    I like this article here that has the whole timeline of AC2:

     

    http://9to5mac.com/2015/02/12/campus-2-construction-progress-timeline/

  • Reply 5 of 25
    irelandireland Posts: 17,645member

    Ye should partner with this guy:

     

  • Reply 6 of 25
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by AppleInsider View Post



    Note: Readers should be aware that Apple's Campus 2 site is extremely hazardous to photograph using an aerial drone, in part because the site is so large it is nearly impossible to fly over even one quarter of the site within constant visual or radio contact using consumer drone, and in part because the site is partially within an FAA restricted zone because of the nearby San Jose International Airport. There is constant low flying aircraft traffic over the site. We strongly encourage inexperienced aerial drone pilots not to attempt to fly in or around the site.

    I hadn't paid too much attention to the progress except to glance at an occasional pic, but wondered why the video coverage remained on the periphery instead of directly overhead of dead center.

     

    It's nice to find out why, and realize the expanse of the project. Maybe there will be greater, sanctioned coverage in the future. I'd like to see professional drone coverage, complete with a spotter and ghillie suits. 

  • Reply 7 of 25

    Any chance your videos could be offered in Flash format?  The location I am at blocks YouTube, Facebook and Twitter so I cannot see many published videos.  Thanks

  • Reply 8 of 25
    Wasn't "Five of 9" Seven's younger sister?
  • Reply 9 of 25
    rob53rob53 Posts: 2,072member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by JimInSD View Post

     

    Any chance your videos could be offered in Flash format?  The location I am at blocks YouTube, Facebook and Twitter so I cannot see many published videos.  Thanks




    Flash? This video is embedded HTML5. I can't wait to see the final obituary for Flash, which can't come soon enough. If you can't view this video then you must be at work or have the worst ISP in the world.

  • Reply 10 of 25
    bobschlobbobschlob Posts: 1,074member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by rob53 View Post

     
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JimInSD View Post

     

    Any chance your videos could be offered in Flash format?  The location I am at blocks YouTube, Facebook and Twitter so I cannot see many published videos.  Thanks




    Flash? This video is embedded HTML5. I can't wait to see the final obituary for Flash, which can't come soon enough. If you can't view this video then you must be at work or have the worst ISP in the world.




    Not for me, it isn't. The video is in Flash (which is why I can't see it (because I refuse to load flash)

  • Reply 11 of 25
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by rob53 View Post

     
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by JimInSD View Post

     

    Any chance your videos could be offered in Flash format?  The location I am at blocks YouTube, Facebook and Twitter so I cannot see many published videos.  Thanks




    Flash? This video is embedded HTML5. I can't wait to see the final obituary for Flash, which can't come soon enough. If you can't view this video then you must be at work or have the worst ISP in the world.




    Well HTML5 would work fine as well as Flash.  What I should have said is can the video be available for viewing at a location other than YouTube, Facebook or Twitter.  FWIW, I am at an independent living facility and those sites are blocked to prevent the employees form playing while they are working.  Thanks again,

     

    Jim

  • Reply 12 of 25
    jiminsd wrote: »

    Well HTML5 would work fine as well as Flash.  What I should have said is can the video be available for viewing at a location other than YouTube, Facebook or Twitter.  FWIW, I am at an independent living facility and those sites are blocked to prevent the employees form playing while they are working.  Thanks again,

    Jim

    That makes more sense. Flash has too many zero-day exploits to be a good idea for a work PC.
  • Reply 13 of 25

    They better be doing a Discovery Channel special on this building when they're done. It would be a shame if they didn't have a camera crew following construction from beginning to end just for that purpose. They've done a lot of these shows in the past, and this seems like an ideal candidate for one.

     

     

    Off topic, my first iPhone finally arrived. Of course, I had to check to see what processor it had and I got a TSMC. Funny thing, I ran Geekbench and under "Motherboard" is lists "N66mAP" which is for TSMC. So I guess you don't actually need to download Lirum or any other App to see what processor you have. Anyone else run Geekbench and bothered to look at the Motherboard to see if it correctly identifies your processor?

  • Reply 14 of 25
    Off topic, my first iPhone finally arrived.

    Literally you're first iPhone? If so, what were you using up until this point?
  • Reply 15 of 25
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 12,984member
    solipsismy wrote: »
    Off topic, my first iPhone finally arrived.

    Literally you're first iPhone? If so, what were you using up until this point?

    I'm guessing it's the first of many, and not the first ever.
  • Reply 16 of 25
    solipsismy wrote: »
    Literally you're first iPhone? If so, what were you using up until this point?

    LOL. First of the 6S's I ordered for the family. This year I got everyone a 6S instead of giving the kids last years phones like I used to.
  • Reply 17 of 25
    paxmanpaxman Posts: 4,607member
    LOL. First of the 6S's I ordered for the family. This year I got everyone a 6S instead of giving the kids last years phones like I used to.
    Nice. I hope they appreciate you. Like Paul Getty said - “Money isn't everything but it sure keeps you in touch with your children”. :)
  • Reply 18 of 25
    fred1fred1 Posts: 330member
    ". . . via an innovative structural design that stacks interlocking concrete void slabs, which "serve as both the ceiling of one floor and support for the raised surface of the floor above," Apple has stated."

    Innovative? Nothing could be more normal/traditional than the concrete slab to be the ceiling of one level and the floor, or support for the raised floor, of the level above.

    How else would this be done? Two slabs for each level???
  • Reply 19 of 25
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,767member
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Fred1 View Post



    ". . . via an innovative structural design that stacks interlocking concrete void slabs, which "serve as both the ceiling of one floor and support for the raised surface of the floor above," Apple has stated."



    Innovative? Nothing could be more normal/traditional than the concrete slab to be the ceiling of one level and the floor, or support for the raised floor, of the level above.



    How else would this be done? Two slabs for each level???

     

    Its the stacking of modules which structurally support the level above that's the innovation.

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