Bitcoin scammers steal $69k using iPhone 13 event as a lure

Posted:
in General Discussion
Scammers utilized a fake event stream, a faked Apple website, and the promise of free Bitcoin to scam unsuspecting fans during the iPhone 13 reveal event.

This obvious scam earned $69k in Bitcoin. Image source: Zscaler
This obvious scam earned $69k in Bitcoin. Image source: Zscaler


People looking for the Apple Event on September 14 may have stumbled into a lookalike stream, showing old interviews with Apple CEO Tim Cook instead of the "California Streaming" stream. Those who stuck around saw messages pop up in the video telling them to visit a special website: www.2021.apple.org.

As reported by Zscaler, the website looked like a fake version of Apple's website, advertising a Bitcoin giveaway. All the person had to do was send 0.1 to 20 Bitcoin through a QR code to have double that amount sent back.

This was a scam, but there was just enough care taken to convince people it was legitimate. Over $69k was sent to that Bitcoin wallet showing the scheme was highly successful.

Those with some technological background might spot the several flaws with the website, from the grammar problems to the .org URL. However, most people with just a passing understanding of technology could have easily mistaken such a website for a legitimate promotion.

The scammer's website is currently down and will likely remain down after successfully swindling folks out of $69,000 in Bitcoin.

Scams like this have occurred on YouTube before, with random channels being hacked to display Bitcoin promotions. Steve Wozniak is suing YouTube over that event, since his likeness was used to promote the Bitcoin fraud.

Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 16
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 5,825member
    I'm sorry, but if people are smart enough to obtain bitcoin AND get scammed out of it, I have little to no sympathy.  This website has "scam" written all over it.

    So frustrating.
    mark fearingkurai_kageStrangeDaysviclauyycrepressthisfahlmanwatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 16
    You'd think - "Send us money, and we will send you more back" may be a hint of bullsh**. Free lunch analogy? 
    kurai_kageurashidStrangeDaysrepressthisfahlmanwatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 16
    Like the above commenters, I can't even begin to be sympathetic.  In what world does someone trade less money for more.  (Maybe money laundering???)  Who would ever believe Apple might be involved?  This isn't even remotely close to something Elon would promote.  Ignorant people should NOT be taken advantage of, and that is just what these scams do.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 16
    So like 1.5 btc?  Not very good scammers
    viclauyycfahlmanwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 16
    "This was a scam, but there was just enough care taken to convince people it was legitimate."

    HOW!!!!!? If a site says, gimme money and I'll give you back more money, there's a zero percent chance of legitimacy involved there.
    beowulfschmidtwatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 16
    And that font!  :D
    edited September 21 watto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 16
    Scammers utilized a fake event stream, a faked Apple website, and the promise of free Bitcoin to scam unsuspecting fans during the iPhone 13 reveal event.


    This obvious scam earned $69k in Bitcoin. Image source: Zscaler


    People looking for the Apple Event on September 14 may have stumbled into a lookalike stream, showing old interviews with Apple CEO Tim Cook instead of the "California Streaming" stream. Those who stuck around saw messages pop up in the video telling them to visit a special website: www.2021.apple.org.

    As reported by Zscaler, the website looked like a fake version of Apple's website, advertising a Bitcoin giveaway. All the person had to do was send 0.1 to 20 Bitcoin through a QR code to have double that amount sent back.

    This was a scam, but there was just enough care taken to convince people it was legitimate. Over $69k was sent to that Bitcoin wallet showing the scheme was highly successful.

    Those with some technological background might spot the several flaws with the website, from the grammar problems to the .org URL. However, most people with just a passing understanding of technology could have easily mistaken such a website for a legitimate promotion.

    The scammer's website is currently down and will likely remain down after successfully swindling folks out of $69,000 in Bitcoin.

    Scams like this have occurred on YouTube before, with random channels being hacked to display Bitcoin promotions. Steve Wozniak is suing YouTube over that event, since his likeness was used to promote the Bitcoin fraud.

    Read on AppleInsider
    This is not www(dot)2021(dot)apple(dot)org. apple(dot)org is a valid domain, apparently not related to Apple. 

    The picture already shows the fake domain as "2021apple", without the dot in between.
    edited September 21 FileMakerFellerwatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 16
    DAalsethDAalseth Posts: 1,818member
    Wow a scam involving Bitcoin. Who would have thought. I’m shocked, SHOCKED I tell you
    /S
    tokyojimuFileMakerFellerwatto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 16
    "This was a scam, but there was just enough care taken to convince people it was legitimate."

    HOW!!!!!? If a site says, gimme money and I'll give you back more money, there's a zero percent chance of legitimacy involved there.
    You might think it’s 0%, but it worked. 
    bloggerblogwatto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 16
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 5,825member
    mr lizard said:
    "This was a scam, but there was just enough care taken to convince people it was legitimate."

    HOW!!!!!? If a site says, gimme money and I'll give you back more money, there's a zero percent chance of legitimacy involved there.
    You might think it’s 0%, but it worked. 
    Exactly.  I think a majority of garbage apps/software/products are out there because they bank on that percentage of people that just don't know how to use their brains.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 16
    How does apple.org not belong to Apple? I would assume Apple buys all of Apple dot domains to avoid scammers and wannabes. 
  • Reply 12 of 16
    How does apple.org not belong to Apple? I would assume Apple buys all of Apple dot domains to avoid scammers and wannabes. 
    As pointed out by Macplusplus, the domain is 2021apple.org

    There is minimal regulation of domain names (and most regulation is country-specific), so uniqueness is all that counts. The possibilities are endless, so there's no way even Apple with all its resources could block this particular approach.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 16
    How does apple.org not belong to Apple? I would assume Apple buys all of Apple dot domains to avoid scammers and wannabes. 
    As pointed out by Macplusplus, the domain is 2021apple.org

    There is minimal regulation of domain names (and most regulation is country-specific), so uniqueness is all that counts. The possibilities are endless, so there's no way even Apple with all its resources could block this particular approach.
    The domain is 2021.Apple.org  I haven’t been working with domains for years now, but doesn’t that mean the the domain falls under Apple.org and the 2021 is just a branch?
  • Reply 14 of 16
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,640member
    Forrest Gump: “My mamma says stupid is as stupid does.”

    Jim White (local St. Louis radio personality): “You can’t fix stupid.”

    Google sycophants on AppleInsider: “iPhone users are stupid."




    watto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 16
    mr lizard said:
    "This was a scam, but there was just enough care taken to convince people it was legitimate."

    HOW!!!!!? If a site says, gimme money and I'll give you back more money, there's a zero percent chance of legitimacy involved there.
    You might think it’s 0%, but it worked. 
    The OP said there was a zero percent chance of legitimacy, not a zero percent chance of people falling for it.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 16
    mr lizard said:
    "This was a scam, but there was just enough care taken to convince people it was legitimate."

    HOW!!!!!? If a site says, gimme money and I'll give you back more money, there's a zero percent chance of legitimacy involved there.
    You might think it’s 0%, but it worked. 
    The OP said there was a zero percent chance of legitimacy, not a zero percent chance of people falling for it.
    To fall for it, people need to think it’s legitimate. 

    No one says “this is definitely without doubt a scam. I’m in.” 
    watto_cobra
Sign In or Register to comment.