The easy guide to switching from Windows to Mac

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 76
    When someone, somewhere, sometime comes up with a statistical simulations software for the Mac, please let me know. 
    IBM SPSS?
    Thanks. This must be fairly new. The SPSS website is currently buggy and slow, and their phone support is available only on weekdays. I have an email out to IBM support to find out more, as well as to some folks whom I think should be in the know. 

    Will let let you know if this indeed the case (although the pricing of SPSS, which runs into the many $000s, could be an issue).

    It would be so nice if there was a plug-in like there is for the Windows version of Excel.
    SujeitoSujeito
  • Reply 22 of 76
    thedba said:
    I'd be much more interested in a description of the reverse switch since I just bought a used Dell workstation for video and photo editing. I maxed it out with components I'd not even be able to put in a Mac, with the exception of an outdated Mac Pro. This is after 25 years of exclusive Mac usage. Back in the day the Mac was a serious offer for people like me. Nowadays I'd pay a multitude for an inferior Apple machine. It's probably my mistake to expect a smart phone company to deliver powerful stationary computers for creative professionals like I ;)

    As far as you paying more for a Mac than a similar Windows machine, that's an ancient myth. 
    Try speccing a similar windows laptop for example, with SSD onto PCIe with same amount of memory etc. And you'll find out that Macs are very well priced. Tried it also with MS surfacebook and found it to be more expensive than a similar MBP. 

    It was a myth in 2010, but now it's very true. There are plenty of laptops that are as good as, or surpass the MBP in almost every way and cost less. I'm on a 2014 MBP and it was probably the last device from Apple to be truly worth the premium.

    I now have a SP4 that I am using more and more... I'll be very sorry to leave Mac behind (which I haven't done yet, actually typing on it now) but Apple have shown zero interest in providing truly powerful machines for professional use.
    williamlondon
  • Reply 23 of 76
    I hate how Apple entices their professional customers then abandons them. Or as with the New MacBook Pro strip out pro features and keeps the "pro" moniker.
    williamlondonbrucemc
  • Reply 24 of 76
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,665member
    I'd be much more interested in a description of the reverse switch since I just bought a used Dell workstation for video and photo editing. I maxed it out with components I'd not even be able to put in a Mac, with the exception of an outdated Mac Pro. This is after 25 years of exclusive Mac usage. Back in the day the Mac was a serious offer for people like me. Nowadays I'd pay a multitude for an inferior Apple machine. It's probably my mistake to expect a smart phone company to deliver powerful stationary computers for creative professionals like I ;)
    Hyperbolic nonsense. I'm a creative professional and my desktop is a 2011 iMac (SSD and plenty of RAM and VRAM), it's still a good machine for software development, running VMs, IDEs, Creative Suite, etc. 

    As for your photo & video editing, I'd love to hear why even the current iMac is unable to run your needed software, specifically. If I'm running Lightroom and Photoshop on a 2011, why can't you on a new machine?

    Also, it's not true that comparatively-spec'd PCs are cheaper than Macs. In fact the opposite has been shown to be true when building Dell pro desktops. 
    I am running Davinci Resolve. All current Macs have under-specced GPUs for my needs.

    An equally specced Dell Workstation is as expensive as a Mac Pro, but one can get up to date GPUs. And if one chooses to build a custom PC one would pay a fraction of the price of a Dell workstation or Mac Pro.
    I built PCs for years, trying to compare them to a finished product from one company is absurd. When you build a DIY PC you are not getting any support contracts, and no guarantee that the stuff is going to work together without issue. When your vid card and motherboard have issues neither one is going to support you. etc.. There is no AppleCare. 

    Davinci is a video editor, so I'm assuming you're able to use Adobe's products just fine on a mac. As for Davinci I'm not sure sure of its requirements but i'd still be shocked if they didn't work on even the stale Pro. Since, you know, they sell it for the Mac. 
    edited February 2017 SoliwilliamlondonRayz2016watto_cobra
  • Reply 25 of 76
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,665member
    MacPro said:
    I'd be much more interested in a description of the reverse switch since I just bought a used Dell workstation for video and photo editing. I maxed it out with components I'd not even be able to put in a Mac, with the exception of an outdated Mac Pro. This is after 25 years of exclusive Mac usage. Back in the day the Mac was a serious offer for people like me. Nowadays I'd pay a multitude for an inferior Apple machine. It's probably my mistake to expect a smart phone company to deliver powerful stationary computers for creative professionals like I ;)
    Oh you poor thing nobody told you?  We use external disk and peripherals these days on Thunderbolt for professional work.  I have a new Mac Pro 6 core and a video editing set up that would cost far more to equal on a PC platform.  Plus, when I boot into Windows 10 Anniversary it blows away just about any PC's specs (dual GPUs with Crimson Catalyst), so I have a twofer :)
    It's about GPUs, stupid.
    Nice ad homenim attack. Sounds like you're losing and getting frustrated so you're resorting to calling forum users names. Reported.


    Soliwilliamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 26 of 76
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,665member

    Ironhead said:

    Ironhead said:
    I'd be much more interested in a description of the reverse switch since I just bought a used Dell workstation for video and photo editing. I maxed it out with components I'd not even be able to put in a Mac, with the exception of an outdated Mac Pro. This is after 25 years of exclusive Mac usage. Back in the day the Mac was a serious offer for people like me. Nowadays I'd pay a multitude for an inferior Apple machine. It's probably my mistake to expect a smart phone company to deliver powerful stationary computers for creative professionals like I ;)
    That was my first thought.
    I GUARANTEE that we aren't running any "Switching to Windows?" articles.
    Obviously.

    Äpfelundbirnen is making some good points though.
    Really, and what would those be? All I've seen are common troll tropes:

    - he's owned macs since steve jobs was born
    - macs are too expensive
    - macs aren't for professionals (and obviously a pro is only whatever it is he does)
    - macs are too slow to run his "photo & video" software (yet Photoshop/Lightroom runs fine, and Davinci Resolve has a Mac version, so...)

    ...still waiting for those good points. 
    edited February 2017 pscooter63williamlondonwatto_cobraai46
  • Reply 27 of 76
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,665member
    altivec88 said:

    Ironhead said:
    I'd be much more interested in a description of the reverse switch since I just bought a used Dell workstation for video and photo editing. I maxed it out with components I'd not even be able to put in a Mac, with the exception of an outdated Mac Pro. This is after 25 years of exclusive Mac usage. Back in the day the Mac was a serious offer for people like me. Nowadays I'd pay a multitude for an inferior Apple machine. It's probably my mistake to expect a smart phone company to deliver powerful stationary computers for creative professionals like I ;)
    That was my first thought.
    I GUARANTEE that we aren't running any "Switching to Windows?" articles.
    That's too bad.  Not sure why that is considered such a hostile request.  I was thinking the same thing as some of the others.  After 30+ years, this is the year we start transitioning over to the dark side (windows) and such an article would really help out some long time Mac users.   Does anyone know of a good site that is similar to Appleinsider but on the PC side of things?

    Some of the comments on here are beyond ridiculous.  Guess what people, "Pro's" do different things.  Just because you are able to do your Pro things on a 1997 iMac does not mean every pro can.   Get over yourself as being the centre of the universe.  Others claiming that PC workstations cost the same or are more as a Mac is just plain wrong.  You can easily configure a 30+ core HP or Dell with modern graphics and faster DDR4 Ram for less than what you would pay for the antiquated 12 core MacPro.

    There are a lot of good reasons to use Macs but making stuff up or insisting that nobody needs anything greater than an old iMac is not one of them.
    What an utter delusional version of what has been said here. Troll nonsense.

    My point was very clear -- even a loaded 2011 iMac is a good machine for me as a software engineer professional, so those that roll out the troll-trope that "Macs aren't good for pros!" is 100%, pure bunk. Nonsense. Despite your delusional claims, I never claimed my uses were your uses, or that nobody needs anything faster. Please quote me if you feel otherwise. I'll wait. Rather, I pointed out that it's BS to claim that Macs aren't for pros, because there are a shit-ton of us doing our pro work just fine here. I use a 2011 iMac and a 2014 rMBP and do enterprise professional software dev without issue. 

    There have been plenty of articles showing how equipping Dells to mimic Macs costs more.

    So no, nobody is "making things up" -- that's just your troll hater narrative showing its true colors.

    As for expecting a mac enthusiast site to produce for you a guide to switching to Windows -- just more evidence of trolling this site. Nobody in their right mind would ask or expect such a thing. Go find a Windows site, there are plenty and if you can't find one then it doesn't speak well for your abilities.
    edited February 2017 pscooter63Sujeitowilliamlondonwatto_cobraai46
  • Reply 28 of 76
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,665member

    I hate how Apple entices their professional customers then abandons them. Or as with the New MacBook Pro strip out pro features and keeps the "pro" moniker.
    Hmm what pro features are being removed on the new MBP? Legacy ports? Not a pro feature, try again. SD slot? Again not a pro feature since that's a consumer format and all my pro gear is CF anyway. So what, exactly? What feature did they remove that make it non-pro? The network jack? The CD-ROM drive? The floppy?

    Such nonsense. I'm a pro and I love slim notebooks that don't weigh very much, because I write software and use wifi and don't need to plug in any old firewire crap or what have you. Slim is light which makes it easier to move my mobile when I'm, you know, mobile. So please, stop the public crying, it won't get you anywhere. I doubt you even own a new MBP so it's frivolous anyway.
    edited February 2017 pscooter63Sujeitowilliamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 29 of 76
    SujeitoSujeito Posts: 16unconfirmed, member
    When someone, somewhere, sometime comes up with a statistical simulations software for the Mac, please let me know. 
    IBM SPSS?
    Thanks. This must be fairly new. The SPSS website is currently buggy and slow, and their phone support is available only on weekdays. I have an email out to IBM support to find out more, as well as to some folks whom I think should be in the know. 

    Will let let you know if this indeed the case (although the pricing of SPSS, which runs into the many $000s, could be an issue).

    It would be so nice if there was a plug-in like there is for the Windows version of Excel.
    Not really. I used SPSS a few years back while majoring Psychology and I used a Mac. I believe IBM had just acquired SPSS, so it's been around a few years now.

     Even so, it's not Apple's nor IBM's job to facilitate the tools for your specific needs. You have to find them yourself, be it a windows or a mac. It is only about your preference when you have a choice in the matter.
    Rayz2016watto_cobra
  • Reply 30 of 76

    I hate how Apple entices their professional customers then abandons them. Or as with the New MacBook Pro strip out pro features and keeps the "pro" moniker.
    Hmm what pro features are being on the new MBP? Legacy ports? Not a pro feature, try again. SD slot? Again not a pro feature since that's a consumer format and all my pro gear is CF anyway. So what, exactly? What feature did they remove that make it non-pro? The network jack? The CD-ROM drive? The floppy?

    Such nonsense. I'm a pro and I love slim notebooks that don't weigh very much, because I write software and use wifi and don't need to plug in any old firewire crap or what have you. Slim is light which makes it easier to move my mobile when I'm, you know, mobile. So please, stop the public crying, it won't get you anywhere. I doubt you even own a new MBP so it's frivolous anyway.
    Still, al this defending Apple is strange. After waiting for years they bring out two MacBooks (I'm not counting the stripped down version) with - well, one might say - somewhat disappointing features. And al the other computer stuff is still waiting at least two years, perhaps even more, for upgrades. I am not talking about a complete new design, just an upgrade. These upgrades happend on a far more frequent base before. So that people complain and don't understand, I get. Doesn't anyone? Why? Why is Apple not on top of things like before? Silently, suddenly, upgrading a complete line of iMacs with the latest and the greatest as was the habit. Why not anymore? So people wonder. Is Apple abandoning the computers? Getting rid of Mac OS X? All very reasonable questions in the light of the recent behavior of Apple. Not? 
    edited February 2017 williamlondonbrucemc
  • Reply 31 of 76
    SujeitoSujeito Posts: 16unconfirmed, member
    When someone, somewhere, sometime comes up with a statistical simulations software for the Mac, please let me know. 
    IBM SPSS?
    Thanks. This must be fairly new. The SPSS website is currently buggy and slow, and their phone support is available only on weekdays. I have an email out to IBM support to find out more, as well as to some folks whom I think should be in the know. 

    Will let let you know if this indeed the case (although the pricing of SPSS, which runs into the many $000s, could be an issue).

    It would be so nice if there was a plug-in like there is for the Windows version of Excel.
    Look, not to bust your cans or anything but is it really that bad you can only reach them on weekdays? Seriously? I am all for the new software companies live chatting 24/7 , but they are still not the standard and those guys usually cost a pretty penny. And here you are looking for a better service for a contradictory rate and implying it's neck to neck with some plug-in for Excel, where either you have support all year long for next to nothing (unlikely) or probably you also dont have the support you're looking for and you're bitching about something you presently don't have but don't want to pay for? I mean, come on.
    edited February 2017 Rayz2016
  • Reply 32 of 76
    It's about GPUs, stupid.
    And yet, Davinci Resolve has some features that are Mac OS-only, correct?  I guess those must not matter to you?

    edited February 2017 Rayz2016watto_cobra
  • Reply 33 of 76
    SujeitoSujeito Posts: 16unconfirmed, member

    I hate how Apple entices their professional customers then abandons them. Or as with the New MacBook Pro strip out pro features and keeps the "pro" moniker.
    Hmm what pro features are being on the new MBP? Legacy ports? Not a pro feature, try again. SD slot? Again not a pro feature since that's a consumer format and all my pro gear is CF anyway. So what, exactly? What feature did they remove that make it non-pro? The network jack? The CD-ROM drive? The floppy?

    Such nonsense. I'm a pro and I love slim notebooks that don't weigh very much, because I write software and use wifi and don't need to plug in any old firewire crap or what have you. Slim is light which makes it easier to move my mobile when I'm, you know, mobile. So please, stop the public crying, it won't get you anywhere. I doubt you even own a new MBP so it's frivolous anyway.
    Still, al this defending Apple is strange. After waiting for years they bring out two MacBooks (I'm not counting the stripped down version) with - well, one might say - somewhat disappointing features. And al the other computer stuff is still waiting at least two years, perhaps even more, for upgrades. I am not talking about a complete new design, just an upgrade. These upgrades happend on a far more frequent base before. So that people complain and don't understand, I get. Doesn't anyone? Why? Why is Apple not on top of things like before? Silently, suddenly, upgrading a complete line of iMacs with the latest and the greatest as was the habit. Why not anymore? So people wonder. Is Apple abandoning the computers? Getting rid of Mac OS X? All very reasonable questions in the light of the recent behavior of Apple. Not? 
    Oh my... it's not about defending apple.  it's about those not being relevant points.

    It's about being amazed at why would someone whine about something they either don't use or are not obligated to use.

     They took their time, and this MacBook line is what they have to show for it. I would argue it's pretty good. Don't like it? Don't use it. Not that hard. That is the point.

    People only complain either because of jealousy or because they really know what the alternative is like and what peace of mind you have to give just for a measly few extra spec numbers that are mostly car salesman talk. I assure you that the few seconds you think you might gain with those specs are thrown overboard once you start troubleshooting a wintel machine. And if you enjoy being a mac user, software/experience wise, I think you know it too.
    edited February 2017 watto_cobra
  • Reply 34 of 76
    I'd be much more interested in a description of the reverse switch since I just bought a used Dell workstation for video and photo editing. I maxed it out with components I'd not even be able to put in a Mac, with the exception of an outdated Mac Pro. This is after 25 years of exclusive Mac usage. Back in the day the Mac was a serious offer for people like me. Nowadays I'd pay a multitude for an inferior Apple machine. It's probably my mistake to expect a smart phone company to deliver powerful stationary computers for creative professionals like I ;)
    Hyperbolic nonsense. I'm a creative professional and my desktop is a 2011 iMac (SSD and plenty of RAM and VRAM), it's still a good machine for software development, running VMs, IDEs, Creative Suite, etc. 

    As for your photo & video editing, I'd love to hear why even the current iMac is unable to run your needed software, specifically. If I'm running Lightroom and Photoshop on a 2011, why can't you on a new machine?

    Also, it's not true that comparatively-spec'd PCs are cheaper than Macs. In fact the opposite has been shown to be true when building Dell pro desktops. 
    I am running Davinci Resolve. All current Macs have under-specced GPUs for my needs.

    An equally specced Dell Workstation is as expensive as a Mac Pro, but one can get up to date GPUs. And if one chooses to build a custom PC one would pay a fraction of the price of a Dell workstation or Mac Pro.
    I built PCs for years, trying to compare them to a finished product from one company is absurd. When you build a DIY PC you are not getting any support contracts, and no guarantee that the stuff is going to work together without issue. When your vid card and motherboard have issues neither one is going to support you. etc.. There is no AppleCare. 

    Davinci is a video editor, so I'm assuming you're able to use Adobe's products just fine on a mac. As for Davinci I'm not sure sure of its requirements but i'd still be shocked if they didn't work on even the stale Pro. Since, you know, they sell it for the Mac. 
    Regarding the support issue you are right, regarding the Davinci Resolve requirements you are wrong. 4GB of VRAM is barely enough for 4K color grading. Same problem when using Assimilate Scratch etc. The Apple hardware is enough for folks who would like to edit with Premiere or FCPX, but neither program is well suited for proper color grading work. And color grading is essential for professional filmmaking. To Apple it seems to be too slim of a margin. The rational however goes like this: If I have to buy a Windows system for a certain pro task and am getting used to working with Windows, why would I stick to Mac OS for less demanding tasks instead of just buying windows machines for everything? Once my MBP is getting too old this is probably what I'll do. I think Apple could easily afford to offer truly pro grade machines, but they just don't seem to care. So I don't longer care for Apple.
  • Reply 35 of 76

    It's about GPUs, stupid.
    And yet, Davinci Resolve has some features that are Mac OS-only, correct?  I guess those must not matter to you?

    It's about GPUs, stupid.
    And yet, Davinci Resolve has some features that are Mac OS-only, correct?  I guess those must not matter to you?

    Support for the silly touch bar on the new MBPs, yes. But that's an irrelevant feature for someone used to hot key combinations. I don't want to take my eyes of the screen to press the correct section of a touch bar. The other Mac-only feature would be dual GPU support in the free non-studio version of resolve, but that would require the possession of an outdated and overpriced trashcan Mac Pro or a souped up old mac pro which is getting rather long in the tooth regarding its architecture.
  • Reply 36 of 76
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,035member
    Sujeito said:

    I hate how Apple entices their professional customers then abandons them. Or as with the New MacBook Pro strip out pro features and keeps the "pro" moniker.
    Hmm what pro features are being on the new MBP? Legacy ports? Not a pro feature, try again. SD slot? Again not a pro feature since that's a consumer format and all my pro gear is CF anyway. So what, exactly? What feature did they remove that make it non-pro? The network jack? The CD-ROM drive? The floppy?

    Such nonsense. I'm a pro and I love slim notebooks that don't weigh very much, because I write software and use wifi and don't need to plug in any old firewire crap or what have you. Slim is light which makes it easier to move my mobile when I'm, you know, mobile. So please, stop the public crying, it won't get you anywhere. I doubt you even own a new MBP so it's frivolous anyway.
    Still, al this defending Apple is strange. After waiting for years they bring out two MacBooks (I'm not counting the stripped down version) with - well, one might say - somewhat disappointing features. And al the other computer stuff is still waiting at least two years, perhaps even more, for upgrades. I am not talking about a complete new design, just an upgrade. These upgrades happend on a far more frequent base before. So that people complain and don't understand, I get. Doesn't anyone? Why? Why is Apple not on top of things like before? Silently, suddenly, upgrading a complete line of iMacs with the latest and the greatest as was the habit. Why not anymore? So people wonder. Is Apple abandoning the computers? Getting rid of Mac OS X? All very reasonable questions in the light of the recent behavior of Apple. Not? 
    Oh my... it's not about defending apple.  it's about those not being relevant points.

    It's about being amazed at why would someone whine about something they neither use nor are obligated to use. They took their time, and this MacBook line is what they have to show for it. I would argue it's pretty good. Don't like it? Don't use it. Not that hard. That is the point.

    People only complain either because of jealousy or because they really know what the alternative is like and what peace of mind you have to give just for a measly few extra spec numbers that are mostly car salesman talk. I assure you that the few seconds you think you might gain with those specs are thrown overboard once you start troubleshooting a wintel machine. And you will.
    And it's NEVER a scientific argument. It's always about some latest and greatest HW without any consideration for how that HW actually performs a necessary real world task for the given OS and a given app executing a given task.

    What I expect from a reasonable person in a technology field who designs themselves a "pro"—to wit, their livelihood depends on the speed in which a particular task or set of tasks can be run—would be a detailed explanation (at the very least), and ideally a comprehensive writeup with graphs and spreadsheets showing exactly what the CPU and GPU limitations are for the Mac Pro, iMac, MBP. For all we know he only looked at some raw specs and didn't consider the efficiency of the OSes or the apps on those OSes, including OpenCL and other low-level features. All we know is that he mentioned something meaningless like "up to date GPU" when Apple's iDevices have an "up today integrated GPU from Img Tech, but is clearly not the fastest possible option from Img Tech and not the type of GPU in which he's referring. Even for desktop-class, PCIe discrete GPUs there many different modern GPUs of various price ranges, and the most expensive one may not offer the higher performance if your usage isn't inline with its market focus.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 37 of 76


    Ironhead said:

    Ironhead said:
    I'd be much more interested in a description of the reverse switch since I just bought a used Dell workstation for video and photo editing. I maxed it out with components I'd not even be able to put in a Mac, with the exception of an outdated Mac Pro. This is after 25 years of exclusive Mac usage. Back in the day the Mac was a serious offer for people like me. Nowadays I'd pay a multitude for an inferior Apple machine. It's probably my mistake to expect a smart phone company to deliver powerful stationary computers for creative professionals like I ;)
    That was my first thought.
    I GUARANTEE that we aren't running any "Switching to Windows?" articles.
    Obviously.

    Äpfelundbirnen is making some good points though.
    Really, and what would those be? All I've seen are common troll tropes:

    - he's owned macs since steve jobs was born
    - macs are too expensive
    - macs aren't for professionals (and obviously a pro is only whatever it is he does)
    - macs are too slow to run his "photo & video" software (yet Photoshop/Lightroom runs fine, and Davinci Resolve has a Mac version, so...)

    ...still waiting for those good points. 
    Maybe we can agree on this: Before around 2010 Macs where universally pro, though actually with the exception of CAD. Today Macs are semi pro due to putting design before features such as expandability. I used to own a Mac Pro 4.1, I considered buying an iMac or a better specced old Mac Pro but neither were justifiable investments given the hardware limitations. I like Davinci Resolve better than fcpx and Premiere. Whether I run it on a Mac or PC makes no big difference in terms of the interface, but I can plug in multiple GPUs far more powerful and far cheaper than anything on offer by Apple. So I chose to ditch the Mac for my personal professional work because the Mac is not pro any longer by my specs. It might be by yours, but I know quite a few people having gone the same route or facing the same choice.
  • Reply 38 of 76
    I'd be much more interested in a description of the reverse switch since I just bought a used Dell workstation for video and photo editing. I maxed it out with components I'd not even be able to put in a Mac, with the exception of an outdated Mac Pro. This is after 25 years of exclusive Mac usage. Back in the day the Mac was a serious offer for people like me. Nowadays I'd pay a multitude for an inferior Apple machine. It's probably my mistake to expect a smart phone company to deliver powerful stationary computers for creative professionals like I ;)
    Hyperbolic nonsense. I'm a creative professional and my desktop is a 2011 iMac (SSD and plenty of RAM and VRAM), it's still a good machine for software development, running VMs, IDEs, Creative Suite, etc. 

    As for your photo & video editing, I'd love to hear why even the current iMac is unable to run your needed software, specifically. If I'm running Lightroom and Photoshop on a 2011, why can't you on a new machine?

    Also, it's not true that comparatively-spec'd PCs are cheaper than Macs. In fact the opposite has been shown to be true when building Dell pro desktops. 
    You're supposed to define "Pros" as narrowly and selectively as you want to win the argument. Pick some narrow use case where Macs are not the most superlative choice, define "Pros" as that use case, then slam Apple over "obsession with thinness" or "iPhone maker who doesn't know how to make powerful computers." That's how you prove the MacBook Pro is horrible and "Pros" will be switching to Windows en masse.
    SoliSujeitopscooter63watto_cobraai46
  • Reply 39 of 76
    JinTechJinTech Posts: 1,005member
    I'd be much more interested in a description of the reverse switch since I just bought a used Dell workstation for video and photo editing. I maxed it out with components I'd not even be able to put in a Mac, with the exception of an outdated Mac Pro. This is after 25 years of exclusive Mac usage. Back in the day the Mac was a serious offer for people like me. Nowadays I'd pay a multitude for an inferior Apple machine. It's probably my mistake to expect a smart phone company to deliver powerful stationary computers for creative professionals like I ;)
    Hyperbolic nonsense. I'm a creative professional and my desktop is a 2011 iMac (SSD and plenty of RAM and VRAM), it's still a good machine for software development, running VMs, IDEs, Creative Suite, etc. 

    As for your photo & video editing, I'd love to hear why even the current iMac is unable to run your needed software, specifically. If I'm running Lightroom and Photoshop on a 2011, why can't you on a new machine?

    Also, it's not true that comparatively-spec'd PCs are cheaper than Macs. In fact the opposite has been shown to be true when building Dell pro desktops. 
    I second StrangeDays. My editor edited a feature length documentary with up to five camera angles (MultiCam) on a 2011 iMac without SSD and aside from the glitches from Premiere, it was plenty fast (not as fast as it would have with Final Cut Pro but that wasn't an option unfortunately.)
  • Reply 40 of 76
    SujeitoSujeito Posts: 16unconfirmed, member


    Ironhead said:

    Ironhead said:
    I'd be much more interested in a description of the reverse switch since I just bought a used Dell workstation for video and photo editing. I maxed it out with components I'd not even be able to put in a Mac, with the exception of an outdated Mac Pro. This is after 25 years of exclusive Mac usage. Back in the day the Mac was a serious offer for people like me. Nowadays I'd pay a multitude for an inferior Apple machine. It's probably my mistake to expect a smart phone company to deliver powerful stationary computers for creative professionals like I ;)
    That was my first thought.
    I GUARANTEE that we aren't running any "Switching to Windows?" articles.
    Obviously.

    Äpfelundbirnen is making some good points though.
    Really, and what would those be? All I've seen are common troll tropes:

    - he's owned macs since steve jobs was born
    - macs are too expensive
    - macs aren't for professionals (and obviously a pro is only whatever it is he does)
    - macs are too slow to run his "photo & video" software (yet Photoshop/Lightroom runs fine, and Davinci Resolve has a Mac version, so...)

    ...still waiting for those good points. 
    Maybe we can agree on this: Before around 2010 Macs where universally pro, though actually with the exception of CAD. Today Macs are semi pro due to putting design before features such as expandability. I used to own a Mac Pro 4.1, I considered buying an iMac or a better specced old Mac Pro but neither were justifiable investments given the hardware limitations. I like Davinci Resolve better than fcpx and Premiere. Whether I run it on a Mac or PC makes no big difference in terms of the interface, but I can plug in multiple GPUs far more powerful and far cheaper than anything on offer by Apple. So I chose to ditch the Mac for my personal professional work because the Mac is not pro any longer by my specs. It might be by yours, but I know quite a few people having gone the same route or facing the same choice.
    For what particularly works for you, your company, integration or wallet, I have no say in that. Just get the better tool for the job, whatever that might be.

    But about Macs, they are what they always were. Never were about expandability just for the sake of appeasing the mainstream market. Just go through the recent history, there are many examples of adopting some ports whilr dumping others. Some failed, some became standards and some evolved. Not defending Apple, mind you. It's just that pointing fingers into what definitely is not true makes a point on the pointer.

    The way I see it, its the Pro capabilities mixed with the user friendliness  and durability reputation that made them climb the ladder. Never were the reviews on their machines about "superior hardware", nor the talks in stores or between mac users. It was about superior experience, hassle free, getting work done, in a pleasant and pretty way without being an IT guy.  Still doing the same thing.

    They may have a slower refresh on hardware, no surprise there. But again, it's not an outlier from their previous behavior.
    edited February 2017
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