hungover

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  • Apple working with Consumer Reports on MacBook Pro battery findings, says Phil Schiller

    When I first read the report, I have decided not to buy one of these new macs. I trust CR's reports. I remember their report on bending iPhone 6 Plus. After that report all the phone manufacturers made their phones even more stronger.

    My first touchscreen smart phone was purchased in 2004, it had a 3.5" screen.

    It, and all of my subsequent phones have lived in my rear trouser pocket during the day. None has ever bent. My current handset has a 5.7" screen.

    The CR test was questioned by the firm that supplied the 3 point bending machine- they recommended a 4 point bending rig- CR ignored their advice.


    magman1979chia
  • Apple, Silicon Valley raised millions to fund Hillary Clinton platform backing tech's positions on

    I can't believe out of 400 million Americans we get to chose from these two losers!
    320 million, and it’ll be under 300 after Trump has fixed the problem.
    If Trump really gets into power,I suspect that much more than 20 million people will leave the USA, unfortunately for them those that would have emigrated to the UK will now probably have to move to Scotland, after us Little Britains showed that we too can be swayed by racist dickheads (see: Nigel Farage).

       
    ai46mobiusmontrosemacsbaconstang
  • Apple, Silicon Valley raised millions to fund Hillary Clinton platform backing tech's positions on

    badmonk said:
    Great article DED.  As an independent, i am convinced Apple's most pressing immediate threat is a Trump presidency.  His talk of an Apple boycott over encryption , the sabotaging of international and trade relationships, forcing the return of iPhone manufacturing to the US, etc is ultimately bad for business.  This is why major business leaders are supporting Clinton.  You can argue that they are doing it out of self-interest, but Trump does not understand the way modern business runs.  And talk about currency and the Federal Reserve maybe valid points but it is not enough to make up for his faults.
    I don't have a dog in this fight (I live in the UK) but would you really put the needs of one tech firm above the greater good of your fellow citizens?


    gatorguycullypatchythepirateslingwingrbelizexixo
  • Apple says hidden Safari setting led to flawed Consumer Reports MacBook Pro battery tests

    Soli said:
    hungover said:
    They repeated the (non-cached) test a number of times, visiting the same local websites and got massively different results. And still they are at fault?
    Regarding that, yes they are. When you go from 4.5 hours to 19.5 hours (nearly doubling Apple's statement of 10 hours under normal use) while doing a very specific test that only uses website page loads and does so with an developer setting disabled, then they should've considered there was something else going on.

    And this isn't the first time CR has used poor methodology to test technology. There is no skullduggery on their part, they simply don't have the expertise needed to do a comprehensive test that can trusted, regardless of whether it's above or below a company's own battery life results.
    Apple say that their own test comprises of them only visiting 25 "popular" sites over Wifi until the battery dies.

    In order to ensure continuity I would imagine that Apple store those sites in a cache on their own local servers. And that those same caches are used year in, year out, to ensure that each new Mac is tested under the same stresses as the previous ones. 

    If my assumption is correct (which I accept might not be the case) then the only difference is that Apple cache those sites on the Mac, CR don't. Neither test strikes me as being particularly complex or scientific though (and neither is particularly "real world" unless the "typical" user only ever visits the same 25 static websites).
    singularity
  • Apple, Silicon Valley raised millions to fund Hillary Clinton platform backing tech's positions on

    mattinoz said:
    jdw said:
    jdw said:
    ...Gary Johnson or Jill Stein too.
    Two people who are 5% and 1% in the polls, respectively?

    If you know, why don't you tell us? In fact, I challenge you to tell us. 
    Folks, you know full well that if the mainstream media, including tech media like AppleInsider, would put those supposedly "irrelevant candidates" in the face of Americans perpetually, those candidates would no longer be as "irrelevant" as you contend in the minds of most Americas.  Yes, that's right -- the media shapes how we voters think insofar as our brains tend to only think about those candidates that are placed in front of our face continually.  Hide a valid candidate from our eyes and we think they are irrelevant.  Funny how that works.

    If a candidate has no chance of winning in America, it's not necessarily due to their platform policies or lack of knowledge on non-tech related matters like Aleppo.  Sadly, it all comes down to "advertising."  And guess which two parties get the most advertising, which is not necessarily tied to money, but what the media decides to advertise.  People bash Johnson for Aleppo and a couple other things you can count on one hand.  Try counting all the major verbal gaffs of Clinton or Trump even using 2 hands.  And by the way, I am not really fond of Johnson or Stein, yet I seek to have them included.  Ponder that.

    As to why I don't add to the AppleInsider article, that's obvious.  I am not a writer for AppleInsider and it is therefore their responsibility to include candidates who are outside the Donkeys or Elephants.  (And I say this as a long time registered Elephant, by the way.)
    Yes the two party system is a convention not a requirement and every western democracy has rules built around the fact the elected representatives will need to form consensus not just turn up with one to install. Yet we let them get away with claiming that anything other than 1 majority party will render the system broken or worse still that one party having a majority should give them free reign to do what they want.

    Even with a majority of voters Math just doesn't support their claim they represent the will of the people.
    *Noting I say this as Australian not an American but as far as I can tell both our systems seem on the broken side.
    At least you have a none of the above option. I wish we had that in the UK but i suspect that the politicians don't want their lack of popularity to be officially recorded. Mind you it might stop the votes cast for the (very) extreme parties.
  • Too soon? Apple's new iPhone 7 ruffles feathers with Lightning audio, Home button changes

    Soli said:
    hungover said:
    Sorry but I don't understand the claim that Apple had to ditch the 3.5mm socket so that they could make the phone waterproof.

    Don't the latest Galaxy phones have waterproof headphone sockets (that do not require a rubber bung)?
    1) Removing points of ingress does make it easier to waterproof. Apple even talked about this with the Apple Watch and microphone and speaker ports.

    2) Apple talked about what the internals space and edge "real estate" savings allowed their engineers to do, and this only the beginning. Think of how removing the ODD made way for a truly modern notebook.

    3) Samsung can claim anything they want. A statement of waterproof is a lie. As statement of water-resistance is possible, but it doesn't mean your device will not be affected. An IPx7 rating only means they had a device tested that met that qualification, which in the case of a '7' for water-resistance means it can withstand being submerged In fresh water for 30 minutes at a depth of 1M, but it doesn't mean your device will not be affected.

    This goes the same for any product by Apple. Keep in mind that any statement of water-proof, water-resistance, or an IP rating is to appeal to the customer (i.e.: marketing), but it doesn't mean the device can handle it. The company could have used an adhesive that will be 95% effective for about 6 months of use and then start to drop at a rate of about 10% per month. They may have also figured out that their customer-based isn't likely to go swimming with the device they're marketing so their risk is low. It's all about the numbers. We see something similar in battery capacity and fast charging, when many vendors use poor batteries that don't hold up well over time. Even Apple has a disclaimer that water damage isn't covered under their warranty, but I doubt they would forego replacing a defective device that was used in the proper way; it's more or less to legally protect themselves from the potential of pushing well past the limits of the device.
    Yes it was sloppy of me to use the term "waterproof" as shorthand for water resistant but Apple succeeded in making the Lightning port water resistant, why not the headphone socket? DED's assertion that the port had to die to make the phone water resistant seems dubious and reads like a half- hearted platitude (made by him and not by Apple)
  • Too soon? Apple's new iPhone 7 ruffles feathers with Lightning audio, Home button changes

    Sorry but I don't understand the claim that Apple had to ditch the 3.5mm socket so that they could make the phone waterproof.

    Don't the latest Galaxy phones have waterproof headphone sockets (that do not require a rubber bung)?
    singularity
  • Professor proves NAND mirroring attack thwarts iPhone 5c security protocols

    foggyhill said:
    Didn't we ALREADY know that. I actually knew that without even trying (because I'm a computer engineer).
    That; why Apple changed it later.
    It's not an easy attack though; if a person is doing that to your phone, I'm guessing you can spring for an Iphone 7...
    If Apple were aware that the data could be extracted from the 5c using that technique why did they refuse to help the FBI and insist that the only way to extract the data would require custom code that could fall into the hands of criminals?

    Apple could have helped the FBI and then said "sorry guys, as much as we'd like to, we can't help you with any newer handsets" . Doing so would have been likely to have strengthened their case against future law enforcement demands and saved the public purse a shed load of money.