Lawsuit targets Apple's iOS App Store 'monopoly'

2»

Comments

  • Reply 21 of 31
    Here the thing, Class Action lawsuits never benefit the public plaintiffs. Since the preponderance of award funds are taken by the lawyers who file it. This is complete BS.

    As the judge in the Epic v Apple case said, “Making a profit is not a crime.”

    You use their services, you should pay. We can have any phone we want, I choose iPhone because it’s closed. My choice.
    williamlondonBeatsAppleUfmyIMacsWithPenguinsDogperson
  • Reply 22 of 31
    mike1mike1 Posts: 2,840member
    j2fusion said:
    Gee, I really want a Mopar Hemi Hellcat engine in my Camaro, Let’s have a class action lawsuit against GM for not allowing me to order one that way. 
    Pretty good analogy.  
    MacsWithPenguins
  • Reply 23 of 31
    I have a feeling this lawsuit is started by a law firm, not someone with too much too and too less brain cells. 
  • Reply 24 of 31
    bulk001 said:
    Naiyas said:
    The proposed class is vast and includes anyone who purchased an iOS app or app license from Apple, or who made an in-app purchase, from Dec. 29, 2007, through the present.
    One pretty fundamental flaw in their argument is they don’t even know when the iOS App Store started. If they can’t get that date right then how many other holes are there in their arguments.
    More concerning is your reading comprehension. The date is for the start of who can be included in the class action suit, not when the App Store started. If you made an in app purchase from Dec 29, 2007 you will be part of the class included in the suit if it is accepted and certified as a class action suit.
    Comprehension is fine thanks as a literal read of the articles wording I quoted could just as easily imply what I stated as well was what you stated. It is not what one would consider “legal wording”… at least not in English Law anyway.
    Dogperson
  • Reply 25 of 31
    Beats said:
    Hey that’s true! Why no Windows allow Android to run on my crappy Windows laptop?!

    Greedy Microsoft wants me to buy two!!!!

    Also why can’t I run WatchOS on my Apple TV!!!!!
    I know you are ironic, but objectively speaking, Windows 11-compatible crappy laptops can run Android apps from Amazon App Store and it’s also possible to sideload Google Play Store apps. Android itself is possible to install as well, inside a VM using Android x86, installing BlueStack or similar solutions.

    That said, I object 100 % to this very silly, embarrassing lawsuit that hopefully will go nowhere.
  • Reply 26 of 31
    danoxdanox Posts: 718member
    Apple's motive for its anticompetitive conduct was simple: Apple did not want its iOS Device-related revenue stream to end when a consumer bought an iOS Device, like it generally does when consumers purchase iMac and MacBook computers," the complaint reads. "So Apple concocted and maintained a plan to continue generating additional revenues over the entire useful life of every iOS Device it sold by cornering the distribution market for iOS applications and charging consumers an extra 30% for every app.
    I wonder if these people remember that before the iPhone, Apple charged $129 for Mac OS X upgrades, the Developer Program had multiple tiers that started at $500/year (there was a free option, but  it didn't include access to the OS betas), and there certainly weren't a whole lot of great apps for less than $20-30.

    Now, the developer program is only $99, all software upgrades are free, and apps are considerably less expensive, not more.

    They want Apple to spend billions developing and maintaining the ecosystem without which they wouldn't even have a business, and not recoup any of it.

    Time to go back to paying the true cost, giving something away for free devalues it. When Apple cut the cost of Pages, Keynote, and Numbers to zero they didn’t gain anything other than shooting themselves and killing many small to mid-sized developers. In the short term Apple gained a little but in the long you lose….

    Apple reorganized the PowerBook Pro hardware, they need to reorganize the Appstore to get rid of the freeloader developer mentally the true cost needs to be up front like hardware they sell. 
    edited November 2021 williamlondon
  • Reply 27 of 31
    Another wrong headed anti-monopoly lawsuit. That 30% developer fee is not the main problem. It is actually quite reasonable especially now it is only 15% for small developers (which is the vast majority of us). The real issue is the lack of choice you as consumers have in iOS and the fact that you don't even know what you are missing since the majority of new app ideas are killed in the cradle because "Apple would never approve that." The problem has become so bad that it is actually wrecking the software development industry. The worst example is the Apple Watch which has such a limited, highly restrictive SDK that developers are limited to a very small number of use cases as dreamed up by Apple. What was the last game you played on your Apple watch? Why is that?
    Playing games on my Apple Watch?
    Isn't it waste of time and knowledge for a developer, who is trying to create a game for an Apple Watch? 
    And how am I suppose to play?...... With one hand?.....No thanks!.....
    I have therefore my iPhone, iPad and MBP
    williamlondon
  • Reply 28 of 31
    Another wrong headed anti-monopoly lawsuit. That 30% developer fee is not the main problem. It is actually quite reasonable especially now it is only 15% for small developers (which is the vast majority of us). The real issue is the lack of choice you as consumers have in iOS and the fact that you don't even know what you are missing since the majority of new app ideas are killed in the cradle because "Apple would never approve that." The problem has become so bad that it is actually wrecking the software development industry. The worst example is the Apple Watch which has such a limited, highly restrictive SDK that developers are limited to a very small number of use cases as dreamed up by Apple. What was the last game you played on your Apple watch? Why is that?
    Ouch! So we've fallin so low that now we're at the "when was the last time you played a game on the Apple Watch?" LOL 

    Here's a hint, don't develop for the Apple Watch. Simple. Apple is not forcing you or anyone else to waste a minute on the watch. BTW, the Apple Watch is doing just fine without games and fart apps. 

    "The problem has become so bad that it is actually wrecking the software development industry" aka hyperbole 


    williamlondonqwerty52
  • Reply 29 of 31
    crowleycrowley Posts: 9,320member
    Beats said:
    icoco3 said:
    rcfa said:
    It’s really funny how many fan boys rather bleed themselves financially dry rather than admit, that their favorite geek-fashion icon is abusing it’s market power.

    Best example: you can’t even install MacOS on an M1 iPad Pro with Magic Keyboard, even though it’s superior to a MacBook Air in every aspect that counts, because Apple rather sells you two devices, where one would be more than sufficient (given that MacOS can run iOS apps with catalyst, or given that the hardware can run both iOS and MacOS under a hypervisor and suspend MacOS the moment the iPad is undocked from the Magic Keyboard)

    similarly, while its perfectly OK for Apple to warn against side loading or refuse technical support if side loaded apps and system components are installed, it’s not OK for Apple to decide what I can or cannot run on hardware I bought and own.
    specifically, Apple can’t do both, decide what content they find objectionable since they don’t want to have it associated with an Apple-branded AppStore, and prevent side loading, because the combination of these two results in a private company censoring my and others free speech within the realm of privately owned property.  …”

    I hear Windows and Android calling…
    Hey that’s true! Why no Windows allow Android to run on my crappy Windows laptop?!

    Greedy Microsoft wants me to buy two!!!!

    Also why can’t I run WatchOS on my Apple TV!!!!!
    You can run Android apps on Windows 11.  

    Be careful with smug sarcasm, it can make you look like a real lemon when you get it wrong.
  • Reply 30 of 31
    No point in getting mad at anyone… except the lawyers, There is probably not a single “real” person upset at apple over this. You have a bunch of dirtbag ambulance chasing lawyers who see an opportunity.  Maybe they will get a judge who thinks “pinch to zoom” on an iPad is AI image processing…
  • Reply 31 of 31
    davidwdavidw Posts: 1,408member
    crowley said:
    Beats said:
    icoco3 said:
    rcfa said:
    It’s really funny how many fan boys rather bleed themselves financially dry rather than admit, that their favorite geek-fashion icon is abusing it’s market power.

    Best example: you can’t even install MacOS on an M1 iPad Pro with Magic Keyboard, even though it’s superior to a MacBook Air in every aspect that counts, because Apple rather sells you two devices, where one would be more than sufficient (given that MacOS can run iOS apps with catalyst, or given that the hardware can run both iOS and MacOS under a hypervisor and suspend MacOS the moment the iPad is undocked from the Magic Keyboard)

    similarly, while its perfectly OK for Apple to warn against side loading or refuse technical support if side loaded apps and system components are installed, it’s not OK for Apple to decide what I can or cannot run on hardware I bought and own.
    specifically, Apple can’t do both, decide what content they find objectionable since they don’t want to have it associated with an Apple-branded AppStore, and prevent side loading, because the combination of these two results in a private company censoring my and others free speech within the realm of privately owned property.  …”

    I hear Windows and Android calling…
    Hey that’s true! Why no Windows allow Android to run on my crappy Windows laptop?!

    Greedy Microsoft wants me to buy two!!!!

    Also why can’t I run WatchOS on my Apple TV!!!!!
    You can run Android apps on Windows 11.  

    Be careful with smug sarcasm, it can make you look like a real lemon when you get it wrong.
    That's technically a YES, but for most Android users, it's probably more like a NO. PC'ers might be better off running an emulator like BlueStacks.

    https://www.pcgamer.com/android-pc-emulators/

    With Windows 11, you can only run Android Apps from the Amazon Appstore. And only some of them. It seems that Google Play Store (for now anyway) is not available in Microsoft Windows 11 Android. That's a shit-load of Android apps that Windows 11 users won't be able to run. But the Google Play Store can be side loaded, with some effort. A lot more effort than it takes to jailbreak an iDevice or to side load in an Android device or to install an emulator.  

    https://www.mobileappdaily.com/google-play-store-vs-amazon-app-store

    https://www.windowscentral.com/how-run-google-play-store-android-apps-windows-11

    https://9to5google.com/2021/10/28/windows-11-google-play-store-video/

    This means that Android developers that want to develop for Windows 11 users, has to develop for the Amazon Appstore and not the Google Play Store or just the Google Play Store. (Either that or make their app available over the internet for side loading.) Android apps that are only available in the Google Play Store will not be available to Windows 11 users, unless they go through the (not so easy for now) process of side loading the Google Play Store. And even then, there's the question as to whether all the Android apps that depends on Google Services, will work in a Windows 11 Android environment. And I wouldn't count on Google for any tech support here, if they don't. 

    And don't think that Microsoft is being nice and doing this for the benefit of their Windows customers or developers. Or to show that they are not anti-completive. They are doing this because they are facing some serious competition from Google ChromeOS. Which is now the second leading desktop computer OS and Microsoft is the one losing marketshare to Google. Specially in the low end PC market. And guess what ChromeOS can do natively? ....... run Android apps from the Google Play Store. This explains why the Google Play Store is not in Microsoft Windows 11 Android subsystem. Google might not want to igive away what might be a major advantage they have with ChromeOS. (And I'm sure there are some that think Google is being "anti-competitive" because  they think Google is abusing the "monopoly" they have with their Google Play Store.)

    https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2021/02/the-worlds-second-most-popular-desktop-operating-system-isnt-macos-anymore/


    edited November 2021 qwerty52
Sign In or Register to comment.