Ultraviolet video streaming service shutting down on July 31

Posted:
in General Discussion
Digital movie locker service Ultraviolet has warned it will be shutting down on July 31, with the rise of the competing Movies Anywhere and other movie storage options thought to have prompted the shutdown of the service.




In an email to consumers, Ultraviolet advises that users will continue to be able to access movies and TV shows through retailers linked to their library, as well as to buy new content and redeem codes as usual, up until its closure at the end of July.

On the shutdown date, the library will automatically close, preventing any further changes from occurring, but bought content will still be accessible via retailers previously linked to the account. While more purchases could be made or film codes redeemed, they are to be performed solely at that retailer, and will not be added to an Ultraviolet library.

The service advises customers to log into their accounts and to select Retailer Services to verify there are online stores linked to the library. It is advised users should not unlink or close their Ultraviolet library, as the service is working with retailers to maintain access to acquired items beyond the closure date.

A warning on Myuv.com advising of the closure
A warning on Myuv.com advising of the closure


While the iTunes store isn't a retailer that worked with Ultraviolet, retailers who do offer access to Ultraviolet collections do have their own iOS apps for streaming, meaning that some iOS users will be affected by the closure.

Approximately 30 million users are signed up to Ultravioet, and collectively store more than 300 million movies and TV shows via the service.

Speaking to Variety, Digital Entertainment Content Ecosystem (DECE) president Wendy Aylsworth advised the decision was caused through the changing market for online services. "The marketplace for collecting entertainment content was very small when Ultraviolet started," advised Aylsworth. "It was siloed into walled gardens at the time."

Ultraviolet formed in 2011 with the support from most major Hollywood studios, bar Disney. Codes included in DVDs and Blu-ray discs offered to provide a digital version that could be watched online, introducing some users to the idea of streaming video for their paid content at a relatively early point in the life of the general paid streaming market.

Its biggest competitor is the Disney-produced Movies Anywhere, which has gained support from the studios that worked with Ultraviolet, with some deciding to cease distributing via Ultraviolet last year. Movies Anywhere crucially also included support for some major digital retailers that didn't work with Ultraviolet, including Apple's iTunes store alongside other major players Amazon and Google Play.

While the success of the Disney competitor may have contributed to its downfall, Aylsworth claims the decision to shutter Ultraviolet "doesn't really have anything to do with Movies Anywhere."
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 32
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,553member
    While it appears that any movies you own will still be available this just highlights the issue of owning or renting. What happens when the company you bought movies or music from decides to quit or goes out of business? iTunes shows no sign of being doomed (well, the usual suspects say it is) but you never know do you. I currently have a library of purchased movies spread across iTunes, Vudu, and Amazon Prime so we’re talking Apple, Walmart, and Amazon. Not much to worry about there.

    What are other’s takes on owning or renting?
    jbdragon
  • Reply 2 of 32
    christophbchristophb Posts: 1,477member
    lkrupp said:
    While it appears that any movies you own will still be available this just highlights the issue of owning or renting. What happens when the company you bought movies or music from decides to quit or goes out of business? iTunes shows no sign of being doomed (well, the usual suspects say it is) but you never know do you. I currently have a library of purchased movies spread across iTunes, Vudu, and Amazon Prime so we’re talking Apple, Walmart, and Amazon. Not much to worry about there.

    What are other’s takes on owning or renting?
    Any video content I want to be safe from out-of-business I buy on physical media which usually comes with an iTunes, Vudu or UV code.   Same goes for music.   I never did count on these streaming companies not getting hurt by the content owners shifting policy and parent company.  Even Movies Anywhere might be impacted soon with the Disney acquisition of 21st Century Fox.  It started with five studios with relatively equal stake.  Now it's 2/5 Disney.  I can imagine AT&T wanting it's own streaming service and pulling Warner content.

    No good answer for those who don't have the means to store a large volume of physical media.
  • Reply 3 of 32
    davendaven Posts: 626member
    lkrupp said:
    While it appears that any movies you own will still be available this just highlights the issue of owning or renting. What happens when the company you bought movies or music from decides to quit or goes out of business? iTunes shows no sign of being doomed (well, the usual suspects say it is) but you never know do you. I currently have a library of purchased movies spread across iTunes, Vudu, and Amazon Prime so we’re talking Apple, Walmart, and Amazon. Not much to worry about there.

    What are other’s takes on owning or renting?
    This isn't owning vs renting but owning a hard copy vs owning a digital copy not saved on your local drive. I signed up for Ultraviolet and Movies Anywhere. The reason I signed up was that it gave me a way to redeem a digital version of the few DVDs I own so I could watch them on the road without carrying those 'big bulky dads' with me (sarcasm). The reality for me is that there are very few movies I want to watch over and over and therefore have a reason to own. There is a lot of great content out there (mostly old movies in my case) and I don't have a desire to see the same thing over and over.

    There are pitfalls to owning too. Try watching a VCR version of a movie if you still have a working VCR. You may cringe at the quality. And what happens when your VCR breaks? Are they still making them? When I was in my 20s I was looking for an entertainment system so I splurged on a Laserdisk player. The sound and video quality blew away VCR material but the nearest store that rented or sold Laserdisks was about an hour away. Few disks were rented so I ended up buying a few (three or four I think). A few years later DVDs came out which put an end to Laserdisks though arguably Laserdisks had higher video quality. A few years after that, my Laserdisk play broke and there were no replacements. I donated the Laserdisks I had to Goodwill and maybe they found a new home for a while.

    If you really want to own, own a copy you can save on your drive. I think iTunes is the only service that lets you save a local copy. That works well for me when I'm traveling. But I don't use it for buying. I'll rent a few movies before hitting the road, download them for the 30 day watch period, and hit the road. As long as I'm within a good wifi or cell service when I'm remote camping in my RV, I can reload movies.

    So that is what I think. For me, renting, especially being able to rent with a 30 day download, is the way I watch almost all the movies I see.
    randominternetperson
  • Reply 4 of 32
    jbdragonjbdragon Posts: 2,246member
    This is why I don't buy Digital Movies from anyone. I will buy the movie on Disc and RIP IT myself and put it up on my NAS to watch anywhere using PLEX. Then it's all under my own control. I have the Physical Disc as backup put away in one of my large Disc binders.

    In this case, you would have bought the physical media and gotten a Ultraviolet Code which you would enter to get a digital copy to watch. So you should still have that Physical Media and not really losing anything in this case.

    So long as I have Internet service, I can watch all my Movies anywhere in the world. It's like my own personal Netflix service. But I can also have PLEX transcode movies to a format for my iPad and dump them to my iPad. Using the Plex app on my iPad, I can grab a bunch of movies from my NAS and have them right on my iPad to watch anywhere without having to have Internet access and stream them. Just watch directly. The last time I was camping, Wifi over at my Campsite was almost worthless. I could about get my e-mails, but streaming, HAHAHA. But if I'm on a plane, or I go to my Moms House for the weekend, and where she lives in the boonies where there is no high speed Internet, I just dump a number of movies on my iPad. I just don't trust any of this digital movie stuff. Anything out there in the CLOUD not under my control can disappear.
    edited January 2019 cgWerks
  • Reply 5 of 32
    If you "own" any movies with UV, the most important thing here is: Sync UV up with Vudu and then sync Vudu up with Movies Anywhere (and any of the retailers, including Apple, you use in their list). And if you have the option (and the space) to download those movies and back them up (in iTunes, for example), I would. There are some movies that won't follow to MoviesAnywhere (Paramount, Lionsgate, and MGM aren't participants), but (on an Apple TV, for instance) you can rely on Vudu for those (though, of course, that assumes the service continues). In terms of owning vs renting: I personally think you should have physical media versions of anything you value (I also have a working VCR and LaserDisc player and an analog 480i CRT TV for the really old stuff). I've picked up a couple digital copies of movies very cheap or free here and there, but my digital copies are solely for convenience and I would never rely on those to be my sole copies of something I love.
    christophb
  • Reply 6 of 32
    AppleExposedAppleExposed Posts: 1,805unconfirmed, member
    Hahaha

    I used to browse Google+ code communities and the UV crowd(anti-Apple) would bash Apple so much! I was there to pick up the "crappy iTunes" HD version of movies for Free-$5. Before 4K upgrades came and prices skyrocketed.

    They praised the copycat UV as superior. 2 years later both UV and Google+ shut down.

    I always get the last laugh but never get the chance to laugh in their faces as I will have a hard time finding them just to say "HaHa" (Nelson voice).

    jbdragon said:
    This is why I don't buy Digital Movies from anyone. I will buy the movie on Disc and RIP IT myself and put it up on my NAS to watch anywhere using PLEX. Then it's all under my own control. I have the Physical Disc as backup put away in one of my large Disc binders.

    In this case, you would have bought the physical media and gotten a Ultraviolet Code which you would enter to get a digital copy to watch. So you should still have that Physical Media and not really losing anything in this case.

    So long as I have Internet service, I can watch all my Movies anywhere in the world. It's like my own personal Netflix service.
    With iTunes I got about $2000 worth of 4K upgrades. So there's a positive to everything if you look. DVDs have to be re-bought for higher quality and HDR/Dolby Vision/Atmos support is a mess.

    My iTunes is also like a personal "Netflix" with a much, much higher quality library. Heck 99% of my movies scored 80 or above on Rotten Tomatoes.

    Physical sucks. They scratch, get lost, take up massive space. I cringe now when I see bookshelves full of DVDs in peoples homes. I'm thinking "I have more movies in my pocket!".

    I stopped buying physical when my entire media collection was stolen. I went iTunes and never looked back. I got convenience, free 4K, Dolby Vision, Dolby Atmos and a better interface in return.
  • Reply 7 of 32
    I haven't had the time to research this yet (and I'd rather not have to): if we can see our UV movies in Movies Anywhere (and therefore in iTunes), do I have to do anything?  Will I lose anything when UV goes poof?  
  • Reply 8 of 32
    AppleExposedAppleExposed Posts: 1,805unconfirmed, member
    I haven't had the time to research this yet (and I'd rather not have to): if we can see our UV movies in Movies Anywhere (and therefore in iTunes), do I have to do anything?  Will I lose anything when UV goes poof?  
    iTunes should keep your movies.

    Just don't expect 4K/future upgrades from UV-redeemed movies on iTunes.
  • Reply 9 of 32
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 11,689member
    So how stable does Vudu seem? $2 to convert my old DVDs to cloud digital copies doesn’t sound bad...but that doesn’t link it to a iTunes library, just the Vudu library, from the sound of it. But if you also sign up for Movies Anywhere, and then link that to both your Vudu and iTunes accounts...it should. About right?

    I signed up to them and scanned a test DVD, visible in Vudu but hasn’t synced across to MA & iTunes yet. (Edit: as described by WS below, this is due to the movie not being offered in Movies Anywhere).
    edited January 2019
  • Reply 10 of 32
    So how stable does Vudu seem? $2 to convert my old DVDs to cloud digital copies doesn’t sound bad...but that doesn’t link it to a iTunes library, just the Vudu library, from the sound of it, right?
    Movies that are owned by a company participating in Movies Anywhere will sync to all retailers you have linked to Movies Anywhere.  So, link Vudu and iTunes to Movies Anywhere and anything you buy in either one will appear in the other, including Disc-to-Digital... assuming they are participating in Movies Anywhere.  I have a substantial library of DVDs and a handful of BluRays.  I opted to use Vudu's Disc-to-Digital offering and love it.  It can add up if you have a lot of movies but it is far less expensive than re-purchasing them directly.  The upside is you now have both a physical and digital copy and even if Vudu goes under, you have the iTunes version which is labeled as "purchased" by Apple - and you can download it.

    There are a few caveats:

    1) Not all movies will "convert".  For example, Disney and it's subsidiaries don't allow for conversions.
    2) To convert from SD (DVD) to HD (BluRay) it is actually $5.  Same to same is just $2.
    3) Paramount, Lionsgate and MGM do not participate in Movies Anywhere at this time so if you convert one of their films is will not show up anywhere but Vudu.  Hopefully they'll jump on board soon.
    4) To get the free 4k upgrade on the Apple TV, you have to buy a HD or 4k movie on iTunes and any HD movies later updated to offer 4k will be upgraded for free.  You can also buy 4k elsewhere and iTunes will honor that as well if they have a 4k version.  So Disc-to-Digital HD will not get you a free 4k upgrade in iTunes.
    randominternetperson
  • Reply 11 of 32
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 11,689member
    So how stable does Vudu seem? $2 to convert my old DVDs to cloud digital copies doesn’t sound bad...but that doesn’t link it to a iTunes library, just the Vudu library, from the sound of it, right?
    Movies that are owned by a company participating in Movies Anywhere will sync to all retailers you have linked to Movies Anywhere.  So, link Vudu and iTunes to Movies Anywhere and anything you buy in either one will appear in the other, including Disc-to-Digital... assuming they are participating in Movies Anywhere.  I have a substantial library of DVDs and a handful of BluRays.  I opted to use Vudu's Disc-to-Digital offering and love it.  It can add up if you have a lot of movies but it is far less expensive than re-purchasing them directly.  The upside is you now have both a physical and digital copy and even if Vudu goes under, you have the iTunes version which is labeled as "purchased" by Apple - and you can download it.

    There are a few caveats:

    1) Not all movies will "convert".  For example, Disney and it's subsidiaries don't allow for conversions.
    2) To convert from SD (DVD) to HD (BluRay) it is actually $5.  Same to same is just $2.
    3) Paramount, Lionsgate and MGM do not participate in Movies Anywhere at this time so if you convert one of their films is will not show up anywhere but Vudu.  Hopefully they'll jump on board soon.
    4) To get the free 4k upgrade on the Apple TV, you have to buy a HD or 4k movie on iTunes and any HD movies later updated to offer 4k will be upgraded for free.  You can also buy 4k elsewhere and iTunes will honor that as well if they have a 4k version.  So Disc-to-Digital HD will not get you a free 4k upgrade in iTunes.
    Thanks, I signed up and discovered that...Not all the movies you can convert in Vudu are supported by the Movies Anywhere linking service. And not all your movies are supported by Vudu either. 

    That being said, for 2 bucks I'll convert my old DVDs to the service and get rid of the discs (I'm done carrying around boxes of media)

    So it sounds like you're saying any Vudu scans that are supported by MA and are added to my iTunes library are added their *permanently*, even if MA goes away? Surprised Apple would offer that. 

    Little confused about the 4k upgrade. Are you saying that if you buy any old random 4k title on iTunes (unrelated to your Vudu scanning), that Apple will then upgrade all of your eligible purchase history items to 4k?
  • Reply 12 of 32
    davendaven Posts: 626member
    Little confused about the 4k upgrade. Are you saying that if you buy any old random 4k title on iTunes (unrelated to your Vudu scanning), that Apple will then upgrade all of your eligible purchase history items to 4k?
    I think what he is saying, and I have done this, is Vudu (or is it Movies Anywhere) lets you scan the DVD cover and for $2 you get a digital version. Then if you link your Vudu/Movies Anywhere accounts to iTunes, iTunes gives you a 4k upgrade for movies that support it. I've linked my accounts and it is pretty nice that most studios, Apple, Walmart, etc. got together on this. It allows users to use more than one service while keeping the movies under digital rights.
  • Reply 13 of 32
    AppleExposedAppleExposed Posts: 1,805unconfirmed, member
    So how stable does Vudu seem? $2 to convert my old DVDs to cloud digital copies doesn’t sound bad...but that doesn’t link it to a iTunes library, just the Vudu library, from the sound of it, right?
    Movies that are owned by a company participating in Movies Anywhere will sync to all retailers you have linked to Movies Anywhere.  So, link Vudu and iTunes to Movies Anywhere and anything you buy in either one will appear in the other, including Disc-to-Digital... assuming they are participating in Movies Anywhere.  I have a substantial library of DVDs and a handful of BluRays.  I opted to use Vudu's Disc-to-Digital offering and love it.  It can add up if you have a lot of movies but it is far less expensive than re-purchasing them directly.  The upside is you now have both a physical and digital copy and even if Vudu goes under, you have the iTunes version which is labeled as "purchased" by Apple - and you can download it.

    There are a few caveats:

    1) Not all movies will "convert".  For example, Disney and it's subsidiaries don't allow for conversions.
    2) To convert from SD (DVD) to HD (BluRay) it is actually $5.  Same to same is just $2.
    3) Paramount, Lionsgate and MGM do not participate in Movies Anywhere at this time so if you convert one of their films is will not show up anywhere but Vudu.  Hopefully they'll jump on board soon.
    4) To get the free 4k upgrade on the Apple TV, you have to buy a HD or 4k movie on iTunes and any HD movies later updated to offer 4k will be upgraded for free.  You can also buy 4k elsewhere and iTunes will honor that as well if they have a 4k version.  So Disc-to-Digital HD will not get you a free 4k upgrade in iTunes.
    Thanks, I signed up and discovered that...Not all the movies you can convert in Vudu are supported by the Movies Anywhere linking service. And not all your movies are supported by Vudu either. 

    That being said, for 2 bucks I'll convert my old DVDs to the service and get rid of the discs (I'm done carrying around boxes of media)

    So it sounds like you're saying any Vudu scans that are supported by MA and are added to my iTunes library are added their *permanently*, even if MA goes away? Surprised Apple would offer that. 

    Little confused about the 4k upgrade. Are you saying that if you buy any old random 4k title on iTunes (unrelated to your Vudu scanning), that Apple will then upgrade all of your eligible purchase history items to 4k?
    Codes redeemed through iTunes also upgrade to 4K.
    edited January 2019
  • Reply 14 of 32
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 11,689member
    daven said:
    Little confused about the 4k upgrade. Are you saying that if you buy any old random 4k title on iTunes (unrelated to your Vudu scanning), that Apple will then upgrade all of your eligible purchase history items to 4k?
    I think what he is saying, and I have done this, is Vudu (or is it Movies Anywhere) lets you scan the DVD cover and for $2 you get a digital version. Then if you link your Vudu/Movies Anywhere accounts to iTunes, iTunes gives you a 4k upgrade for movies that support it. 
    Yeah we'll see. I scanned a bunch and many of them made it thru to iTunes, but none of them have the "4K" or even "HD" tag in my iTunes Library (accessed via Apple TV iTunes). A while back I did purchase a movie that came in 4k and it does have the "4K" icon, and another recent movie purchase has the "HD" tag...but the Vudu scans only come over as SD. I'm guessing you have to pay for Vudu's $5 HD scan for it to be sent to iTunes with the HD-version flag. I haven't tried it yet tho.

    But for $2, they're as good as the DVD I suppose. (Tho many DVD players up-sample SD discs somehow)
    edited January 2019
  • Reply 15 of 32
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 11,689member

    So how stable does Vudu seem? $2 to convert my old DVDs to cloud digital copies doesn’t sound bad...but that doesn’t link it to a iTunes library, just the Vudu library, from the sound of it, right?
    Movies that are owned by a company participating in Movies Anywhere will sync to all retailers you have linked to Movies Anywhere.  So, link Vudu and iTunes to Movies Anywhere and anything you buy in either one will appear in the other, including Disc-to-Digital... assuming they are participating in Movies Anywhere.  I have a substantial library of DVDs and a handful of BluRays.  I opted to use Vudu's Disc-to-Digital offering and love it.  It can add up if you have a lot of movies but it is far less expensive than re-purchasing them directly.  The upside is you now have both a physical and digital copy and even if Vudu goes under, you have the iTunes version which is labeled as "purchased" by Apple - and you can download it.

    There are a few caveats:

    1) Not all movies will "convert".  For example, Disney and it's subsidiaries don't allow for conversions.
    2) To convert from SD (DVD) to HD (BluRay) it is actually $5.  Same to same is just $2.
    3) Paramount, Lionsgate and MGM do not participate in Movies Anywhere at this time so if you convert one of their films is will not show up anywhere but Vudu.  Hopefully they'll jump on board soon.
    4) To get the free 4k upgrade on the Apple TV, you have to buy a HD or 4k movie on iTunes and any HD movies later updated to offer 4k will be upgraded for free.  You can also buy 4k elsewhere and iTunes will honor that as well if they have a 4k version.  So Disc-to-Digital HD will not get you a free 4k upgrade in iTunes.
    Thanks, I signed up and discovered that...Not all the movies you can convert in Vudu are supported by the Movies Anywhere linking service. And not all your movies are supported by Vudu either. 

    That being said, for 2 bucks I'll convert my old DVDs to the service and get rid of the discs (I'm done carrying around boxes of media)

    So it sounds like you're saying any Vudu scans that are supported by MA and are added to my iTunes library are added their *permanently*, even if MA goes away? Surprised Apple would offer that. 

    Little confused about the 4k upgrade. Are you saying that if you buy any old random 4k title on iTunes (unrelated to your Vudu scanning), that Apple will then upgrade all of your eligible purchase history items to 4k?
    Codes redeemed through iTunes also upgrade to 4K.
    Yeah this isn't that tho, I'm not redeeming codes in iTunes, I'm using the Vudu desktop app to scan old DVDs. So far they only seem to come in as SD, which I suppose is fine since the DVDs themselves are only 720x480.

    I only have one BluRay with an Ultraviolet redemption disc & code, I never redeemed it before (didn't realize iTunes redeemed them natively). Tried today but it's outdated or such, iTunes fails to verify the code. Meh.
  • Reply 16 of 32
    davgregdavgreg Posts: 900member
    What are other’s takes on owning or renting?
    Unless I have no other option I buy BluRays and archive them in digital format. Have a ProBox with 4 HDs full of movies that can be watched on any device in the house.

    My understanding of most digital services is that you do not own the movie- you own a license to watch the movie and cannot leave it to someone when you die. If you own physical media you can.
  • Reply 17 of 32
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 3,430member
    lkrupp said:
    While it appears that any movies you own will still be available this just highlights the issue of owning or renting. What happens when the company you bought movies or music from decides to quit or goes out of business? iTunes shows no sign of being doomed (well, the usual suspects say it is) but you never know do you. I currently have a library of purchased movies spread across iTunes, Vudu, and Amazon Prime so we’re talking Apple, Walmart, and Amazon. Not much to worry about there.

    What are other’s takes on owning or renting?
    Physical media for the win. Actually, I’m poor, so I don’t buy much of anything. I would buy blue ray discs of things I really like re-watching and just rent things for one-off viewing experiences.

     I don’t rent or subscribe to much of anything either. I hate subscription services. Netflix gets a pass because it slipped in under the “I have no TV service” clause, years ago (originally as a DVD rental service), and I’ve enjoyed watching shows on it year after year. I absolutely refuse to add more and more streaming services. No, it’s not good for consumers that every damned studio thinks it needs a piece of the streaming pie. 
    cgWerks
  • Reply 18 of 32
    daven said:
    Little confused about the 4k upgrade. Are you saying that if you buy any old random 4k title on iTunes (unrelated to your Vudu scanning), that Apple will then upgrade all of your eligible purchase history items to 4k?
    I think what he is saying, and I have done this, is Vudu (or is it Movies Anywhere) lets you scan the DVD cover and for $2 you get a digital version. Then if you link your Vudu/Movies Anywhere accounts to iTunes, iTunes gives you a 4k upgrade for movies that support it. 
    Yeah we'll see. I scanned a bunch and many of them made it thru to iTunes, but none of them have the "4K" or even "HD" tag in my iTunes Library (accessed via Apple TV iTunes). A while back I did purchase a movie that came in 4k and it does have the "4K" icon, and another recent movie purchase has the "HD" tag...but the Vudu scans only come over as SD. I'm guessing you have to pay for Vudu's $5 HD scan for it to be sent to iTunes with the HD-version flag. I haven't tried it yet tho.

    But for $2, they're as good as the DVD I suppose. (Tho many DVD players up-sample SD discs somehow)
    I've scanned a bunch of movies through the Vudu app. In order to get an HD copy, you need to scan blu ray discs. Most of the ones I scanned were blu ray discs before they started coming with digital copies. It's $2 for HD copy from blu ray. If you are scanning DVD's, you have to pay $5 if you want an HD digital copy. 
    stompy
  • Reply 19 of 32
    lkrupp said:
    While it appears that any movies you own will still be available this just highlights the issue of owning or renting. What happens when the company you bought movies or music from decides to quit or goes out of business? iTunes shows no sign of being doomed (well, the usual suspects say it is) but you never know do you. I currently have a library of purchased movies spread across iTunes, Vudu, and Amazon Prime so we’re talking Apple, Walmart, and Amazon. Not much to worry about there.

    What are other’s takes on owning or renting?
    I buy movies through iTunes and download them. In one case, a movie I downloaded was corrupted by a failing hard drive. I went to the iTunes Store to download it again and found the title is no longer available through iTunes. There's now no record that I ever bought it.
  • Reply 20 of 32
    Movies Anywhere is a great idea. So is Vudu's disc digitization service. Have any of you who live in Canada found similar alternatives that are available here?

    Vudu let me sign up, but I get only "login error" when I try to sign in. Annoying.
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