Apple CEO hints at more cross-platform services, says iPad revenue will rebound by year's end

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 77
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 6,957member
    I think people are making more out of Cook's Music comments than they deserve. Of course Music on Android is just a test of Apple services on another platform. But unless iPhone growth really is stalling I don't see anything else coming to Android anytime soon. Apple's strength is controlling the whole widget. 
    Yes, I think the article's author got a little overexcited there. 

    I think they'll port iTunes because have a version for Windows.  I don't think they'll port Messages because the blue bubbles seem to some sort of status symbol. 

    There's no need to port Pages et al because the suite is accessible on the web in all its stunted glory. 
  • Reply 42 of 77
    k2kwk2kw Posts: 2,073member
    cali said:


    Why should I buy an iPhone now if I can get the whole ecosystem on a $50 competitors phone? This is literally the FIRST time I've ever thought of replacing my iPhone with a cheap knockoff. Pretty scary really.


    Itunes on Android would definately get me thinking about the Galaxy 6 Edge+  which I consider much better looking than plain jane 6/6S.
  • Reply 43 of 77

    COO Jeff Williams added that the company will soon announce that all of the smelted metals Apple uses are either conflict-free, or from partners presently being validated for conflict-free status.
    He who smelt it, dealt it.
    pscooter63SpamSandwichcalifastasleep
  • Reply 44 of 77
    dasanman69dasanman69 Posts: 13,002member
    Apple Watch for Android makes sense, IMO. That'd really open up the market, and it would follow the path of the iPod.
    You really think there's that many Android users who would want an Watch. I'm skeptical.
    Why not? Many Android users have iPads. 
  • Reply 45 of 77
    Would be cool if we could get back multiparty (more than 2 people) video chatting in FaceTime. That was a nice feature back when they used to have it on desktop (and back when it used to be called iChat AV).
    edited February 2016 nolamacguyargonaut
  • Reply 46 of 77
    k2kwk2kw Posts: 2,073member
    Mr_Grey said:
    Apple really doesn't seem to have a clue in how to make the iPad market grow in the long term.  Not only that, they seem to be moving in the wrong direction (with the noted exception of the Pencil).  
    As some one who bought an iPad Air II last December, I had no interest in an Apple pencil  ( I really wanted quad speakers).  The pencil seems like an over priced glorified mouse substitute.  

    If Apple wants the iPad to grow they need to position it as an alternative to users having home computers and that means cutting the price by $50 - %150 dollars, lowering the additional cost for the cell modem,  and offering the pencil as a $75 accessory.   They should be selling 50 million a year.   To grow their eco-system they need to double the number of users which will require cheaper iPhones and cheaper iPads.      For now the Watch is just a distraction but cause why do you need it when you have a iPhone.

    Along with this they need to make huge investments into their software and services. 
  • Reply 47 of 77
    Mr_Grey said:
    Also, who really gives a rodent's behind about the super-rich Apple employees work benefits?  Most of the employees at Apple (barring the retail ones) are millionaires already. They already have the kind of working conditions one would expect in Canada or Europe and are thus far above the rest of the American population already.  Why should I as a customer of Apple care that they now have even more?  
    Speaking as an employee, I can categorically refute your statement that most of us are millionaires.
    anantksundaramSpamSandwichnolamacguyfastasleep
  • Reply 48 of 77
    clemynxclemynx Posts: 1,536member
    I'm not an expert or anything, but by my own calculations I had come to the conclusion that iPad sales (not only revenue) would stabilize beginning the end of 2016 and during the first half 2017. 
  • Reply 49 of 77
    Would be cool if we could get back multiparty (more than 2 people) video chatting in FaceTime. That was a nice feature back when they used to have it on desktop (and back when it used to be called iChat AV).
    FaceTime should make possible group chats like Skype does. And, along with iMessage (that @ireland referred to earlier), facetime would be far more valuable if it were cross-platform. 
  • Reply 50 of 77
    croprcropr Posts: 1,080member
    kkerst said:
    ireland said:
    Cross-platform iMessage is a dream of mine. I want to use iMessage to contact every person I know along with its beatiful and generous selection of emoji.

    I want to permanently delete Facebook Messenger, Kik, WhatsApp and JellySMS from my iPhone. iMessage on Android means I can iMessage everyone!
    Don't you think iMessage is a selling point of iOS/OS X? The very fact that is does not exist on other platforms is reason enough (for me) to never need Android. Designing iMessage would not create the lure and would just keep people from not switching to iOS in the first place. That's a slippery slope that has to be managed very carefully. There are cross platform messaging apps (what's app, Skype...the list goes on I'm sure) if that's what you want.
    For me it is the opposite.  I am never using iMessage because it is not cross platform.  In my family we have 4 iPhones and 7 Android phones users, so all communication apps that are not cross platform (iMessage, Faces) are simply not used in my family.
  • Reply 51 of 77
    croprcropr Posts: 1,080member
    volcan said:
    1983 said:
    I wondered how long it would take for Apple in the Cook era to offer most of their services on other platforms. And it seems like its going to be sooner rather than later. I don't think Jobs would of liked the idea of all Apple services offered on other competing platforms (especially Android which he hated!) 
    When you think about it they already offer a lot of free cross-platform services because an Apple ID is all you need to access all iWork applications on iCloud using just a browser.
    iWork in a browser is a very lousy product, that is no match for products like Google Docs or the browser version of Office.  A PC owner should have a really distorted mind to consider iWork
  • Reply 52 of 77
    MarvinMarvin Posts: 14,834moderator
    ireland said:
    Cross-platform iMessage is a dream of mine. I want to use iMessage to contact every person I know along with its beatiful and generous selection of emoji.

    I want to permanently delete Facebook Messenger, Kik, WhatsApp and JellySMS from my iPhone. iMessage on Android means I can iMessage everyone!
    This wouldn't require iMessage on Android, just an API. Apple can setup a cloud service where 3rd party apps would have an iMessage user's id and send messages in a particular format. This cloud service would also store responses to that person that they could retrieve on any platform, even Windows/Windows Phone. This would be much easier for them to do than building and maintaining an Android app and people on Android can use whatever app they want. It would be up to their preferred messaging app to implement support of the API. Email doesn't require Apple to build Mail for Android but Android users can access iCloud email accounts and communicate with iOS users no problem.

    Android device manufacturers go out of their way to mimic the look and feel of iOS products. Building the same apps just plays right into their hands. The fewer opportunities that Android users can say that their products are good enough alternatives, the better for Apple. Interoperability (cross-platform services) is the best solution, not cross-platform apps. This applies to video chat too. It should be possible for Skype to connect to someone using Facetime or Google Hangouts. The outgoing video streams are encoded by the apps, the recipient just has to decode a video/audio/text feed so if those are in standard formats or decoding extensions are provided, it's trivial to have them all work with each other.
  • Reply 53 of 77
    Cross-platform iMessage is a non-issue. iMessage still delivers your message cross-platform, but with the added cost of a SMS. Fair enough for me. Android users are not in my close entourage, and I don't want their message appear as iMessage. I am willing to pay a few SMS cents to not see any Android originated iMessage in my inbox. In my daily business I like to discover if a customer's phone supports iMessage, if not, then I notify them with WhatsApp or Facebook Messenger or Viber and I gladly accept the burden of carrying a couple of 3d party messaging apps to see iMessage platform-specific.
    edited February 2016 nolamacguy
  • Reply 54 of 77
    knowitallknowitall Posts: 1,648member
    iPad revenue up, but not its profits?
    But seriously, to have a super computer in your pocket or on the table, but not being able to use it as a full-blown computer is the main issue with iPhones and iPads.
    They are way to expensive, that's true also, but not being able to use them as a general purpose computer is inexcusable. For example my iPhone (5s) is a better computer than my desktop iMac (3GHz core two duo) especially with its GPU, but I cannot use this power in any meaningful way.
    Other computer and OS makers like Ubuntu and MS recognize this problem and begin to offer ways to use the portable super computers in a desktop scenario. This makes sense.
    Apple and other phone and pad makers should also make extensibility and repair a real possibility, so  memory, batteries and CPU/GPU should all be easily upgradable, also system busses should be available via connectors so super HD screens and super fast external drives can run at native speed.
    The OS should of course switch to desktop mode too, when connected to external devices so users can use Final Cut Pro X, Xcode and all other desktop applications they like.
    Apple will probably not do this, but this will create the space needed for others to be the dominant computer manufacturers of the future.
    My bet is on a free and open system: Linux, and maybe the hardware will be free and open too, if manufacturers prefer profits above customers.
  • Reply 55 of 77
    The issue of offering cross-platform services can't be answered yes or no. If a cross-platform Apple service has a durable (long-lasting) element whose value to the user grows over time, then offering it to Android customers today will both generate revenues for Apple in the current quarter and increase the likelihood of Android customers switching to iOS over the long run. The latter is key to Apple's decision. Apple Music, for example, lets the Android customer develop a user profile/preferences and save playlists that would have even greater value after switching to iOS because that user data can be used over a wide range of compatible iOS devices. Thus the Android smartphone user with Apple Music may eventually purchase AppleTV, Mac or iPad to share that subscription (including the user profile and playlists) across more devices and services, such as Siri (and artificial intelligence services of the future). Android support for Apple Watch falls into that same category, by hooking the user into ApplePay while promising an even better experience after switching to iPhone. This logic also explains why, more than a decade ago, Apple offered iTunes software to PC users -- both to sell them music players and to eventually induce them to trade in their PC's for Macs. Incremental profits from iTunes sales, which were near-zero, wouldn't have justified offering iTunes to PC's. If Apple offers iMessage to Android, by contrast, then Android users will enjoy the benefit of communicating more easily with iPhone users, but nothing durable accumulates for the Android customer that would be of even greater value if he/she would migrate to iOS. In fact, offering iMessage for Android may be more likely to encourage Android users to hold onto their current devices than switch to enjoy superior messaging. The relative magnitudes of current (user benefits and Apple revenues) to durable/long-lasting (user benefits and Apple revenues) will vary from one service (or app) to the next, and in practice the relative magnitudes can only be judged empirically, by observing the behavior of Android users. Apple should promote cross-platform services mainly when current use creates something with a durable value for customers. That is how Apple uses its ecosystem to play offense.
  • Reply 56 of 77
    quadra 610quadra 610 Posts: 6,756member
    knowitall said:
    iPad revenue up, but not its profits?
    But seriously, to have a super computer in your pocket or on the table, but not being able to use it as a full-blown computer is the main issue with iPhones and iPads.
    They are way to expensive, that's true also, but not being able to use them as a general purpose computer is inexcusable. For example my iPhone (5s) is a better computer than my desktop iMac (3GHz core two duo) especially with its GPU, but I cannot use this power in any meaningful way.
    Other computer and OS makers like Ubuntu and MS recognize this problem and begin to offer ways to use the portable super computers in a desktop scenario. This makes sense.
    Apple and other phone and pad makers should also make extensibility and repair a real possibility, so  memory, batteries and CPU/GPU should all be easily upgradable, also system busses should be available via connectors so super HD screens and super fast external drives can run at native speed.
    The OS should of course switch to desktop mode too, when connected to external devices so users can use Final Cut Pro X, Xcode and all other desktop applications they like.
    Apple will probably not do this, but this will create the space needed for others to be the dominant computer manufacturers of the future.
    My bet is on a free and open system: Linux, and maybe the hardware will be free and open too, if manufacturers prefer profits above customers.


    These ideas don't work right in practice.
  • Reply 57 of 77
    Would be cool if we could get back multiparty (more than 2 people) video chatting in FaceTime. That was a nice feature back when they used to have it on desktop (and back when it used to be called iChat AV).
    FaceTime should make possible group chats like Skype does. And, along with iMessage (that @ireland referred to earlier), facetime would be far more valuable if it were cross-platform. 
    Yep.
  • Reply 58 of 77
    tmaytmay Posts: 5,812member
    I think people are making more out of Cook's Music comments than they deserve. Of course Music on Android is just a test of Apple services on another platform. But unless iPhone growth really is stalling I don't see anything else coming to Android anytime soon. Apple's strength is controlling the whole widget. 
    Beats was on Android prior to Apple purchasing the company. In that case, it made sense to continue to serve Beats Customers.
  • Reply 59 of 77
    tmaytmay Posts: 5,812member
    knowitall said:
    iPad revenue up, but not its profits?
    But seriously, to have a super computer in your pocket or on the table, but not being able to use it as a full-blown computer is the main issue with iPhones and iPads.
    They are way to expensive, that's true also, but not being able to use them as a general purpose computer is inexcusable. For example my iPhone (5s) is a better computer than my desktop iMac (3GHz core two duo) especially with its GPU, but I cannot use this power in any meaningful way.
    Other computer and OS makers like Ubuntu and MS recognize this problem and begin to offer ways to use the portable super computers in a desktop scenario. This makes sense.
    Apple and other phone and pad makers should also make extensibility and repair a real possibility, so  memory, batteries and CPU/GPU should all be easily upgradable, also system busses should be available via connectors so super HD screens and super fast external drives can run at native speed.
    The OS should of course switch to desktop mode too, when connected to external devices so users can use Final Cut Pro X, Xcode and all other desktop applications they like.
    Apple will probably not do this, but this will create the space needed for others to be the dominant computer manufacturers of the future.
    My bet is on a free and open system: Linux, and maybe the hardware will be free and open too, if manufacturers prefer profits above customers.
    None of what you speak of will ever happen because its is a flawed premise. People aren't pining to plug in their smartphone to monitors, they aren't pining to upgrade their computer's hardware, they like having an OS optimized for a particular device, and they don't want free and open systems that require them to have to provide technical support to their own devices. Apple understands this, as does Google for the most part.

    They want appliances. They want easy to use services.

    Good luck to MS with what it is doing, but I'm not seeing anything that indicates they will be able to get back into mobile in any substantial way. The PC model of upgrading hardware, with the exception of a few niches, is dead.
  • Reply 60 of 77
    brucemcbrucemc Posts: 1,541member
    knowitall said:
    iPad revenue up, but not its profits?
    But seriously, to have a super computer in your pocket or on the table, but not being able to use it as a full-blown computer is the main issue with iPhones and iPads.
    They are way to expensive, that's true also, but not being able to use them as a general purpose computer is inexcusable. For example my iPhone (5s) is a better computer than my desktop iMac (3GHz core two duo) especially with its GPU, but I cannot use this power in any meaningful way.
    Other computer and OS makers like Ubuntu and MS recognize this problem and begin to offer ways to use the portable super computers in a desktop scenario. This makes sense.
    Apple and other phone and pad makers should also make extensibility and repair a real possibility, so  memory, batteries and CPU/GPU should all be easily upgradable, also system busses should be available via connectors so super HD screens and super fast external drives can run at native speed.
    The OS should of course switch to desktop mode too, when connected to external devices so users can use Final Cut Pro X, Xcode and all other desktop applications they like.
    Apple will probably not do this, but this will create the space needed for others to be the dominant computer manufacturers of the future.
    My bet is on a free and open system: Linux, and maybe the hardware will be free and open too, if manufacturers prefer profits above customers.
    Sounds like you should start your own company here and ride that bet, since you don't think anyone is going a good job.  You really need to get behind this one device does all, mobile OS & desktop OS in one, very small but somehow all parts user replaceable & upgradable, together with a multitude of connectors to connect to just about any device.  While you are at it, make it waterproof.  Good luck!
    nolamacguy
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