If Apple asked "you" what apps you would like that are not available on the Mac...

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  • Reply 61 of 123
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Frank777

    Getting the program on OS X would be nice, but an Access to Filemaker tool is really all the platform needs.



    Don't have a clue if this is what you are talking about, but it might be worth a look:



    http://www.actualtechnologies.com/product_access.php
  • Reply 62 of 123
    midwintermidwinter Posts: 10,060member
    Better Groupwise support?including a way to sync a palm with Groupwise in OS X.
  • Reply 63 of 123
    kabalkabal Posts: 3member
    i'd like to have SOUND FORGE, ACID, and VEGAS. actually the whole Sony Software Suite...
  • Reply 64 of 123
    benroethigbenroethig Posts: 2,782member
    1. Filemaker Lite and spreadsheet for iWork with iWork now bundled with all Macs.

    2. Professional Office suite with Filemaker Pro, Pages Pro, Keynote Pro, and a pro version of the afore mentioned spreadsheet.

    3. Apple financial app in with full import/export for money and Quicken. Bundled with all Macs.

    4. Elgato bought out and eyeTV (make that iTV) becomes part of iLife and front row. Support for most popular internal and external t.v. tuners.

    5. iWeb with html import capability

    6. Professional web publishing based on iWeb.
  • Reply 65 of 123
    frank777frank777 Posts: 5,834member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by BenRoethig

    1. Filemaker Lite and spreadsheet for iWork with iWork now bundled with all Macs.

    2. Professional Office suite with Filemaker Pro, Pages Pro, Keynote Pro, and a pro version of the afore mentioned spreadsheet.

    3. Apple financial app in with full import/export for money and Quicken. Bundled with all Macs.

    4. Elgato bought out and eyeTV (make that iTV) becomes part of iLife and front row. Support for most popular internal and external t.v. tuners.

    5. iWeb with html import capability

    6. Professional web publishing based on iWeb.




    That's the best list I've seen so far. Too bad that it will never happen.
  • Reply 66 of 123
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Kashimash

    Solidworks, AutoCAD and 3DSMAX



    Wait two weeks, and your first request may be answered. Not SolidWorks, but just as good...
  • Reply 67 of 123
    bigbluebigblue Posts: 341member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by mortigi tempo

    Wait two weeks, and your first request may be answered. Not SolidWorks, but just as good...



    That sounds tempting ...
  • Reply 68 of 123
    Quote:

    Originally posted by BigBlue

    That sounds tempting ...



    Yes, by all accounts, there's going to be quite a song and dance about this - Apple themselves will be making the announcement, not the company releasing the software, for various reasons.



    (disclaimer - I have no insider knowledge at Apple - this comes from elsewhere)
  • Reply 69 of 123
    splinemodelsplinemodel Posts: 7,311member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by mortigi tempo

    Yes, by all accounts, there's going to be quite a song and dance about this - Apple themselves will be making the announcement, not the company releasing the software, for various reasons.



    If not SolidWorks, and just as good, then. . .? If it's ProE then I'm going to have to eat my words that I made in this very thread.
  • Reply 70 of 123
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Splinemodel

    If not SolidWorks, and just as good, then. . .? If it's ProE then I'm going to have to eat my words that I made in this very thread.



    Did you know Apple doesn't currently design its products on Macs...
  • Reply 71 of 123
    dave k.dave k. Posts: 1,306member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by kcmac

    That's 2 words. And yes, it does suck.



    Explain.
  • Reply 72 of 123
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,949member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Dave K.

    Explain.



    I don't think there's much point. It looked like kcmac was trying to be vague and pedantic in the same one line post.



    Historically anyway, Access wasn't very reliable, didn't scale well and used its own proprietary language, so it wasn't portable to anything else, if the need grew, it had to be re-written or hacked into something that works on a larger scale, with a very painful conversion process using custom software just so that the data is transferred. This is second hand from someone that did small scale database programming for a living, so I can't directly vouch for it.
  • Reply 73 of 123
    jeffdmjeffdm Posts: 12,949member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by mortigi tempo

    Did you know Apple doesn't currently design its products on Macs...



    It probably wouldn't be too surprising. Supposedly Intel used VAXes in fabbing their own chips for a couple decades.
  • Reply 74 of 123
    dave k.dave k. Posts: 1,306member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by JeffDM

    I don't think there's much point. It looked like kcmac was trying to be vague and pedantic in the same one line post.



    Historically anyway, Access wasn't very reliable, didn't scale well and used its own proprietary language, so it wasn't portable to anything else, if the need grew, it had to be re-written or hacked into something that works on a larger scale, with a very painful conversion process using custom software just so that the data is transferred. This is second hand from someone that did small scale database programming for a living, so I can't directly vouch for it.




    I am not a MS lover by any means. But I really have to set the record straight with Access. I have worked extensively with Access for over 7 years. It is extremely powerful database tool and a top notch application. To debunk some myths about Access:



    Access is far more scaleable than anything on the Mac side. Name your database and Access can connect to it (either natively or through ODBC). MS Jet provides a good database engine as a start. Direct interfacing to SQL server (through Access Projects) is the enterprise class solution.



    Working (i.e., creating) databases in Access is very straight forward and logically designed.



    Access and VB/VBA work in-conjunction with one another. The development language for Access is Visual Basic for Applications. It shares the same syntax as VB 6. It has been this way since Access 1997 (maybe Access 95). The VB language has been well defined by MS engineers over the years. No hacks or proprietary language problems. Tons of functionality. In fact, you can call C++ routines within Access if you wanted to.



    Through Active-X controls your database can interface with hundreds (if not thousands) of other Windows applications directly within the Access database. Very powerful. For example, I have used it to tie my databases directly to Lotus Notes and MS Outlook.



    All in all, Access if a great, great tool. I have tried using FileMaker Pro a couple of times and felt it was missing simple functionality that has been in Access for year and years (e.g,, the ability to visually create relationships between table).



    If MS converted Access over to Mac, it would be a tremendous asset.



    Dave
  • Reply 75 of 123
    kim kap solkim kap sol Posts: 2,987member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Dave K.

    I am not a MS lover by any means. But I really have to set the record straight with Access. I have worked extensively with Access for over 7 years. It is extremely powerful database tool and a top notch application. To debunk some myths about Access:



    Access is far more scaleable than anything on the Mac side. Name your database and Access can connect to it (either natively or through ODBC). MS Jet provides a good database engine as a start. Direct interfacing to SQL server (through Access Projects) is the enterprise class solution.



    Working (i.e., creating) databases in Access is very straight forward and logically designed.



    Access and VB/VBA work in-conjunction with one another. The development language for Access is Visual Basic for Applications. It shares the same syntax as VB 6. It has been this way since Access 1997 (maybe Access 95). The VB language has been well defined by MS engineers over the years. No hacks or proprietary language problems. Tons of functionality. In fact, you can call C++ routines within Access if you wanted to.



    Through Active-X controls your database can interface with hundreds (if not thousands) of other Windows applications directly within the Access database. Very powerful. For example, I have used it to tie my databases directly to Lotus Notes and MS Outlook.



    All in all, Access if a great, great tool. I have tried using FileMaker Pro a couple of times and felt it was missing simple functionality that has been in Access for year and years (e.g,, the ability to visually create relationships between table).



    If MS converted Access over to Mac, it would be a tremendous asset.



    Dave




    It's actually a plague to all integrated information systems out there...it's the last thing the Mac or any company of the present and future need.



    I don't care if you've got 20 years of experience. I personally have 5...I know how Access works...yes, it's, uh, flexible (but that's stretching it, IMO)...but it's a total pain to integrate it with other systems.



    The app is begging to be rewritten...hasn't MS said they're not going to update Access anymore? MS is moving away from VB...



    ...the effort and time to port this app to OS X would be long, hard and wasted.
  • Reply 76 of 123
    dave k.dave k. Posts: 1,306member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by kim kap sol

    It's actually a plague to all integrated information systems out there...it's the last thing the Mac or any company of the present and future need.



    I don't care if you've got 20 years of experience. I personally have 5...I know how Access works...yes, it's, uh, flexible (but that's stretching it, IMO)...but it's a total pain to integrate it with other systems.



    It's also got the old Win 95 feel to it. We're in fucking 2006.




    What the hell are you integrating??? Please explain this. You don't integrate desktop databases to other systems. I don't care if it is Access or FileMaker Pro or Visual FoxPro or 4D. Again. Define what level of system integration you are looking for. Are you integrating multiple database?



    Access 2003 doesn't have any old Win 95 feel to it. What are you talking about?



    Perhaps you simply don't know Access very well, so you are struggling with it?



    Dave
  • Reply 77 of 123
    dave k.dave k. Posts: 1,306member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by kim kap sol

    MS is moving away from VB...



    Source please.
  • Reply 78 of 123
    kim kap solkim kap sol Posts: 2,987member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Dave K.

    What the hell are you integrating??? Please explain this. You don't integrate desktop databases to other systems. I don't care if it is Access or FileMaker Pro or Visual FoxPro or 4D. Again. Define what level of system integration you are looking for. Are you integrating multiple database?



    Access 2003 doesn't have any old Win 95 feel to it. What are you talking about?



    Perhaps you simply don't know Access very well, so you are struggling with it?



    Dave




    Perhaps, you've never used Access and you're talking about some other database app.
  • Reply 79 of 123
    dave k.dave k. Posts: 1,306member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by kim kap sol

    Perhaps, you've never used Access and you're talking about some other database app.



    That must be it.



    Sorry. I was a little strong. Like I said, I have only really used Access. I have heard great things from the folks who use FileMaker Pro. I have tried that app. Never been impressed with it. Talk about a old interface.



    I guess lets agree to disagree with Access.



    BTW. When is Apple going to reabsorb FileMaker again. FileMaker's website talks about all of these business solutions it offers. But everyone in IT that I know have no idea that FileMaker is an Apple application. I don't get it.



    Dave
  • Reply 80 of 123
    kim kap solkim kap sol Posts: 2,987member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Dave K.

    Source please.



    Let's just say that VB.NET is quite a different beast.
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