airmanchairman

About

Username
airmanchairman
Joined
Visits
42
Last Active
Roles
member
Points
45
Badges
0
Posts
358
  • Over-the-air iOS 10.3 update for iPhone 5, 5c pulled by Apple for reasons unknown

    My iPhone 5 took the better part of an hour and a half, but it installed successfully first time around. Initially, it downloaded faster than both my iPad Pro 9.7" and my iPhone 5S (smaller payload?), verified the download first and started installing, but then was overtaken, first by my iPad then by the 5S. After a long while, I was greeted by the welcome screen and all is good so far, with crisp and snappy operation...
    GeorgeBMacejdinPhilly
  • Google faces $9 billion in damages after ripping off Java in Android

    bkkcanuck said:
    Rayz2016 said:
    bkkcanuck said:
    I disagree with the Federal Court.  

    API is just the interface (e.g. add(operand1, operand2) - i.e. no implementation to that - and implementation is basically 99%+ of the code).

    Being able to use an API for compatibility purposes is no different than for example Open Office being able to implement the file format for Word.  The need for competition outweighs the argument as an API protected IP.   Google's implementation uses the API (common) and then the implementation code which is probably more than 99% of the code base.  As long as Google did not copy the code itself the API itself should be fair use.  Languages and APIs should not be able to be protected as API.  

    The court has already previously ruled that you cannot protect interfaces for hardware for the purposes of locking out the competition on things like printer cartridges etc.  An API is not much different than the software equivalent.  

    Actually, Google did copy code from Java. That's how the case first got started, but that's not really the point. The Java license permits this as fair use, and many of us have made a good living from Java and have given back by helping out on other projects and with occasional bug fixes. If fork a new version of Java, however, and then make a commercial product based around this fork then you are expected to buy a license. IBM did, and so did Microsoft.
    Please provide some backup for this statement - I have read quite a few articles and the code that was "copied" was always the API (outline) i.e. java.util.BigDecimal.<method> - no implementation code.  



    Identical lines of code don't lie. All available in Scribd online:

    http://www.zdnet.com/article/oracle-says-google-directly-copied-java-code-heres-the-line-by-line-comparison/
    watto_cobrajony0
  • Investigation finds FBI did not exhaust all options before taking Apple to trial in San Be...

    So it wasn’t just a plot to force tech companies to add back doors.  Rather, it was an incompetent plot to force tech companies to add back doors.  Glad we got that cleared up.  


    Yes, I believe that was the intention all along, and the efforts in this regard are not exhausted yet. A luta Continua... And no-one seems to recall that the company that eventually enabled them to break into the iPhone was hacked from unknown sources months later, vindicating Tim Cook's stand and fulfilling his prophecy!
    jbdragonwatto_cobra
  • Apple issues iOS 9.3.6 and iOS 10.3.4 updates for older iPhone and iPad models

    plankton said:
    The 9.3.6 update for the old iPhone 4s does not seem to want to do an OTA download and install.  Just sits with endless download and install message.
    I got around this on my iPad 3 & iPhone 4S by downloading the IPSW files on my PC & installing them via iTunes. This was after iTunes informed me that it needed to upgrade to version 12.8 in order to perform the upgrade. I ignored it (I want to keep the iTunes App Store) & used the local IPSW method, which installed both successfully!
    watto_cobra
  • Google faces $9 billion in damages after ripping off Java in Android

    gatorguy said:
    auxio said:
    gatorguy said:
    auxio said:
    auxio said:
    bkkcanuck said:
    I disagree with the Federal Court.  

    API is just the interface (e.g. add(operand1, operand2) - i.e. no implementation to that - and implementation is basically 99%+ of the code).

    Being able to use an API for compatibility purposes is no different than for example Open Office being able to implement the file format for Word.  The need for competition outweighs the argument as an API protected IP.   Google's implementation uses the API (common) and then the implementation code which is probably more than 99% of the code base.  As long as Google did not copy the code itself the API itself should be fair use.  Languages and APIs should not be able to be protected as API.  

    The court has already previously ruled that you cannot protect interfaces for hardware for the purposes of locking out the competition on things like printer cartridges etc.  An API is not much different than the software equivalent.  

    However, even if you are diehard Google hater - it's not clear whether copyrighting Apis ist a good idea.
    I don't think it is.  However, I also don't think that someone who knowingly and willingly tries to find a way around a technology licensing agreement for tremendous profit should go unpunished.
    Well if you think they shouldn't be copyrightable then you can't object to Google suing them.

    I think it's also important to put the work that goes into Apis into perspective. Yes they take creativity. But they are not usually created out fo thin air. The Java API is influenced by countless Apis before it such as C and C++. 

    Oracle itself has benefited from standing on the shoulder of Giants. I am not aware that they pay IBM for the SQL syntax (admittedly a language rather than API but clearly groundbreaking and which changed the database industry). All the companies that use Hadoop based their work on the original Google 2005 MapReduce paper that outlines MR and GFS (both of which Hadoop implements).

    Oracle stands out for being incredible litigious and greedy. We will see who will win the next round in this particular fight.
    Forget the world of business and who owns what company.  I just have one simple question: do you think what Andy Rubin and company did with Java is right?

    In regard to those cases you state, if there are clear cases of licensing infringement (or clear intentional loophole exploitation) there, then I think Oracle should be made to pay.  The same way I think that Google should pay for what was done with Java.  Regardless of the fact that Java is now open source to anyone, at the time, the intent of Sun was to allow open source usage of Java in educational/non-profit situations, but you had to take a license if it was bundled in a commercial product.  Which was pretty standard for the time -- Qt used this model as well.
    Business decisions are not dependent on morality as a general rule. So yes let's forget who owns the company.

    There's been lots of questionable moves over the years, the highest profile example off the top of my head being Apple's use of Xerox IP and "hard work" design. While it didn't turn out to be found illegal the argument could be made it just wasn't right, that the intent to take it without recompense was there.  Yeah some money changed hands but not for the usage that Apple put it to IIRC.  After all the court filings from Xerox were over with it wasn't actually illegal tho, even if it might not have been "right" in the view of some folks. 
    https://www.nytimes.com/1989/12/15/business/company-news-xerox-sues-apple-computer-over-macintosh-copyright.html
    Are there similarities here?
    Opening the doors to your technology company (Xerox), giving someone a demo of the technology you're working on without an agreement in place, and having them go off and invest 5 or 6 years + a lot of money creating their own, fairly different version of it (including designing custom hardware) is pretty different than having someone willfully look for a loophole in your software licensing agreement (and exploit open source projects to do so with minimal investment of time, effort, or ideas).
    So that you're completely OK with. No issue with Android being influenced by Apple design choices then? It's certainly a fairly different version of it, requires years of work and a lot of money, and includes developing custom hardware. 
    You clearly don’t know the history of xerox parc and Apple.  SMH
    <br><br>
    No sir, you don't. Apple paid $1m in Apple shares for the privilege of what it took from PARC Xerox and vastly improved on it to boot.