Hands on with Apple Vision Pro in the wild

13»

Comments

  • Reply 41 of 51
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 6,869administrator
    ste91 said:
    Did you try any of the environments? If so, were they impressive? Were you able to walk around within them? They mentioned they’re captured volumetrically and showed some camera motions that made it appear as if you can sorta move within them. 
    This feature does not work yet. The test app I used was moving around in a space to learn how to operate the machinery, but I don't believe that's what you're talking about.
    edited August 2023 byronlwatto_cobrajellybelly
  • Reply 42 of 51
    danox said:
    I am a simple consumer, I will be purchasing one on day one. It is about half the cost of the original Macintosh (inflation adjusted) and I purchased that as well. I believe most are underestimating the demand this spatial computer will generate with the general public. Many "average Joe's" I know plan on buying one. Credit cards and payment plans are a wonderful thing.

    Touché….. when people get a chance to try it out at the store, that will be the selling point, and if the experience is overwhelmingly positive, some will cry about the price even more as it has the power of a MacBook Pro/iPad Pro with a new R1desktop class co-processing chip and 12 cameras it won’t be cheaper.

    Just go to the Apple webpage and look at the prices for a MacBook Pro/iPad Pro, add a R1desktop class co-processing chip and 12 cameras.
    I Echo this sentiment. When you look at the cost of Apple monitors, it’s not such a high price. I’m going to be rearranging my budget and expectations for new products around the thought of purchasing. The moment I saw the demonstration iPhone I could see the potential is the world changing computer vision pro has exactly the same feel.
    danoxwatto_cobrawilliamlondonjahblade
  • Reply 43 of 51
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,533member
    About the price. We read and head a lot of protests over how expensive it is. There are two ways of looking at this (no pun intended). One way is from the cheapest, looking up, and the other is looking at the most expensive, looking down. We can do this with anything. The most expensive new car is a Rolls-Royce. Estimated price? Between 20 to 30 million US dollars. That’s a lot. The cheapest is somewhere around $7,000, but only available in several developing countries. So is a $50,000 car cheap or expensive? It’s a lot closer to the cheapest car, so the first thought would be that it’s cheap. But to most people, it’s not. But an awful lot of people do buy $50,000 cars and trucks, so it’s not really expensive either.

    Apple’s headset it pretty cheap compared to many other industrial models, especially if the tethered computers are added in. And we know Apple is very interested in industry. In an interview with Jon Gruber after the introduction, he said that they were getting many calls from enterprise. That’s really not surprising as they would look at this as a high performance unit at a fairly low price. Mike’s experience with this was with someone developing an industrial software suite. I think Apple would be very happy if much of early development was with these customers. It would validate what Apple is doing.

    then, as has been pointed out by various people, a consumer version would be available at a much lower, but still not cheap price. By seeing what has been done with it in a high level, consumers will be more motivated to spend more than they would for the inferiors other consumer headsets out there. I’ve tried several consumer headsets as well. They are not good, folks. Are they acceptable? For people who really want them and are willing to put up with the deficiencies, sure.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 44 of 51
    XedXed Posts: 2,622member
    melgross said:
    About the price. We read and head a lot of protests over how expensive it is. There are two ways of looking at this (no pun intended). One way is from the cheapest, looking up, and the other is looking at the most expensive, looking down. We can do this with anything. The most expensive new car is a Rolls-Royce. Estimated price? Between 20 to 30 million US dollars. That’s a lot. The cheapest is somewhere around $7,000, but only available in several developing countries. So is a $50,000 car cheap or expensive? It’s a lot closer to the cheapest car, so the first thought would be that it’s cheap. But to most people, it’s not. But an awful lot of people do buy $50,000 cars and trucks, so it’s not really expensive either.

    Apple’s headset it pretty cheap compared to many other industrial models, especially if the tethered computers are added in. And we know Apple is very interested in industry. In an interview with Jon Gruber after the introduction, he said that they were getting many calls from enterprise. That’s really not surprising as they would look at this as a high performance unit at a fairly low price. Mike’s experience with this was with someone developing an industrial software suite. I think Apple would be very happy if much of early development was with these customers. It would validate what Apple is doing.

    then, as has been pointed out by various people, a consumer version would be available at a much lower, but still not cheap price. By seeing what has been done with it in a high level, consumers will be more motivated to spend more than they would for the inferiors other consumer headsets out there. I’ve tried several consumer headsets as well. They are not good, folks. Are they acceptable? For people who really want them and are willing to put up with the deficiencies, sure.
    A one-off build like the Boat Tail for an estimated $28 million shouldn't be part of this comparison, or you may as well as add anything that is a one-off, like any piece or art of some gaudy gold-plated CE that we see from time to time.

     And there are many hand-built autos that produce in numbers that are considerably more expensive than the RR, but none are at $30 million.

    https://carbuzz.com/cars/rolls-royce/ghost/specs-and-trims
    https://www.motor1.com/features/308149/most-expensive-new-cars-ever/
    muthuk_vanalingamwilliamlondonjellybelly
  • Reply 45 of 51
    As always the hardware is about the software.  I have long imagined this type of hardware for video and audio post production like in FCPX.  Hands reaching, grabbing, trimming etc while still seeing the clients … a couple of foot peddles even.  Could be effective.
    byronl
  • Reply 46 of 51
    If Apple uses their content creation gear ( special VP “binocular and more” cameras for soccer streaming to VP (and any later sports league rights or license deal) and off several viewpoints from each end of the pitch as well as midfield, they could hasten adoption by sports fans who have a “ sports spend” ability and passion.  With multiple cameras at each location and seat height and a higher height ( equivalent to current high suspended cameras for overview action), the viewer can select their viewpoint from two windows that enlarge upon eye aim or eye aim and finger gesture combination. 

    To me this provides not only a game-side seat experience but what is missing from game seats—the TV camera closeups, vantage points plus game commentary and better stat display than looking at game-side scoreboard. 

    The “kicker” would be a free one season subscription pass upon buying the Vision Pro. 
    This would follow the successful TV+ one year subscriptions offered with certain hardware purchases. This seems near inevitable. And that will lead to more subscriptions.  And that adoption will make Apple attractive to other sports leagues for revenue from more paying eyeballs, perhaps starting with licensing to Apple and upon proving itself leading to rights deals.  Apple certainly has the money for rights acquisition. 

    Apple would have to blend their conventional play-by- play streaming commentary along with replays and telephoto close-ups into the Vision Pro sport’s experience. This seems that it will be evolutionary with flat replays and flat close-ups in adjacent windows until they evolve their “VP” cameras in numbers and abilities for the control booth to make live cuts.  Plus evolving a way that’s not jarring to the viewer ( that may not be easy and may require learning by viewers. And how about side-by-side windows that enlarge when you look at them so you make your own cuts?

    Sports and later gaming improvements for VP could be two of the biggest drivers of the adoptions.  
    There is no shortage of sports and game addicts that have the dollars to spend for a better than game-side experience. Maybe a partnership with Disney on ESPN is already in discussion. 

    I’m not sure of a lesser capable version to offer a cheaper price.  The price could come down as Apple integrates more functions into the R chip and produces and sells higher numbers. But if their gross margin is around 40%, they won’t give that up.  How could they leave out features? The value-to-price ratio would not be there. If anything, further iterations will improve and increase features and function.

    More likely might be a Max version for certain users such as industrial or other special-use and higher needs users would appear. The Pro price could migrate down through economies-of-scale with higher mass production as I mentioned—if there is demand and the ability to produce at much higher scale.  
    My whole comment thread here is that I do believe demand will be there through use-cases developed and in demand. Supply chain issues remain in the next 8 months to a year or beyond though. 

    Another interesting possibility is with the first year production limited to say 300,000 to 400,000 and demand eats that up as fast as they are available, Apple will get earned media and that and unattainability will only drive up demand still more. 

    There are many more buyers with less price sensitivity than the supply will satisfy in the first year. That needs to be said again and again. 

    If they are only sold in-store, to assure user fit and prescription lens success, the slow process may start and continue by appointment only. When supply increases ( probably as much as a year later due to certain parts supply constraints), could we just possibly see lines around stores again? More earned media and contagious desirability. Appointments may remain the only way to preview or purchase, hence lines not happening. Cool to imagine though. 

    Does anyone see flaws in this concept of case-use for sports and gaming and a faster evolution in content and user adoption, say, over an approximate three year (+ or - ) period? 

    I’m open to discussion and input on this. 
    The problems, limitations and obstacles you present may be quite valid and could push us to be creative in seeing solutions in discussions. 

    Exciting this is. Start your ‘imagineering’ engines. 
    byronl
  • Reply 47 of 51
    macguimacgui Posts: 2,369member
    I will be competing with Melgross and others for a shot at an AVP on day one. As is another poster, I too will be a simple user, wanting only (at this time) to consume immersive video at home, and not worry TSA. As we find out more about the AVP down the road that could influenced my decision to pull the trigger.

    Apps aside, what audio and video content might be available for consumption and how will it be loaded into the AVP. AirPlay? Apple Music? The price doesn't seem at all steep to me for I've seen so far. But if it doesn't do what I'm interested in then it's a non-starter. I need to brush up on the APV.
    byronl
  • Reply 48 of 51
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,533member
    Xed said:
    melgross said:
    About the price. We read and head a lot of protests over how expensive it is. There are two ways of looking at this (no pun intended). One way is from the cheapest, looking up, and the other is looking at the most expensive, looking down. We can do this with anything. The most expensive new car is a Rolls-Royce. Estimated price? Between 20 to 30 million US dollars. That’s a lot. The cheapest is somewhere around $7,000, but only available in several developing countries. So is a $50,000 car cheap or expensive? It’s a lot closer to the cheapest car, so the first thought would be that it’s cheap. But to most people, it’s not. But an awful lot of people do buy $50,000 cars and trucks, so it’s not really expensive either.

    Apple’s headset it pretty cheap compared to many other industrial models, especially if the tethered computers are added in. And we know Apple is very interested in industry. In an interview with Jon Gruber after the introduction, he said that they were getting many calls from enterprise. That’s really not surprising as they would look at this as a high performance unit at a fairly low price. Mike’s experience with this was with someone developing an industrial software suite. I think Apple would be very happy if much of early development was with these customers. It would validate what Apple is doing.

    then, as has been pointed out by various people, a consumer version would be available at a much lower, but still not cheap price. By seeing what has been done with it in a high level, consumers will be more motivated to spend more than they would for the inferiors other consumer headsets out there. I’ve tried several consumer headsets as well. They are not good, folks. Are they acceptable? For people who really want them and are willing to put up with the deficiencies, sure.
    A one-off build like the Boat Tail for an estimated $28 million shouldn't be part of this comparison, or you may as well as add anything that is a one-off, like any piece or art of some gaudy gold-plated CE that we see from time to time.

     And there are many hand-built autos that produce in numbers that are considerably more expensive than the RR, but none are at $30 million.

    https://carbuzz.com/cars/rolls-royce/ghost/specs-and-trims
    https://www.motor1.com/features/308149/most-expensive-new-cars-ever/
    It doesn’t matter. It’s the point to what I was saying. So there are a number of cars that cost $6 million, and more that cost $2 million. Ok, if you really think that would change the argument, fine, but it really doesn’t. You could also exclude these really developing nation cheap mass produced cars too, as they wouldn’t be allowed to run on the roads in most developed countries, and the the number remains the same in the middle. You’re nitpicking, you know.
  • Reply 49 of 51
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 33,533member

    macgui said:
    I will be competing with Melgross and others for a shot at an AVP on day one. As is another poster, I too will be a simple user, wanting only (at this time) to consume immersive video at home, and not worry TSA. As we find out more about the AVP down the road that could influenced my decision to pull the trigger.

    Apps aside, what audio and video content might be available for consumption and how will it be loaded into the AVP. AirPlay? Apple Music? The price doesn't seem at all steep to me for I've seen so far. But if it doesn't do what I'm interested in then it's a non-starter. I need to brush up on the APV.
    It will be interesting to see who gets it. Back in the day I worked on game gevelopment and I have a bad habit of buying games that are touted as being state of the art in graphics, play and sound. That’s why I would buy this. I’m interesting in what it can do and. What developers will be coming out with. I’ll likely get software I don’t need, just to try it out. 
  • Reply 50 of 51
    So, a base 16’ M2MAX Macbook Pro or a Apple Vision Pro… Both are 3500$



    AVP has a base M2 processor and a R1 co-prosessor with a very fast memory system/RAM, it comes with advanced cameras and Lidar sensors. And the rough equivalent of a 8k screen.
     
    For 3d scanning and possibly 3d sculpting and some modelling work (depending on available software, not high hopes) AVP is unmatched in hardware performance. But likely software would take a year or so to mature. There are already some very good options in software on iOS, Nomad sculpt and some others. I WISH Blender made an entry, but that is a bit optimistic.. It would be nice if Unreal and Apple could bury their grudge… But I suppose not since Apple is implementing their competitor Unity, Unity is great dont get me wrong. But Unreal is more used in real time VFX for film.


    If I were to choose, atleast a couple years down. I might go with Apple Vision Pro instead of a Macbook. Especially if AVP can capture great 180VR footage and works as an editing platform too.

    I have some painting applications on oculus 2 whatever, 3d sculpting stuff. Painting in VR/AR shows potential, as in better then digital painting on a iPad Pro/Wacom-mac combo. Why? I am not sure, working big directly on a canvas feels very nice. Blowing up art the size of a barn is interesting. It feels more analogue in a way.


    Apples spatial computing platform should be considered a "computing platform" equal to MacOS and different to iOS… When you stop comparing to the toys facebook has put forth, it makes more sense I think. The exciting thing is that Apple did not dissappoint in the scope of their ambition with AR/Spatial computing, and I think we will see some very cool new possibilities in the next decade from AVP and subsequent releases. Especially considering the outsized possibilities with nanolenses past 2026.. Thin wearable glasses and amazing cameras where optics are not a weight/size consideration.

    AVP is a new Apple computer, with a fully stereoscopical 3d operative system. Apple controls the entire stack, from silicon to finished product… I wouldn’t have been able to even dream of such a reality in 1998 when Apple was almost bankrupt. I think we are in for some cool revolutionary stuff in just a mere 2-3 years.










    edited August 2023
  • Reply 51 of 51
    Thanks for the impressions. Super disappointed that the safari experience is poor. This is the one app Apple needed to nail and the one that sells the platform like it did for the original iphone. Still waiting for a device with a resolution that makes reading text as good as it is on phones, Ipads etc.
Sign In or Register to comment.