Continued iOS 14 security updates were meant to be temporary, Apple says

Posted:
in iOS edited January 19
That the option to stay on iOS 14 and receive security updates instead of upgrading to iOS 15 was always meant to be a temporary measure, Apple has confirmed.

iOS 15 on iPhone 13 Pro devices
iOS 15 on iPhone 13 Pro devices


When it launched iOS 15, Apple gave users the choice of remaining on iOS 14 and getting important security updates. It even listed that option as a feature on its iOS 15 preview page.

However, on Wednesday, Ars Technica said that Apple has confirmed that the iOS 14 security update option was meant to be temporary. The option was reportedly a "grace period" while Apple worked out initial iOS 15 bugs.

The publication -- and AppleInsider reached out to Apple after reports indicated that iOS 14.8.1 -- the last update to iOS 14 -- was no longer being offered to devices. Instead, users were being prompted to upgrade to iOS 15.

Apple's iOS 14.8.1 update was released in October 2021. There has not been a security fix update to iOS 14 since.

As of 1:59 PM ET on January 19, Apple's iOS 15 page still lists the ability to remain on iOS 14 as a feature. And, the iOS 14.8.1 update is still being digitally signed by Apple.

"iOS may now offer a choice between two software update versions in the Settings app. You can update to the latest version of iOS 15 as soon as it's released for the latest features and most complete set of security updates," the site reads. "Or continue on iOS 14 and still get important security updates."

It isn't readily clear by the feature description that the measure was meant to be temporary. However, with no current release of iOS 14 available to consumers, it appears that users have little choice but to upgrade to iOS 15.

It's not clear who the publication spoke to as it pertains to the iOS 14 availability.

AppleInsider reached out to Apple corporate for confirmation about the matter. The company referred to a support document from September 2021 indicating that iOS 14 updates would be available for a "period of time." An archived version of the page indicates that the "period of time" statement has been there since September.

Following the response, AppleInsider has asked for clarification about whether the "period of time" has officially elapsed.

Earlier in January, official device operating system statistics released by Apple indicated that adoption of iOS 15 was lagging behind its predecessors. As of Jan. 11, 2022, only 72% of devices released in the previous four years were running a version of iOS 15.

Update 4:20 p.m. Eastern: Updated with response from Apple.

Read on AppleInsider

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 10
    I generally upgrade iOS in late January. I found the security updates for iOS 14 in the early days after iOS 15 helpful and wish they’d continued for a little longer. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 10
    ...I wish Apple would slow everything down especially macOS which seemed to be released on merit (every 2~3 years through 2011) vs a calendar basis which may serve annual shareholder interests...

    This lack of continuity has created at this customer end a ton of overhead juggling app compatibility and for example the orphaning of 32 bit apps also came with a flurry of upgrade costs for various apps, many switching from the persistent licensing 'gold rush' to the unsustainable subscription model. Is this the opposite of Windows with long support cycles and recognition of such burdens on business? I understand 32 bit apps are still supported in Windows...?

    I just asked a developer today if Windows is now easier than the mac and in suit a better 'customer experience'...?
    edited January 19 elijahgbaconstangOctoMonkey
  • Reply 3 of 10
    jas99jas99 Posts: 95member
    ...I wish Apple would slow everything down especially macOS which seemed to be released on merit (every 2~3 years through 2011) vs a calendar basis which may serve annual shareholder interests...

    This lack of continuity has created at this customer end a ton of overhead juggling app compatibility and for example the orphaning of 32 bit apps also came with a flurry of upgrade costs for various apps, many switching from the persistent licensing 'gold rush' to the unsustainable subscription model. Is this the opposite of Windows with long support cycles and recognition of such burdens on business? I understand 32 bit apps are still supported in Windows...?

    I just asked a developer today if Windows is now easier than the mac and in suit a better 'customer experience'...?
    Using Windows is literally psychological torture. 

    Go ahead and try switching back to bugville and error messages. Oh, and ransomeware. 

    One reason I retired from corporate America was I couldn’t take the junk hardware and software environments in which I was forced to conduct business - even at the executive level. 
    StrangeDayscat52watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 10
    jas99 said:
    ...I wish Apple would slow everything down especially macOS which seemed to be released on merit (every 2~3 years through 2011) vs a calendar basis which may serve annual shareholder interests...

    This lack of continuity has created at this customer end a ton of overhead juggling app compatibility and for example the orphaning of 32 bit apps also came with a flurry of upgrade costs for various apps, many switching from the persistent licensing 'gold rush' to the unsustainable subscription model. Is this the opposite of Windows with long support cycles and recognition of such burdens on business? I understand 32 bit apps are still supported in Windows...?

    I just asked a developer today if Windows is now easier than the mac and in suit a better 'customer experience'...?
    Using Windows is literally psychological torture. 

    Go ahead and try switching back to bugville and error messages. Oh, and ransomeware. 

    One reason I retired from corporate America was I couldn’t take the junk hardware and software environments in which I was forced to conduct business - even at the executive level. 
    No it isn't and surprisingly after 16 years with Mac OS X and macOS I have found that search on Windows is far more superior than on macOS (it is just as good as Spotlight 10 years ago when it was far better with narrower, focused results) and interface of Windows 11 improved hugely. I do not find anything of special merit on macOS these days and on Windows 11 it is very easy to operate.

    Bugville is rather synonymous with Apple these days. Should I re-tell story of my friend who was developer on macOS and left Apple 2-3 years ago? Managers at Apple are simply clueless. We both came with 25-30 years software development experience and  half of it in finance where quality of software is far higher than any software vendor... Apple, Google, IBM e.t.c. It is just  methods that have to be used and Apple can't  be reformed.
    edited January 19
  • Reply 5 of 10
    ...I wish Apple would slow everything down especially macOS which seemed to be released on merit (every 2~3 years through 2011) vs a calendar basis which may serve annual shareholder interests...

    This lack of continuity has created at this customer end a ton of overhead juggling app compatibility and for example the orphaning of 32 bit apps also came with a flurry of upgrade costs for various apps, many switching from the persistent licensing 'gold rush' to the unsustainable subscription model. Is this the opposite of Windows with long support cycles and recognition of such burdens on business? I understand 32 bit apps are still supported in Windows...?

    I just asked a developer today if Windows is now easier than the mac and in suit a better 'customer experience'...?
    I use Windows 10 during the day in my customer’s enterprise, where I write desktop software. IMO Windows still sucks compared to using macOS, despite being a developer on the platform for decades. Things are just kludgier. Enterprise Windows also loves to load up tons of McAfee scanners and IBM app pushers, which eat my CPU and force it to run & noisy hot all the time. No progress, IMO. 
    cat52aderutterwatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 10
    entropysentropys Posts: 3,451member
    I just upgraded my iOS devices in the last few weeks (post Christmas seems a good plan). I always wait a while for the worst bugs to be sorted.

    I must say though that I did appreciate not being constantly hassled to upgrade these last few months. 

    A lot.
    baconstangcat52watto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 10
    entropysentropys Posts: 3,451member
    Windows? I despise the daily ritual for my work computer boot up, with the daily installation manager cycle. And if I don’t reboot daily, things stop working pretty quick. That might be the IT department as much as MS, but still.
    cat52aderutterwatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 10
    entropys said:
    And if I don’t reboot daily, things stop working pretty quick.
    Just out of curiosity, what stops working?

    watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 10
    fahlmanfahlman Posts: 737member
    I support thousands of Windows computers and hundreds of macOS computers as my job. I would never use Windows personally. It's even a double-edged sword in the enterprise due to the manageability, but its a security nightmare.
    caladanianwatto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 10
    fahlman said:
    I support thousands of Windows computers and hundreds of macOS computers as my job. I would never use Windows personally. It's even a double-edged sword in the enterprise due to the manageability, but its a security nightmare.
    I have worked in environments with many thousands of Windows and Mac computers.  The Windows admins have far more BS to deal with: driver packs, KBs and hotfixes, quality rollups, cumulative rollups, etc.  Patching is a major headache on Windows, especially with how I've seen it work in SCCM.  If you want an 'easy' solution, be prepared to pay a lot of money for a third party product, or else you're using something like Ninite for a small/medium office.  On the Mac, there are so many awesome developers who have created whole patching solutions FOR FREE and posted them on Github with excellent documentation.  Nudge is an example of one designed to encourage users to install their macOS updates in a timely manner.  Even a halfway competent admin with some scripting chops can make sense of most of the offerings and roll them out quickly, and the developers are motivated by Apple's mantra of making great user experiences.
    aderutterwatto_cobra
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