Claris FileMaker Pro updated with Shortcuts support, more

Posted:
in Mac Software edited November 2021
Apple susbsidiary Claris this week issued an update for its flagship FileMaker Pro software with a slew of new features and enhancements, including Shortcuts for macOS Monterey.

FileMaker Pro


In macOS Monterey, FileMaker Pro 19.4.1 brings Shortcuts support to the Mac version of Claris' low-code software development tool for the first time. Using the Script Workspace, users can designate which FileMaker scripts within a FileMaker Pro file to hand over to Shortcuts, then use Siri or the Shortcuts app to open the file, run a script or pass in an optional parameter.

Shortcuts has been available to FileMaker Go since version 19 launched on iOS in 2020.

The latest version of FileMaker Pro supports more OAuth identity providers, while a new Custom OAuth account type allows the software to authenticate users through a customized identity provider. Additionally, a new session identifier allows custom app developers to provide administrators with more user information.

Features enhanced in version 19.4.1 include faster SQL queries for field information in FileMaker Pro files and improvements to the "Request" option in the Execute FileMaker Data API script step.

A number of issues are addressed in the release, with Claris noting FileMaker Pro is now updated to OpenSSL version 1.1.1l. A full list of bug fixes for Windows and Mac is included in accompanying release notes.

To go along with FileMaker Pro version 19.4.1, Claris on Tuesday also issued FileMaker Server 19.4.1 and FileMaker Go 19.4.1.

Claris transitioned from annual releases to a rolling schedule in 2020 and has since issued a number of substantial updates for its FileMaker Pro product, the most recent of which delivered support for Apple Silicon Macs in June.

FileMaker Pro can be purchased from Claris' website with prices starting at $19 per user, per month.

Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 11
    People STILL use FileMaker?!  :D
    williamlondon
  • Reply 2 of 11
    dee_dee said:
    People STILL use FileMaker?!  :D

    Good point. Filemaker is a powerful database management system and quite versatile, but on the other hand, it was always supposed to be the easy-to-use option, and that crown has been taken away by Airtable most notably. Filemaker appears to have stood still since the mid 2000s. I don't bother with it anymore. If I want to build a quick base I use Airtable, which is free. Filemaker is 20 bucks a month!
    williamlondon
  • Reply 3 of 11
    I wish Apple would give Claris to re-invent CalrisWorks - perhaps the greatest piece of software ever sold. iWork has never compared in its utility, intuitiveness, power and consistency across apps, let alone make up for the missing database, draw and paint modules. 
    jesusfreak
  • Reply 4 of 11
    Alex_V said:
    dee_dee said:
    People STILL use FileMaker?!  :D
    Filemaker appears to have stood still since the mid 2000s. I don't bother with it anymore.
    Complete nonsense. One of the most innovative products on the market. You obviously didn’t bother to even look at it since the mid 2000s…
    Detnatorjesusfreakseanjwilliamlondonjony0
  • Reply 5 of 11
    crowleycrowley Posts: 10,029member
    They're called Claris again?  I thought they were just called FileMaker?
  • Reply 6 of 11
    hucom2000 said:
    Alex_V said:
    dee_dee said:
    People STILL use FileMaker?!  :D
    Filemaker appears to have stood still since the mid 2000s. I don't bother with it anymore.
    Complete nonsense. One of the most innovative products on the market. You obviously didn’t bother to even look at it since the mid 2000s…

    I have a licensed copy. I use it for my legacy databases, but not when I want to build a new one. Airtable is far easier to use. FileMaker is essentially unchanged for maybe ten years, with incremental updates only. They are now emphasising the ability to make apps, if only the software was easier to use. Whenever I worked with it I had to re-learn it all from scratch. Even Photoshop is easier to master. 
    williamlondon
  • Reply 7 of 11
    I have FileMaker 16. I started on FileMaker in about 2002 (version 6?). Later I discovered a super easy to use database app called Bento, made by… FileMaker. Brilliant. It was a simple thing, not relational, but I could build a db for a project in minutes. Then FileMaker discontinues it. They probably had good reason, but I don’t get it. I still didn’t get it when I discover Airtable about a year ago.  My first thought: “They’ve built a Bento for the web!” Airtable is clever, not as powerful as FileMaker, but improving. And it’s gaining traction. Why would FileMaker cede the easy-to-use database space to a new entrant? When they had the ideal app themselves?

    PS, curiously, I mostly notice MS Excel being used as a database for text, not as a spreadsheet. That is exactly the purpose of Airtable, Bento etc. 
    williamlondon
  • Reply 8 of 11
    Filemaker is very capable and has a large customer base.  Far better than MS Access (not to mention cross platform).  If you haven't looked at it recently, it's worth consideration.
    seanjwilliamlondon
  • Reply 9 of 11
    Alex_V said:
    hucom2000 said:
    Alex_V said:
    dee_dee said:
    People STILL use FileMaker?!  :D
    Filemaker appears to have stood still since the mid 2000s. I don't bother with it anymore.
    Complete nonsense. One of the most innovative products on the market. You obviously didn’t bother to even look at it since the mid 2000s…

    I have a licensed copy. I use it for my legacy databases, but not when I want to build a new one. Airtable is far easier to use. FileMaker is essentially unchanged for maybe ten years, with incremental updates only. They are now emphasising the ability to make apps, if only the software was easier to use. Whenever I worked with it I had to re-learn it all from scratch. Even Photoshop is easier to master. 
    If you think FM hasn't changed in ten years, you haven't been paying attention.  Airtable is not comparable to the Filemaker platform.  For basic stuff it is fine, but not even close overall.
    williamlondon
  • Reply 10 of 11
    Filemaker is very capable and has a large customer base.  Far better than MS Access (not to mention cross platform).  If you haven't looked at it recently, it's worth consideration.
    You’re probably right. Still one million active users appears modest. I’m willing to stick my neck out and make a prediction: Unless FileMaker does something radically different, they’ll gradually get squeezed out of the market by the ‘no code app building’ guys, on the one side; and the ‘dumbed down database apps’, on the other side. 
    williamlondon
  • Reply 11 of 11
    crowley said:
    They're called Claris again?  I thought they were just called FileMaker?
    I had the same question. Apparently: https://www.claris.com/

    now there’s a product called “connect”.

    it is weird though. Final cut and logic are Apple branded, FileMaker is Claris branded. Why? Is it because making videos is cool but databases are not?
    jony0
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