Apple cancels Joseph Gordon-Levitt's 'Mr. Corman' after one season

Posted:
in iPod + iTunes + AppleTV edited October 2021
Apple TV+ dropped the axe on Joseph Gordon-Levitt comedy-drama series "Mr. Corman" after a single season, making it the second show to be cancelled in the service's history.

Mr. Corman


Apple has opted out of renewing "Mr. Corman" for a sophomore season despite relatively positive reviews, reports Deadline. Along with starring, Gordon-Levitt created, wrote, directed and executive produced the show.

The half-hour series failed to bring in the same streaming numbers as other scripted shows, according to the report. Apple TV+ features a strong lineup of original TV shows including "Ted Lasso," "Mystic Quest," "Schmigadoon!" and "Physical," all of which have been renewed or are "looking good" for renewal, according to Deadline.

Described by Apple as "darkly funny, oddly beautiful, and deeply heartfelt," "Mr. Corman" tells the tale of a fifth-grade public school teacher in the San Fernando Valley. With a music career that didn't pan out and an ex-fiancee who moved out only to be replaced by a high school buddy, Josh struggles to cope with anxiety, loneliness and self-doubt.

The debut episode aired on Aug. 6 and the first -- and only -- season wrapped today.

Starring alongside Gordon-Levitt are Arturo Castro, Debra Winger, Bobby Hall aka Logic, Alexander Jo, Juno Temple, Jamie Chung, Shannon Woodward and Hector Hernandez.

Gordon-Levitt's other Apple TV+ project, the animated series "Wolfboy and the Everything Factory," aired on Sept. 24. All ten episodes are currently available for streaming.

News of the cancellation comes nearly two months after Apple cancelled "Little Voice," the songwriter drama produced by J.J. Abrams and Sara Bareilles.

Apple has a packed slate of upcoming original series and films including "Acapulco," "Finch," "Killers of the Flower Moon," "Swan Song," "The Tragedy of Macbeth" and "Wool." The company is reportedly doubling production efforts and expects to release one new show or movie every week in 2022.

Read on AppleInsider
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 24
    This doesn’t surprise me much. The production quality was good. But so much of it was just slice of life awkwardness. I honestly had to kind of force myself to watch it. I wanted to like it but the pacing just was too slow. 
    GeorgeBMacravnorodomiOS_Guy80StrangeDaysdav
  • Reply 2 of 24
    I didn’t understand why the critics liked it. I thought it was one of the worst ones I’ve watched along with Physical.
    GeorgeBMacentropysLoneStar88
  • Reply 3 of 24
    JapheyJaphey Posts: 1,410member
    I agree with Davidmalcolm, I had to make myself watch it too, at times. It’s a shame because I really looked forward to this show earlier this year. I know a bunch of people will come to its defense for its accurate portrayal of anxiety, but I just found it uncomfortably depressing at a time when I’m actively seeking more uplifting stimuli. It’s saying something when the best episode of the whole season was the stand alone Arturo Castro one. 
    I love JGL, but RIP to this turd. 
    edited October 2021 GeorgeBMacmark fearingosmartormenajrStrangeDays
  • Reply 4 of 24
    Two things: “The half-hour series failed to bring in the same streaming numbers as other scripted shows,” and “The series wrapped today.”

    See, that’s part of the problem. In the old days people used to watch episodic TV over weeks, when episodes were dribbled out to us. But I’m spoiled, and now always wait till the entire series is available before I watch a second of it. And I’m not the only one. 
    edited October 2021 watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 24
    JapheyJaphey Posts: 1,410member
    Two things: “The half-hour series failed to bring in the same streaming numbers as other scripted shows,” and “The series wrapped today.”

    See, that’s part of the problem. In the old days people used to watch episodic TV over weeks, when episodes were dribbled out to us. But I’m spoiled, and now always wait till the entire series is available before I watch a second of it. And I’m not the only one. 
    How does waiting until a series is over before watching it make you spoiled? People have been doing that since TV shows were released on VHS and DVD. The biggest difference between physical media and digital streaming, aside from the quality of the product and the convenient access to it, is that the companies providing the service have immediate knowledge of a great number of metrics including how many people are consuming their product. I’m sure the people running the multi-billion dollar streaming companies have highly complex comparative algorithms that can accurately predict the number of people that will wait to watch a show all at once based on the number that watch week to week. I guarantee that these people know more than you, me, or anyone else here about all this and more. Don’t worry, these companies aren’t ignoring you or anyone else like you, its just that compared to other shows, the numbers obviously weren’t there for Mr. Corman. It’s not really a problem…it just wasn’t that good. 

    edited October 2021 anantksundaramStrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 24
    Second series are often not as good as the first, particularly for programmes with a very narrow main story. It is better to quit while you’re ahead.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 24
    takeotakeo Posts: 440member
    I watched it because it was creative and I kept wanting to see what would happen… if Josh would get it together. But he never did. The big cathartic moment of him recording drums didn’t really land. So it was basically 10 episodes of people painfully telling him how much of a mopey sad sack he was (or even just a bad person) and him doing nothing to change that or prove them wrong. What was the point? Just to make us depressed?

    The FX show “Dave” is basically exactly the same formula but it (the latest season) was SO much better and more fun (and funny) and the big moment at the end where he finally learns not to be a self absorbed jerk may actually bring you to tears.
    edited October 2021 GeorgeBMacravnorodombageljoeyStrangeDays
  • Reply 8 of 24
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    takeo said:
    I watched it because it was creative and I kept wanting to see what would happen… if Josh would get it together. But he never did. The big cathartic moment of him recording drums didn’t really land. So it was basically 10 episodes of people painfully telling him how much of a mopey sad sack he was (or even just a bad person) and him doing nothing to change that or prove them wrong. What was the point? Just to make us depressed?

    The FX show “Dave” is basically exactly the same formula but it (the latest season) was SO much better and more fun (and funny) and the big moment at the end where he finally learns not to be a self absorbed jerk may actually bring you to tears.
    Yeh, what was the point?  It wasn't funny, dramatic or uplifting.   It was just painful watching some neurotic guy stumble through life with no real direction or purpose.

    As a movie it might have worked because you would know (or hope) that something would change or come to a climax over the next 90 minutes.   But in half hour weekly segments it dragged the pain out longer than I was willing to put up with.

    And, I fear that the same is happening to the second season of "See".   I loved the first season.   But the second started out with excessive, needless, explicit violence but is developing into a moribund soap opera where everybody is screwing everybody -- either physically or virtually.  Even the heroes are increasingly looking bad -- people you would not want to deal with or be around.  On the other hand, the bad guys are starting to look more human.  It might be interesting to see where this goes -- but I'm not sure I can hold out long enough to find out.

    edited October 2021
  • Reply 9 of 24
    A show about a depressed elementary school teacher!  I'd go sign up for TV+ right now if they hadn't canceled it!

    (Yes.  That is in fact sarcasm.)
    GeorgeBMacwilliamlondonanantksundaramOferentropys
  • Reply 10 of 24
    canukstormcanukstorm Posts: 2,590member
    This doesn’t surprise me much. The production quality was good. But so much of it was just slice of life awkwardness. I honestly had to kind of force myself to watch it. I wanted to like it but the pacing just was too slow. 
    I felt the same way about the Servant
    williamlondon
  • Reply 11 of 24
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 11,421member
    darkvader said:
    A show about a depressed elementary school teacher!  I'd go sign up for TV+ right now if they hadn't canceled it!

    (Yes.  That is in fact sarcasm.)

    Woulda thought that wouldn't work?
  • Reply 12 of 24
    Truly awful and depressing show...  I didn't make it past a few episodes before I gave up.
    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 13 of 24
    J G-L is an amazing actor, has anyone seen Mysterious Skin?

    Watched the first episode of Mr Corman expecting to LOVE this, but then read the credits where he's listed as writer, producer and director and it all made sense as to why it was so dull and boring.

    Just because someone is a great actor does NOT mean they can direct and produce and write, and projects like these become nothing more than great big vanity exercises for famous people believing their greatness has no bounds.

    Wish it had been so much more, really wanted it to be someone amazing.
    osmartormenajr
  • Reply 14 of 24
    I loved it and am hugely disappointed Apple cancelled it. I think it was their most literary piece so far. The first couple of episodes were fine but felt not hugely different from other shows. But as it evolved I thought it was wonderfully thoughtful: I thought it examined the difficulties being a man today, without the usual what-aboutery or comparison with women - it focused entirely on the problem at hand; I also thought it gently explored the disillusionment and lack of opportunities for a generation who probably won’t have it as good as their parents, with insecure employment and lack of human contact - particularly in the life of his housemate. But it wasn’t without hope or a sense of redemption. I thought the relationship with the mother particularly well done and her exasperation at his negativity, seemingly born of his anxiety, was at the same time loving. As part of the generation born since the 80s I recognise this anxiety and negativity and am unsure whether it’s a recent development or one only more pronounced than previously. However, I thought the show touched on this and many other things lightly but humanely. And also, chiefly, addressing that universal disappointment as we mature of life not being as cracked up to be as we fall short of our hopes and dreams. It felt a real passion piece. I finished the first season last night, deeply moved, and looking forward to more. Am truly sad Apple has cancelled it. 
    edited October 2021 williamlondonOferStrangeDays
  • Reply 15 of 24
    Just my two cents: maybe don’t write, direct, produce, and protagonize something! I’m sure it isn’t lack of talent, but I can’t escape the thought that’s a bit arrogant that you could spread yourself so thin and hope for the best!

    I’ve learned as a child that stories have beginning, middle, and an end. If that still holds, Mr. Corman told no story at all!

    The only episode I’ve enjoyed was that with Hugo Weaving.
    edited October 2021 williamlondon
  • Reply 16 of 24
    I just finished episode 10 tonight.  And was surprised it was the season (now series) finale.

    Like other posters here, I watched it dutifully and wanted to like it or at least appreciate it, but I couldn't.  My wife and I were literally "ok we've caught up on everything else, now it's time to watch that weird so again."

    Sorry, JGL this was over my head.

    Does anyone know what those recurring shimmery visions of a homeless dude were supposed to represent?
    williamlondon
  • Reply 17 of 24
    The acting was good. The problem is that nobody wants to see just how broken some people are. It’s not funny. I did come away with gratitude that I don’t have those problems and now talk to friends who may exhibit those types of behaviors to try to help them mentally. 

    The episode with Hugo Weaving as his father was very good.

    williamlondon
  • Reply 18 of 24
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,206member
    I didn’t understand why the critics liked it. I thought it was one of the worst ones I’ve watched along with Physical.
    Physical is great. Corman is unfortunately too dull, with a few nice moments.
    williamlondon
  • Reply 19 of 24
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,206member
    takeo said:
    I watched it because it was creative and I kept wanting to see what would happen… if Josh would get it together. But he never did. The big cathartic moment of him recording drums didn’t really land. So it was basically 10 episodes of people painfully telling him how much of a mopey sad sack he was (or even just a bad person) and him doing nothing to change that or prove them wrong. What was the point? Just to make us depressed?

    The FX show “Dave” is basically exactly the same formula but it (the latest season) was SO much better and more fun (and funny) and the big moment at the end where he finally learns not to be a self absorbed jerk may actually bring you to tears.
    And, I fear that the same is happening to the second season of "See".   I loved the first season.   But the second started out with excessive, needless, explicit violence but is developing into a moribund soap opera where everybody is screwing everybody -- either physically or virtually.  Even the heroes are increasingly looking bad -- people you would not want to deal with or be around.  On the other hand, the bad guys are starting to look more human.  It might be interesting to see where this goes -- but I'm not sure I can hold out long enough to find out.

    Feature, not a bug.  
    williamlondon
  • Reply 20 of 24
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,206member
    Just my two cents: maybe don’t write, direct, produce, and protagonize something! I’m sure it isn’t lack of talent, but I can’t escape the thought that’s a bit arrogant that you could spread yourself so thin and hope for the best!

    I’ve learned as a child that stories have beginning, middle, and an end. If that still holds, Mr. Corman told no story at all!

    The only episode I’ve enjoyed was that with Hugo Weaving.
    Writer-director is nothing new, and countless great amd award-winning works have been produced this way. Every film is still a collaboration, with many departments and skilled teams contributing.
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