Apple fighting Russia over alternative App Store payments

Posted:
in General Discussion edited December 2021
Apple is going to court against the Russian Federal Antimonopoly Service, over a demand by the regulator to stop Apple's App Store payment policies.




The lawsuit concerns a warning given by FAS in August, telling the iPhone maker to let app developers advise to users about alternative ways to pay, instead of using Apple's in-app purchases system. At the time, FAS gave Apple until September 30 to comply, or face a potential penalty based on its revenue in Russia.

In October, the regulator then launched an antitrust lawsuit against Apple for non-compliance. However, FAS did so only a few days after Apple altered its developer guidelines to loosen its anti-steering provisions, a move that theoretically could have brought Apple into compliance, albeit later than demanded.

Russia Today reports Apple is now seeking a judicial review of the regulator's warning.

The new legal battle is only the latest government-related incident that Apple has to contend with over its Russian operations. In July, Apple filed an appeal against an earlier 2020 ruling by FAS that said the App Store gave Apple an unfair advantage in the digital economy, resulting in a fine of $12 million.

In November, state communications regulator Roskomnadzor issued a demand that Apple and 12 other companies be officially represented on Russian soil by the end of 2021, or face restrictions or an outright ban.

Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 10
    As an Apple Shareholder, I say use this country as an example by charging every App that by passes the in app charge, a list fee that covers Store Cost, Tool Development Cost, IP & Licensing Cost and Legal Cost.

    These free loaders should not be allowed to list their App in the App Store for Free. Their customers should be charged the full 30% or 15% fee before they can download or update the app from the App Store on a yearly basis to ensure Apple gets paid upfront! 

    No such thing as a free lunch, especially on shareholders’ dimes! 
    Detnatoraderutterwatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 10
    Obviously you’re not a developer but I am one. 
    There’s nothing free. As an Apple developer we all have to pay $99.00 USD Every Year to Apple to have a developer account regardless of whether the App is free or not! I have a Free App in the AppStore from which I do not make a penny for my time and effort! So who is earning free cash me, Apple or the Shareholders like yourself? In fact you’re the one who is earning money out of us developers working hard to put cash in your bank. So know the facts before you make a comment next time. 
    edited December 2021 williamlondonmuthuk_vanalingamOfer
  • Reply 3 of 10
    SHAL1M said:
    Obviously you’re not a developer but I am one. 
    There’s nothing free. As an Apple developer we all have to pay $99.00 USD Every Year to Apple to have a developer account regardless of whether the App is free or not! I have a Free App in the AppStore from which I do not make a penny for my time and effort! So who is earning free cash me, Apple or the Shareholders like yourself? In fact you’re the one who is earning money out of us developers working hard to put cash in your bank. So know the facts before you make a comment next time. 
    I have a website for representing my free Adobe plugin. I pay $400 a year for hosting and gmail services. So your $99 would be a bargain in contrast. Besides, Microsoft also charges $99 for the privilege and tools. 
    Detnatorjas99dewmewilliamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 10
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 5,940member
    SHAL1M said:
    Obviously you’re not a developer but I am one. 
    There’s nothing free. As an Apple developer we all have to pay $99.00 USD Every Year to Apple to have a developer account regardless of whether the App is free or not! I have a Free App in the AppStore from which I do not make a penny for my time and effort! So who is earning free cash me, Apple or the Shareholders like yourself? In fact you’re the one who is earning money out of us developers working hard to put cash in your bank. So know the facts before you make a comment next time. 
    As a developer myself, that you are not making money off your app says more about you and your ability than it does about Apple.  You are not guaranteed anything from Apple outside of what you get for your $99 developer fee.  Apple makes money from your app if you make money.  It's a fair and equitable arrangement.  If you're not making money from your app, then what are YOU doing to rectify this?  If you feel it's unfair, you are more than welcome to remove your app and go to Android or other platforms.  

    These are facts that you should know (and probably do) before you lecture others.
    leavingthebiggmikeybabesmontrosemacsDetnatorbeowulfschmidtjas99dewmewilliamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 10
    Many people posting here love Apple's rules for developers and customers even though they limit what they are allowed to do with the devices they own. However, Apple has to play by Russia's rules when it sells products in that country. The same goes for China and even in the USA. Will these same defenders of arbitrary rules be consistent when the tables are turned and it is Apple that is forced to follow them? I think not.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 6 of 10
    Many people posting here love Apple's rules for developers and customers even though they limit what they are allowed to do with the devices they own. However, Apple has to play by Russia's rules when it sells products in that country. The same goes for China and even in the USA. Will these same defenders of arbitrary rules be consistent when the tables are turned and it is Apple that is forced to follow them? I think not.
    Anti-steering is not an "arbitrary" rule. It's a rule that is widely used throughout the global business world. There's nothing new or unusual about it at all. Companies that operate their own stores do not want to directly promote alternate places of purchase to customers when those customers are using their store. It's always been up to the customer to "shop around" and see if they can get a better price somewhere else. Considering that the iPhone allows customers access to the internet and social media etc., there is no barrier to "shopping around" for an iPhone user. 
    genovellewilliamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 10
    genovellegenovelle Posts: 1,354member
    Many people posting here love Apple's rules for developers and customers even though they limit what they are allowed to do with the devices they own. However, Apple has to play by Russia's rules when it sells products in that country. The same goes for China and even in the USA. Will these same defenders of arbitrary rules be consistent when the tables are turned and it is Apple that is forced to follow them? I think not.
    Anti-steering is not an "arbitrary" rule. It's a rule that is widely used throughout the global business world. There's nothing new or unusual about it at all. Companies that operate their own stores do not want to directly promote alternate places of purchase to customers when those customers are using their store. It's always been up to the customer to "shop around" and see if they can get a better price somewhere else. Considering that the iPhone allows customers access to the internet and social media etc., there is no barrier to "shopping around" for an iPhone user. 
    Also, keep in mind just because a customer has access to the App Store does not guarantee the will buy apps. Apple markets their store effectively which is why app developers make more from App than Android with the same apps. 
    williamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 10
    glennh said:
    As an Apple Shareholder, I say use this country as an example by charging every App that by passes the in app charge, a list fee that covers Store Cost, Tool Development Cost, IP & Licensing Cost and Legal Cost.

    These free loaders should not be allowed to list their App in the App Store for Free. Their customers should be charged the full 30% or 15% fee before they can download or update the app from the App Store on a yearly basis to ensure Apple gets paid upfront! 

    No such thing as a free lunch, especially on shareholders’ dimes! 
    Then Apple should be forced to allow a means other than the App Store for installation of software.

    Companies don't always want to have their lunch for free, but the 30% that Apple charges for payment processing is quite ridiculous.

    I say drop it to a flat 15% across the board or allow "sideloading"

    Apple can't have their cake and eat it too, no matter how much they whine and complain.
    edited December 2021 williamlondonmuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 9 of 10
    Many people posting here love Apple's rules for developers and customers even though they limit what they are allowed to do with the devices they own. However, Apple has to play by Russia's rules when it sells products in that country. The same goes for China and even in the USA. Will these same defenders of arbitrary rules be consistent when the tables are turned and it is Apple that is forced to follow them? I think not.
    Anti-steering is not an "arbitrary" rule. It's a rule that is widely used throughout the global business world. There's nothing new or unusual about it at all. Companies that operate their own stores do not want to directly promote alternate places of purchase to customers when those customers are using their store. It's always been up to the customer to "shop around" and see if they can get a better price somewhere else. Considering that the iPhone allows customers access to the internet and social media etc., there is no barrier to "shopping around" for an iPhone user. 
    You can't "shop around" for iOS apps, the only place you can currently obtain them is through the App Store.

    That's the most important fact in all these antitrust complaints, you can't go anywhere else, so you have to pay Apple's 15-30% 
    williamlondon
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