If you plan on using your new M1 iMac with a VESA mount, make sure to buy the right model

Posted:
in Current Mac Hardware
Apple is selling its new iMac in both a standalone version and a VESA-compatible variant, meaning users who want to use their own mounts should ensure they select the right model.

Credit: Apple
Credit: Apple


The Cupertino tech giant on Tuesday announced a brand-new 24-inch iMac refresh equipped with an M1 chip, significantly updated audio and video capabilities, and a host of other features.

As with previous iMac models, the standard version of the iMac comes with a built-in stand for users wanting a simple desk setup. However, users who want to use their own mounting system should take care not to purchase the model with a stand.

Instead, Apple has a 24-inch iMac with a built-in VESA mount adapter. With a standard four-screw mount on the rear, users can install the VESA variant on a variety of arms or brackets.

The VESA-compatible iMac is available in the same configurations as the standard model. All VESA configurations are also priced the same as their stand-equipped counterparts.

Additionally, users should note that the entry-level 24-inch iMac only comes in Blue, Green, Pink, and Silver. The higher-priced tiers are available in the other colors, Yellow, Orange, and Purple.

Other model differences include the lack of two additional USB-C ports on the cheapest iMac. That model is only equipped with two Thunderbolt 3 ports, whereas the more expensive variants have an additional pair of USB-C ports.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 14
    Now, that's good news for the future bigger brother.
  • Reply 2 of 14
    Good to hear!  My last three 27" iMacs have been mounted to a VESA arm.  I'm happy to see that VESA mounting will remain an option.

    It will be interesting to see what the cost is for 8GB of additional RAM.  Apple is notorious for overcharging for RAM and all of the new M1-based machines cannot be upgraded after purchase.  For the M1-based laptops, it's $200 for another 8GB.  My previous 27" iMac had 32GB and my current 2019 model has 64GB installed (by me).  Apple currently charges $1000 for the 64GB upgrade (total rip off).  OWC currently charges $347.  The SSD upgrades are not cheap either.  The future, bigger Apple Silicon iMacs could be REALLY expensive.
    edited April 20 ApplePoorwatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 14
    The 13: MacBook Air, 13" Mac Book Pro and 2020 Mac mini had the same M1 chip being touted now for a new iMac and the new 11" and 12.9" iPads. The same apparent limitations are also carried over of a max memory of 16GB and a max SSD capacity of 2TB in all of these devices. The 16GB memory restriction prevents the Mac mini use as a file server and there are many photo management programs that could use even 64GB of Ram to be more effective. The iPad performance gains were compared back to the first iPad. Really not that much better performance than the last years iPad except for the 2TB of storage. The big losers were the customers and their wallets. Not any of the M1 equipment has any user serviceable parts other than the choice of a trash can to dispose of it. A price comparison of the 13" MacBook Pro M1 loaded with max memory and SSD against the 12.9" iPad loaded with max memory, 5G and 2TB storage shows the iPad $100 more expensive than the laptop.
  • Reply 4 of 14
    Judging from tests and reviews 16gb ram will be sufficient for a significant number of the typical users of the previous models and M1/16gb have extended that user base quite a bit. Thus, it would be easy to agree that they have hit bullseye with these entry models. 

    For my usage both Mac mini and MacBook Air/Pro suddenly became highly relevant, although 2 ports will be on the short side.

    I believe the focus on 16gb RAM limit is exaggerated if comparing with the intel models, and both synthetic and "pro" application performance tests seems to prove that. 

    I´m sure there will be plenty of "pro" models covering pro needs when M1 has uncovered any flaws with M1 or macOS.

    Pricing and costs? It's Apple. You got to live with it. Or not.

  • Reply 5 of 14
    22july201322july2013 Posts: 2,510member
    If I get a VESA mount that supports 90 degree rotation into portrait mode, will macOS on this iMac let me rotate the screen? Or will it detect the rotation and auto-rotate?
  • Reply 6 of 14
    If I get a VESA mount that supports 90 degree rotation into portrait mode, will macOS on this iMac let me rotate the screen? Or will it detect the rotation and auto-rotate?
    That's a really interesting question.  I'm wondering if that fancy magnetic power cable will disconnect when the iMac is moved around on a VESA arm.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 14
    22july201322july2013 Posts: 2,510member
    macinfish said:
    If I get a VESA mount that supports 90 degree rotation into portrait mode, will macOS on this iMac let me rotate the screen? Or will it detect the rotation and auto-rotate?
    That's a really interesting question.  I'm wondering if that fancy magnetic power cable will disconnect when the iMac is moved around on a VESA arm.
    My theory is that the reason they removed the Apple logo from the front is that they now support portrait mode, and the logo would look stupid turned sideways.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 14
    So many confusing choices with this woefully underwhelming imac. I really hope they do better with an imac pro or by allowing the very impressive, very good ipad pro update to run macOS. 
  • Reply 9 of 14
    I forgot to mention that while the 12.9” iPad is $100 more expensive than the loaded 13” Mac Book Pro M1, that is before the Apple keyboard, mouse, trackpad and pen are considered.  Currently do not have a spare $3,000 laying around for a first generation machine with SSD concerns and not enough memory for some applications. Hopefully the M1 is not a one trick pony and there are more powerful and useful processors coming soon.
  • Reply 10 of 14
    crowleycrowley Posts: 8,712member
    macinfish said:
    If I get a VESA mount that supports 90 degree rotation into portrait mode, will macOS on this iMac let me rotate the screen? Or will it detect the rotation and auto-rotate?
    That's a really interesting question.  I'm wondering if that fancy magnetic power cable will disconnect when the iMac is moved around on a VESA arm.
    You can rotate the display on most Macs in System Preferences if you hold Command+Option when you click Displays.

    If Apple don't have rotation detection (I doubt they will, but maybe) then you could probably use AppleScript to create some shortcuts for changing the preference if you really needed to.
  • Reply 11 of 14
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 11,558member
    ApplePoor said:
    The 13: MacBook Air, 13" Mac Book Pro and 2020 Mac mini had the same M1 chip being touted now for a new iMac and the new 11" and 12.9" iPads. The same apparent limitations are also carried over of a max memory of 16GB and a max SSD capacity of 2TB in all of these devices. The 16GB memory restriction prevents the Mac mini use as a file server and there are many photo management programs that could use even 64GB of Ram to be more effective. The iPad performance gains were compared back to the first iPad. Really not that much better performance than the last years iPad except for the 2TB of storage. The big losers were the customers and their wallets. Not any of the M1 equipment has any user serviceable parts other than the choice of a trash can to dispose of it. A price comparison of the 13" MacBook Pro M1 loaded with max memory and SSD against the 12.9" iPad loaded with max memory, 5G and 2TB storage shows the iPad $100 more expensive than the laptop.
    Huh? I’ve been using computers with less as file servers for decades.  
    kurai_kagewatto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 14
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 11,558member

    So many confusing choices with this woefully underwhelming imac. I really hope they do better with an imac pro or by allowing the very impressive, very good ipad pro update to run macOS
    LOL you must be new. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 14
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 11,558member
    VESA mount support is super. I’ve been mounting my iMacs on VESA arms for years and love it — gives me my entire desk surface and with a wireless keyboard & mouse sports a real clean look for my office. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 14
    nicholfdnicholfd Posts: 620member
    ApplePoor said:
    The 13: MacBook Air, 13" Mac Book Pro and 2020 Mac mini had the same M1 chip being touted now for a new iMac and the new 11" and 12.9" iPads. The same apparent limitations are also carried over of a max memory of 16GB and a max SSD capacity of 2TB in all of these devices. The 16GB memory restriction prevents the Mac mini use as a file server and there are many photo management programs that could use even 64GB of Ram to be more effective. The iPad performance gains were compared back to the first iPad. Really not that much better performance than the last years iPad except for the 2TB of storage. The big losers were the customers and their wallets. Not any of the M1 equipment has any user serviceable parts other than the choice of a trash can to dispose of it. A price comparison of the 13" MacBook Pro M1 loaded with max memory and SSD against the 12.9" iPad loaded with max memory, 5G and 2TB storage shows the iPad $100 more expensive than the laptop.
    Why?  File servers do not need a lot of memory.  I speak from professional experience.

    And the iPad has 5G ($200 option) and the iPad has a MUCH better display.  CPU/Storage/Memory performance is probably comparable.
    watto_cobraDetnator
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