Apple asks employees to conduct limited in-office work starting in September

Posted:
in General Discussion edited June 2
Apple CEO Tim Cook in an email on Wednesday asked employees to return to office work for three days a week starting in September, a sign that the company is slowly easing back toward normal corporate operations.

Apple Park


In an email seen by The Verge, Cook said most staff are expected to come into the office on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, leaving Wednesday and Friday as optional work from home days. Those who are part of teams that require face-to-face time are being asked to come in for four to five days a week, the report said.

"For all that we've been able to achieve while many of us have been separated, the truth is that there has been something essential missing from this past year: each other," Cook said. "Video conference calling has narrowed the distance between us, to be sure, but there are things it simply cannot replicate."

Employees who have grown accustomed to the work from home lifestyle will be able to remote in for up to two weeks a year, dependent on approval from team managers.

Cook and other senior executives have repeatedly stated in past interviews that remote work is no substitute for in-person attendance. The company has long believed that employee commingling is a vital ingredient to innovation. Late Apple cofounder Steve Jobs was such a proponent of the philosophy that he helped design Apple Park's main building -- effectively a large ring -- to facilitate serendipitous encounters.

Apple first lobbed the idea of remote work for Cupertino staff in March 2020, as the coronavirus pandemic took hold across the nation. Since then, the company has taken steps to protect its workers, including offering paid time off for vaccinations. Cook again urged employees to get vaccinated in Wednesday's email.

"I know I'm not alone in missing the hum of activity, the energy, creativity and collaboration of our in-person meetings and the sense of community we've all built," Cook said.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 23
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 5,159member
    I think a lot of companies will start phasing employees back into the office. I know mine is going to start doing the same around September'ish when the kids go back to school. 
    byronl
  • Reply 2 of 23
    mpantonempantone Posts: 1,576member
    Not surprised.

    Today driving down 101, I was surprised to see a full-size corporate commuter coach, the first one I've seen in over 14 months. When I passed it I noted that it belonged to WeDriveU, one of the big shuttle operators. Once it showed up in my rear view mirror, I could see that it was a training bus, not carrying actual passengers. And a few days earlier, I saw a smaller Bauer IT shuttle bus (they were early shuttle service providers for Google), probably also in training.

    But it's coming. I'm sure a lot of the other big companies (Google, Facebook, etc.) will be asking their employees for more in-person facetime.

    One of the freeway onramps had a sign indicating that metering would start in a few days, presumably because Caltrans expects more traffic when California opens up on June 15th.
    edited June 2
  • Reply 3 of 23
    dee_deedee_dee Posts: 66member
    mpantone said:
    Not surprised.

    Today driving down 101, I was surprised to see a full-size corporate commuter coach, the first one I've seen in over 14 months. When I passed it I noted that it belonged to WeDriveU, one of the big shuttle operators. Once it showed up in my rear view mirror, I could see that it was a training bus, not carrying actual passengers. And a few days earlier, I saw a smaller Bauer IT shuttle bus (they were early shuttle service providers for Google), probably also in training.

    But it's coming. I'm sure a lot of the other big companies (Google, Facebook, etc.) will be asking their employees for more in-person facetime.

    One of the freeway onramps had a sign indicating that metering would start in a few days, presumably because Caltrans expects more traffic when California opens up on June 15th.
    Facebook is allowing remote work after the pandemic. Google is allowing 20% of its workforce to work remote.  Twitter is going fully remote.  Most tech companies are and it’s going to be harder moving forward for Apple to hire software developers if you have to come into campus. 
    byronl
  • Reply 4 of 23
    JWSCJWSC Posts: 935member
    Some jobs lend themselves to a remote working environment.  But more creative occupations where you are working in a team environment really require face-to-face collaboration.  Zoom doesn’t cut it.

    The pandemic response has created new opportunities to work from home and some jobs will shift from office to home permanently.  But the pendulum has swung too far towards remote work.  Many companies have seen significant productivity drops this past year and are in the process of correcting that problem.  So while Silicon Valley continues it myopic pursuit of remote work, by virtue of the fact that the majority work on a computer, much of the rest of the country is rapidly returning to normal in-person work.  And that’s a very good thing.

    Just because you can work from home doesn’t mean you should.  Lack of visibility can be career limiting.
    edited June 3 right_said_fred
  • Reply 5 of 23
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,283member
    Some people continued to thrive working from home. Others did not. Some people need personal contact, interaction, camaraderie, and Zoom/Teams doesn’t do it for them. Working from home isn’t the utopia some say it is.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 6 of 23
    xbitxbit Posts: 297member
    In hindsight, Apple chose the wrong time to build a very expensive and flashy new office building.
  • Reply 7 of 23
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,283member
    xbit said:
    In hindsight, Apple chose the wrong time to build a very expensive and flashy new office building.
    It doesn’t get more ignorant than your comment. Haters gonna hate.
  • Reply 8 of 23
    hmlongcohmlongco Posts: 300member
    JWSC said:
    Many companies have seen significant productivity drops this past year and are in the process of correcting that problem.  So while Silicon Valley continues it myopic pursuit of remote work, by virtue of the fact that the majority work on a computer, much of the rest of the country is rapidly returning to normal in-person work.  
    Got a citation to go along with that? Because from what I've seen many employers seem to be benefiting from increased employee productivity since a lot of them are gaining the additional employee time saved from committing. And some literally had nothing else to do.

    Work from home has pros and cons. Plus some people get off on face-to-face interaction, while others find it exhausting.

    But the biggest complaints like yours that I've seen are from "managers" who can't believe that their employees are actually working unless they're sitting directly under their watchful stare. They just know that "they" would slack off if given the chance, so everyone else MUST be doing so.
    edited June 3 muthuk_vanalingamright_said_fredStrangeDaysfastasleep
  • Reply 9 of 23
    thompythompy Posts: 6member
    dee_dee said:
    mpantone said:
    Not surprised.

    Today driving down 101, I was surprised to see a full-size corporate commuter coach, the first one I've seen in over 14 months. When I passed it I noted that it belonged to WeDriveU, one of the big shuttle operators. Once it showed up in my rear view mirror, I could see that it was a training bus, not carrying actual passengers. And a few days earlier, I saw a smaller Bauer IT shuttle bus (they were early shuttle service providers for Google), probably also in training.

    But it's coming. I'm sure a lot of the other big companies (Google, Facebook, etc.) will be asking their employees for more in-person facetime.

    One of the freeway onramps had a sign indicating that metering would start in a few days, presumably because Caltrans expects more traffic when California opens up on June 15th.
    Facebook is allowing remote work after the pandemic. Google is allowing 20% of its workforce to work remote.  Twitter is going fully remote.  Most tech companies are and it’s going to be harder moving forward for Apple to hire software developers if you have to come into campus. 
    I think if you would like to work remotely, at least most of the time, then maybe you need to look at working for one of these companies. I am a manager for a tech company and we hear the same complaint from employees. Our value lies in the fact that we benefit from the collaboration between employees. Being remote a significant amount of the time you do not get the cross-team pollination. There's generally no reason for some teams would need to interact as a normal process of business. When you get everyone into an office, however, you run into people at the "watercooler" and share stories, make friends, and really innovate beyond just doing the "same old" every day. I think my company, and Apple, can show that this is a good approach. Companies are proven to be more profitable and innovative when working FROM the office is the standard. 
    JWSCright_said_fredStrangeDays
  • Reply 10 of 23
    IreneWIreneW Posts: 219member
    dee_dee said:
    mpantone said:
    Not surprised.

    Today driving down 101, I was surprised to see a full-size corporate commuter coach, the first one I've seen in over 14 months. When I passed it I noted that it belonged to WeDriveU, one of the big shuttle operators. Once it showed up in my rear view mirror, I could see that it was a training bus, not carrying actual passengers. And a few days earlier, I saw a smaller Bauer IT shuttle bus (they were early shuttle service providers for Google), probably also in training.

    But it's coming. I'm sure a lot of the other big companies (Google, Facebook, etc.) will be asking their employees for more in-person facetime.

    One of the freeway onramps had a sign indicating that metering would start in a few days, presumably because Caltrans expects more traffic when California opens up on June 15th.
    Facebook is allowing remote work after the pandemic. Google is allowing 20% of its workforce to work remote.  Twitter is going fully remote.  Most tech companies are and it’s going to be harder moving forward for Apple to hire software developers if you have to come into campus. 
    Spotify is also allowing full-time remote work.
  • Reply 11 of 23
    dee_dee said:
    mpantone said:
    Not surprised.

    Today driving down 101, I was surprised to see a full-size corporate commuter coach, the first one I've seen in over 14 months. When I passed it I noted that it belonged to WeDriveU, one of the big shuttle operators. Once it showed up in my rear view mirror, I could see that it was a training bus, not carrying actual passengers. And a few days earlier, I saw a smaller Bauer IT shuttle bus (they were early shuttle service providers for Google), probably also in training.

    But it's coming. I'm sure a lot of the other big companies (Google, Facebook, etc.) will be asking their employees for more in-person facetime.

    One of the freeway onramps had a sign indicating that metering would start in a few days, presumably because Caltrans expects more traffic when California opens up on June 15th.
    Facebook is allowing remote work after the pandemic. Google is allowing 20% of its workforce to work remote.  Twitter is going fully remote.  Most tech companies are and it’s going to be harder moving forward for Apple to hire software developers if you have to come into campus. 
    Those three are all software companies, Apple is not. Apple has hardware design and development as well as large retail and support organizations to account for. The comparison just isn't like for like. 
  • Reply 12 of 23
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 11,385member
    JWSC said:
    Some jobs lend themselves to a remote working environment.  But more creative occupations where you are working in a team environment really require face-to-face collaboration.  Zoom doesn’t cut it.

    The pandemic response has created new opportunities to work from home and some jobs will shift from office to home permanently.  But the pendulum has swung too far towards remote work.  Many companies have seen significant productivity drops this past year and are in the process of correcting that problem.  So while Silicon Valley continues it myopic pursuit of remote work, by virtue of the fact that the majority work on a computer, much of the rest of the country is rapidly returning to normal in-person work.  And that’s a very good thing.

    Just because you can work from home doesn’t mean you should.  Lack of visibility can be career limiting.
    What’s your citation for this claim? Sounds like BS you just made up. 

    For many tech companies, remote is fine. I’ve been doing it for over 5 years. I now work for a national software consulting company and they terminated many of their office leases for the added savings WFH provides. 

    Apple is a highly collaborative environment and IMO makes a higher quality product, rooted in the physical, so I see why they place value on in-person work. While it’s fine for my job, I can see the differences in the ways of working. Some shops are more aligned with one or the other, and that’s fine. 
    edited June 3 muthuk_vanalingamfastasleep
  • Reply 13 of 23
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 5,477member
    thompy said:
    dee_dee said:
    mpantone said:
    Not surprised.

    Today driving down 101, I was surprised to see a full-size corporate commuter coach, the first one I've seen in over 14 months. When I passed it I noted that it belonged to WeDriveU, one of the big shuttle operators. Once it showed up in my rear view mirror, I could see that it was a training bus, not carrying actual passengers. And a few days earlier, I saw a smaller Bauer IT shuttle bus (they were early shuttle service providers for Google), probably also in training.

    But it's coming. I'm sure a lot of the other big companies (Google, Facebook, etc.) will be asking their employees for more in-person facetime.

    One of the freeway onramps had a sign indicating that metering would start in a few days, presumably because Caltrans expects more traffic when California opens up on June 15th.
    Facebook is allowing remote work after the pandemic. Google is allowing 20% of its workforce to work remote.  Twitter is going fully remote.  Most tech companies are and it’s going to be harder moving forward for Apple to hire software developers if you have to come into campus. 
    I think if you would like to work remotely, at least most of the time, then maybe you need to look at working for one of these companies. I am a manager for a tech company and we hear the same complaint from employees. Our value lies in the fact that we benefit from the collaboration between employees. Being remote a significant amount of the time you do not get the cross-team pollination. There's generally no reason for some teams would need to interact as a normal process of business. When you get everyone into an office, however, you run into people at the "watercooler" and share stories, make friends, and really innovate beyond just doing the "same old" every day. I think my company, and Apple, can show that this is a good approach. Companies are proven to be more profitable and innovative when working FROM the office is the standard. 
    Okay, since you created an account to post this — we'd love to hear what (you think) your company does to "really innovate" on the level of Apple.
    edited June 3
  • Reply 14 of 23
    thompythompy Posts: 6member
    thompy said:
    dee_dee said:
    mpantone said:
    Not surprised.

    Today driving down 101, I was surprised to see a full-size corporate commuter coach, the first one I've seen in over 14 months. When I passed it I noted that it belonged to WeDriveU, one of the big shuttle operators. Once it showed up in my rear view mirror, I could see that it was a training bus, not carrying actual passengers. And a few days earlier, I saw a smaller Bauer IT shuttle bus (they were early shuttle service providers for Google), probably also in training.

    But it's coming. I'm sure a lot of the other big companies (Google, Facebook, etc.) will be asking their employees for more in-person facetime.

    One of the freeway onramps had a sign indicating that metering would start in a few days, presumably because Caltrans expects more traffic when California opens up on June 15th.
    Facebook is allowing remote work after the pandemic. Google is allowing 20% of its workforce to work remote.  Twitter is going fully remote.  Most tech companies are and it’s going to be harder moving forward for Apple to hire software developers if you have to come into campus. 
    I think if you would like to work remotely, at least most of the time, then maybe you need to look at working for one of these companies. I am a manager for a tech company and we hear the same complaint from employees. Our value lies in the fact that we benefit from the collaboration between employees. Being remote a significant amount of the time you do not get the cross-team pollination. There's generally no reason for some teams would need to interact as a normal process of business. When you get everyone into an office, however, you run into people at the "watercooler" and share stories, make friends, and really innovate beyond just doing the "same old" every day. I think my company, and Apple, can show that this is a good approach. Companies are proven to be more profitable and innovative when working FROM the office is the standard. 
    Okay, since you created an account to post this — we'd love to hear what (you think) your company does to "really innovate" on the level of Apple.
    Firstly, you should get your facts straight. I've had an account since 2018, however, I don't feel the need to comment on everything I see. Secondly, if you read what I said, I am not comparing my company's innovation to Apple, there is no comparison. I, however, full heartedly agree with Cook's stance on face-to-face interactions and the innovation that it can bring. As I said, the most important conversations are around the watercooler. 
  • Reply 15 of 23
    dee_deedee_dee Posts: 66member
    dee_dee said:
    mpantone said:
    Not surprised.

    Today driving down 101, I was surprised to see a full-size corporate commuter coach, the first one I've seen in over 14 months. When I passed it I noted that it belonged to WeDriveU, one of the big shuttle operators. Once it showed up in my rear view mirror, I could see that it was a training bus, not carrying actual passengers. And a few days earlier, I saw a smaller Bauer IT shuttle bus (they were early shuttle service providers for Google), probably also in training.

    But it's coming. I'm sure a lot of the other big companies (Google, Facebook, etc.) will be asking their employees for more in-person facetime.

    One of the freeway onramps had a sign indicating that metering would start in a few days, presumably because Caltrans expects more traffic when California opens up on June 15th.
    Facebook is allowing remote work after the pandemic. Google is allowing 20% of its workforce to work remote.  Twitter is going fully remote.  Most tech companies are and it’s going to be harder moving forward for Apple to hire software developers if you have to come into campus. 
    Those three are all software companies, Apple is not. Apple has hardware design and development as well as large retail and support organizations to account for. The comparison just isn't like for like. 
    Yes I realize that - that’s why I mentioned “software developers”, hardware and others have little choice in the matter. 
  • Reply 16 of 23
    dee_deedee_dee Posts: 66member
    thompy said:
    dee_dee said:
    mpantone said:
    Not surprised.

    Today driving down 101, I was surprised to see a full-size corporate commuter coach, the first one I've seen in over 14 months. When I passed it I noted that it belonged to WeDriveU, one of the big shuttle operators. Once it showed up in my rear view mirror, I could see that it was a training bus, not carrying actual passengers. And a few days earlier, I saw a smaller Bauer IT shuttle bus (they were early shuttle service providers for Google), probably also in training.

    But it's coming. I'm sure a lot of the other big companies (Google, Facebook, etc.) will be asking their employees for more in-person facetime.

    One of the freeway onramps had a sign indicating that metering would start in a few days, presumably because Caltrans expects more traffic when California opens up on June 15th.
    Facebook is allowing remote work after the pandemic. Google is allowing 20% of its workforce to work remote.  Twitter is going fully remote.  Most tech companies are and it’s going to be harder moving forward for Apple to hire software developers if you have to come into campus. 
    I think if you would like to work remotely, at least most of the time, then maybe you need to look at working for one of these companies. I am a manager for a tech company and we hear the same complaint from employees. Our value lies in the fact that we benefit from the collaboration between employees. Being remote a significant amount of the time you do not get the cross-team pollination. There's generally no reason for some teams would need to interact as a normal process of business. When you get everyone into an office, however, you run into people at the "watercooler" and share stories, make friends, and really innovate beyond just doing the "same old" every day. I think my company, and Apple, can show that this is a good approach. Companies are proven to be more profitable and innovative when working FROM the office is the standard. 
    I would need to see some evidence from you that in person work is superior to remote work. When your a software developer, 90% of your time is coding and I can say from my personal experience, my productivity has almost doubled during the pandemic without the constant and useless distractions provided by the office.  Are there in person benefits? Sure. But I think they are outweighed by the negatives.  It will be interesting to see how Apple does moving forward in terms of hiring top software talent with all the remote options others are offering now. 
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 17 of 23
    thompythompy Posts: 6member
    dee_dee said:
    thompy said:
    dee_dee said:
    mpantone said:
    Not surprised.

    Today driving down 101, I was surprised to see a full-size corporate commuter coach, the first one I've seen in over 14 months. When I passed it I noted that it belonged to WeDriveU, one of the big shuttle operators. Once it showed up in my rear view mirror, I could see that it was a training bus, not carrying actual passengers. And a few days earlier, I saw a smaller Bauer IT shuttle bus (they were early shuttle service providers for Google), probably also in training.

    But it's coming. I'm sure a lot of the other big companies (Google, Facebook, etc.) will be asking their employees for more in-person facetime.

    One of the freeway onramps had a sign indicating that metering would start in a few days, presumably because Caltrans expects more traffic when California opens up on June 15th.
    Facebook is allowing remote work after the pandemic. Google is allowing 20% of its workforce to work remote.  Twitter is going fully remote.  Most tech companies are and it’s going to be harder moving forward for Apple to hire software developers if you have to come into campus. 
    I think if you would like to work remotely, at least most of the time, then maybe you need to look at working for one of these companies. I am a manager for a tech company and we hear the same complaint from employees. Our value lies in the fact that we benefit from the collaboration between employees. Being remote a significant amount of the time you do not get the cross-team pollination. There's generally no reason for some teams would need to interact as a normal process of business. When you get everyone into an office, however, you run into people at the "watercooler" and share stories, make friends, and really innovate beyond just doing the "same old" every day. I think my company, and Apple, can show that this is a good approach. Companies are proven to be more profitable and innovative when working FROM the office is the standard. 
    I would need to see some evidence from you that in person work is superior to remote work. When your a software developer, 90% of your time is coding and I can say from my personal experience, my productivity has almost doubled during the pandemic without the constant and useless distractions provided by the office.  Are there in person benefits? Sure. But I think they are outweighed by the negatives.  It will be interesting to see how Apple does moving forward in terms of hiring top software talent with all the remote options others are offering now. 
    I don't disagree that productivity increases when you have no distractions, and you certainly have that working remotely. You need to keep in mind that productivity is not the same as innovation and Innovation is not necessarily shown in a final product. Often innovation goes deeper into the function of the company and how it interacts internally. You get this from face-to-face interactions outside of your bubble. 
  • Reply 17 of 23
    thompythompy Posts: 6member
    dee_dee said:
    thompy said:
    dee_dee said:
    mpantone said:
    Not surprised.

    Today driving down 101, I was surprised to see a full-size corporate commuter coach, the first one I've seen in over 14 months. When I passed it I noted that it belonged to WeDriveU, one of the big shuttle operators. Once it showed up in my rear view mirror, I could see that it was a training bus, not carrying actual passengers. And a few days earlier, I saw a smaller Bauer IT shuttle bus (they were early shuttle service providers for Google), probably also in training.

    But it's coming. I'm sure a lot of the other big companies (Google, Facebook, etc.) will be asking their employees for more in-person facetime.

    One of the freeway onramps had a sign indicating that metering would start in a few days, presumably because Caltrans expects more traffic when California opens up on June 15th.
    Facebook is allowing remote work after the pandemic. Google is allowing 20% of its workforce to work remote.  Twitter is going fully remote.  Most tech companies are and it’s going to be harder moving forward for Apple to hire software developers if you have to come into campus. 
    I think if you would like to work remotely, at least most of the time, then maybe you need to look at working for one of these companies. I am a manager for a tech company and we hear the same complaint from employees. Our value lies in the fact that we benefit from the collaboration between employees. Being remote a significant amount of the time you do not get the cross-team pollination. There's generally no reason for some teams would need to interact as a normal process of business. When you get everyone into an office, however, you run into people at the "watercooler" and share stories, make friends, and really innovate beyond just doing the "same old" every day. I think my company, and Apple, can show that this is a good approach. Companies are proven to be more profitable and innovative when working FROM the office is the standard. 
    I would need to see some evidence from you that in person work is superior to remote work. When your a software developer, 90% of your time is coding and I can say from my personal experience, my productivity has almost doubled during the pandemic without the constant and useless distractions provided by the office.  Are there in person benefits? Sure. But I think they are outweighed by the negatives.  It will be interesting to see how Apple does moving forward in terms of hiring top software talent with all the remote options others are offering now. 
    That first statement explains it all... Productivity is not innovation.
  • Reply 17 of 23
    thompythompy Posts: 6member
    dee_dee said:
    thompy said:
    dee_dee said:
    mpantone said:
    Not surprised.

    Today driving down 101, I was surprised to see a full-size corporate commuter coach, the first one I've seen in over 14 months. When I passed it I noted that it belonged to WeDriveU, one of the big shuttle operators. Once it showed up in my rear view mirror, I could see that it was a training bus, not carrying actual passengers. And a few days earlier, I saw a smaller Bauer IT shuttle bus (they were early shuttle service providers for Google), probably also in training.

    But it's coming. I'm sure a lot of the other big companies (Google, Facebook, etc.) will be asking their employees for more in-person facetime.

    One of the freeway onramps had a sign indicating that metering would start in a few days, presumably because Caltrans expects more traffic when California opens up on June 15th.
    Facebook is allowing remote work after the pandemic. Google is allowing 20% of its workforce to work remote.  Twitter is going fully remote.  Most tech companies are and it’s going to be harder moving forward for Apple to hire software developers if you have to come into campus. 
    I think if you would like to work remotely, at least most of the time, then maybe you need to look at working for one of these companies. I am a manager for a tech company and we hear the same complaint from employees. Our value lies in the fact that we benefit from the collaboration between employees. Being remote a significant amount of the time you do not get the cross-team pollination. There's generally no reason for some teams would need to interact as a normal process of business. When you get everyone into an office, however, you run into people at the "watercooler" and share stories, make friends, and really innovate beyond just doing the "same old" every day. I think my company, and Apple, can show that this is a good approach. Companies are proven to be more profitable and innovative when working FROM the office is the standard. 
    I would need to see some evidence from you that in person work is superior to remote work. When your a software developer, 90% of your time is coding and I can say from my personal experience, my productivity has almost doubled during the pandemic without the constant and useless distractions provided by the office.  Are there in person benefits? Sure. But I think they are outweighed by the negatives.  It will be interesting to see how Apple does moving forward in terms of hiring top software talent with all the remote options others are offering now. 
    Quality and productivity are not the same thing as innovation. Innovation is not necessarily something tangible in the final product, it can something very simple that makes developer's lives better. 
  • Reply 20 of 23
    dee_dee said:
    dee_dee said:
    mpantone said:
    Not surprised.

    Today driving down 101, I was surprised to see a full-size corporate commuter coach, the first one I've seen in over 14 months. When I passed it I noted that it belonged to WeDriveU, one of the big shuttle operators. Once it showed up in my rear view mirror, I could see that it was a training bus, not carrying actual passengers. And a few days earlier, I saw a smaller Bauer IT shuttle bus (they were early shuttle service providers for Google), probably also in training.

    But it's coming. I'm sure a lot of the other big companies (Google, Facebook, etc.) will be asking their employees for more in-person facetime.

    One of the freeway onramps had a sign indicating that metering would start in a few days, presumably because Caltrans expects more traffic when California opens up on June 15th.
    Facebook is allowing remote work after the pandemic. Google is allowing 20% of its workforce to work remote.  Twitter is going fully remote.  Most tech companies are and it’s going to be harder moving forward for Apple to hire software developers if you have to come into campus. 
    Those three are all software companies, Apple is not. Apple has hardware design and development as well as large retail and support organizations to account for. The comparison just isn't like for like. 
    Yes I realize that - that’s why I mentioned “software developers”, hardware and others have little choice in the matter. 
    🤦‍♂️
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