elijahg

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elijahg
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  • Power button Touch ID on the iPad Air 4 was an 'incredible feat'

    hmlongco said:
    Stretches credibility since it’s not like Apple is the first to have this capability
    I suspect that once more it's a case of Apple taking a feature and actually doing it right....

    https://beebom.com/galaxy-a7-power-button-fingerprint-scanner-face-unlock/
    Well Sony had it in Q4 2015 (except in the US, because Apple had patented a fingerprint reader in a power button in Q2 2015) and it is as fast as the one on the then current 6S. So really, Sony beat them to the punch by 4 years, which also means this is 4 year old tech that Apple is touting as an "incredible feat". That said, I have no idea how secure the Sony one is comparatively. The touch sensors are essentially ultra-high resolution CMOS-based touchscreens, high enough resolution to capture the ridges of your fingerprint in detail high with enough resolution to authenticate. 

    Also:
    "On the cellular iPads, the top portion of the enclosure is the antenna," Ternus explained, which meant they had to place "this incredibly sensitive Touch ID sensor right inside an incredibly sensitive antenna, and had to figure out how to make them work with each other and not be talking over each other and causing interference."

    Surely a simple solution is turn off the RF for a few hundred milliseconds while the fingerprint snapshot is taken, as to not affect the sensor, which wouldn't drop the cellular connections as they're easily robust enough to lose several seconds of data. 

    This all sounds like a lot of marketing bluster to me. 

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  • Power button Touch ID on the iPad Air 4 was an 'incredible feat'

    Xed said:
    elijahg said:
    hmlongco said:
    Stretches credibility since it’s not like Apple is the first to have this capability
    I suspect that once more it's a case of Apple taking a feature and actually doing it right....

    https://beebom.com/galaxy-a7-power-button-fingerprint-scanner-face-unlock/
    Well Sony had it in Q4 2015 (except in the US, because Apple had patented a fingerprint reader in a power button in Q2 2015) and it is as fast as the one on the then current 6S. So really, Sony beat them to the punch by 4 years, which also means this is 4 year old tech that Apple is touting as an "incredible feat". That said, I have no idea how secure the Sony one is comparatively. 

    Also:
    "On the cellular iPads, the top portion of the enclosure is the antenna," Ternus explained, which meant they had to place "this incredibly sensitive Touch ID sensor right inside an incredibly sensitive antenna, and had to figure out how to make them work with each other and not be talking over each other and causing interference."

    Surely a simple solution is turn off the RF for a few hundred milliseconds while the fingerprint snapshot is taken, as to not affect the sensor, which wouldn't drop the cellular connections as they're easily robust enough to lose several seconds of data. 

    This all sounds like a lot of marketing bluster to me. 

    Which means you have no idea what it took to put a fast and secure version of Touch ID into the Sleep/Wake button.

    If we are talking about technically having fingerprint recognition then it could've been done decades ago with those thin bar that you swipe your finger across, but note that Apple never once added that and your comments would also imply that Touch ID was never an impressive or advanced biometric inclusion at any point simply because it was after someone else had some very basic option. Do you not see the fault in your logic? It's like saying the Sistine Chapel is on par with the botched restoration of "Ecce Homo" because they're both religious art.
    Well, I do, as I said and you conveniently edited out: 
    The touch sensors are essentially ultra-high resolution CMOS-based touchscreens, high enough resolution to capture the ridges of your fingerprint in detail high with enough resolution to authenticate.

    There is no fault in my logic because I did not imply that TouchID was not impressive, you are using a strawman argument to disprove something I did not say. 

    The original TouchID was impressive, and at the time capacitive fingerprint readers were extremely rare, no one else had them. Squeezing all that into a button for the first time was an incredible feat. An entirely new form of an existing concept (that works very well) is what made the original TouchID impressive. Reshaping the button that uses preexisting tech to match what a competitor had 4 years prior is not an "incredible feat". 

    The reason Apple isn't using the bar method is because it required IR LEDs in addition to the sensor and was about 10mm thick. Sony is using capacitive sensing in their button, just like Apple. The security of it is mostly down to the resolution and the software, and there have been no reports of the Sony sensor being fooled any more easily than TouchID, which is good, but isn't infallible. Sony's in-button sensing was a first, and as such was more of an "incredible feat" than Apple's version 4 years later, though it again is just an evolution of a capacitive sensor. Apple seems to imply their sensor is "incredible" because of its apparent immunity to RF noise. 

    Yes, what your strawman would be like saying the Sistine Chapel is on par with the restoration of Ecce Homo. But my argument is not that. It is that the original TouchID was much more impressive because whilst people always built cathedrals (sensors) from mud, Apple came along and built them from stone instead. Sony then reshaped that chapel into something much more sleek, but still out of stone, and 4 years later, Apple did the same and called it an "incredible feat" because they did it.

    Perhaps instead of lapping up Apple's marketing, try using a more neutral stance to see the difference between actual "incredible feats" such as the original TouchID, and this, an evolution of already existing tech.


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  • Tom Hanks disappointed with Apple TV+ 'Greyhound' release

    mtriviso said:
    Sigh. Just open the movie theaters. There's nothing like watching a movie in a massive IMAX 3D theater. If people are frightened they might get the rona, then just stay at home. Please, just let the rest of us who are unafraid enjoy what our acting troupes have to offer in the milieu to which we have become accustomed. 
    Yeah because watching movies at cinemas is such an essential pass-time that you'll die without it. It's not all about you, it's about protection of others. Considering the US's current trajectory, it's unlikely there will be much more easing of lockdown.
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  • Apple's MagSafe Duo charger not compatible with first-party 29W adapter

    A quick look at MagSafe Duo's specifications explains why the charger doesn't work with the older adapter.
    And as well as not telling us here, the later linked article also has no mention of the 29w power supply directly. And Apple's page saying nothing more than it's incompatible.

    LMFTFY: The 29w charger only deals with USB PD 2.0, and therefore whilst the 29w USB C PSU can supply the required 3a at 5v or 1.67a at 9v, it won't because the dock needs PD 3.0, and the USB PD 2.0 fallback  doesn't provide enough juice. A slightly more expensive voltage regulator that supported USB PD 2.0 and 3.0 in the dock would have dealt with that. Apple could have had a fallback to PD 2 or below, and had the dock charge one or the other items so that in a pinch (likely when travelling), you could borrow a super common USB A charger or use a USB A wall socket. I see USB-A wall sockets all over the place, yet to see a USB-C one. My Anker charging puck works just fine charging my iPhone X with a 5v/2a power supply, and I even have a 5w wireless charger that is slow but fine for overnight charging.

    This thing is becoming a bigger and bigger white elephant as each day passes.
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  • Facebook tests Face ID authentication for iOS Messenger app

    I avoid that app for many reasons.   This will just add to that list.

    We know FB has no loyalty, scruples, values or integrity.   We know they already know more about us than we know ourselves.  So, how do they plan to benefit from this?

    The irony of it is:   People are alarmed at governments ID'ing faces --- but they'll be fine with FB doing it!
    I also avoid it for many reasons. But since this is using Apple's FaceID APIs, it can't actually ID your face. Well, not thought FaceID at least - it can through normal use of the camera.
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  • Apple sues recycler for allegedly reselling 100,000 devices it was hired to scrap

    Surely if these devices were good enough to resell, it would be better to resell them than recycle them. It's always more eco-friendly to keep using an existing phone than buy a new one.
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  • Apple loses ground to Samsung in European smartphone market

    Most of my friends used to have iPhones. Now most of my friends have Android phones, at half the cost of an iPhone with 80% of the features. Every one of them has said the reason they switched was the price, they're totally happy with their £350 Androids which do everything they need. Most people don't need an 8-core CPU with 6GB RAM and the very best camera, to which Apple's answer to is the still-too-expensive Xr. Apple doesn't make a phone for most people anymore, so they find what they're looking for in the Android world for half the cost of the iPhone. In fact I'm sure most people would be happy with 6s performance and features for something like £349.

    Even at the high end, people can get a top-of-the-line Samsung with more storage for less dollar than an iPhone Xs. Samsung's lesser phones are much cheaper than the 8 and the Xr, and are current, unlike the 8. Apple used to be expensive but pretty good value, now they're a ripoff. I'm still rocking my 6s and refuse to pay Apple's overinflated prices for an Xs.
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  • Power button Touch ID on the iPad Air 4 was an 'incredible feat'

    pk22901 said:
    I don't want to take away from the great work Apple did with incorporating TouchID within the power button they could have simply used FaceID to pull off an all-screen design.  There's enough bezel there to do it.  FaceID is very convenient on a big screen device like an iPad.
    Maybe Apple is replacing Face ID with Touch ID going forward. Every one of its devices can eventually include this Touch ID tech except for today's Watch. Refining this for the Watch may come soon. 

    Why? It may be less self-conscious than FaceID and maybe being much more secure. (Just a surmise.)
    I think *both* would be best. The attention aware stuff with FaceID is great, and it's less prone to error than TouchID. A wet or gloved finger breaks TouchID completely. But in a masked world, TouchID isn't affected. Also with FaceID you only have to look at the phone and you can see your notifications, but you would have to fumble to put your finger on the power button for TouchID.
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  • Apple Silicon M1 Macs do not support eGPUs

    I will admit to not knowing too much about this, but my impression was that eGPUs were connected to Intel’s PCI standard, and therefore would only function with Intel chipsets.  So of course Apple Silicon would not support EGPUs.

    If I understood the keynote correctly, it seemed like the Apple CPUs and graphics chips were designed to work directly together, cutting the overhead of external chipsets and therefore much faster and more efficient.  This means you are counting on Apple’s graphics engineers as your sole source for graphics developments.  

    I was expecting to see a 16” MacBook Pro after the 13” MacBook Pro.  So I was disappointed that didn’t happen. But the logical conclusion is that the larger MacBook Pro systems are going to be considerably faster than the lesser models and therefore very much worth looking at.  I think we should pass judgement on Apple’s solutions here when the larger machine is introduced and benchmarked.

    However, I’m tempted to buy a 13” MacBook Pro just so I can say I have it and am on the cutting edge ... just the typical programmer’s ego I’m afraid.

    I concur with most of your post, although using the logic in your first paragraph we should not have been expecting Thunderbolt support, since Thunderbolt up until now "would only function with Intel chipsets." Somehow Apple managed to make Thunderbolt (v3) work, and (perhaps) they could have managed the same with PCI. Especially since the PCI standard is no longer managed by Intel but by PCI-SIG which has 800 members, but the primary members seem to be: AgilentAMDDellHPIntelSynopsysNVIDIA, and Qualcomm. I don't see Apple in there.
    Every computer vendor in the world supports PCI. the M1 for sure has PCI or it would be Dead on Arrival. PCIe is the defacto standard that DDR memory runs over. The ignorance of some who called this Intel's PCI standard is sad in the year 2020.
    But the new Apple Silicon Macs use PoP memory, not DDR memory, right? Are you saying these new Macs support PCI? We're talking about the new Macs. I'm confused.
    PoP and DDR aren't necessarily mutually exclusive. It's probably DDR and PoP. @mdriftmeyer is wrong in that DDR runs over PCIe though, it does not. And as I mentioned previously, PoP is probably why the RAM is limited to 16GB. More than 16GB would require too much physical space atop the CPU, or extra pins on the bottom of the CPU and thus a new CPU package. This is why is also why I think the M1 is little more than a slightly beefed up iPhone/iPad CPU. If it was actually designed from the ground up for Mac, there's little reason to use the expensive PoP method, which is mainly to save space. But anyway, some form of PCIe is supported to a certain extent by the M1 (and Ax CPUs), because the NVME interface for the SSDs uses PCIe. It's probably just a single PCIe lane.
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  • Valve abandons the macOS version of SteamVR

    schlack said:
    If they have Linux support that seems like a decent work around for Mac owners if they’re willing to install Linux via boot camp. 
    If you're going to do that, you may as well install Windows and have access to all Steam games. And by that point if you play games more than a few times a week, you may as well just get a PC instead of a Mac.
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